131 episodes

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. Hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is brought to you in association with Christie's.
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The Week in Art by The Art Newspaper The Art Newspaper Podcasts

    • Visual Arts
    • 4.6, 73 Ratings

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. Hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is brought to you in association with Christie's.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Houston, do we have a problem?

    Houston, do we have a problem?

    As cultural institutions across the world are faced with deciding if and when to re-open, we look at two extremes: we hear from Brandon Zech, the publisher of the Texas-based art publication Glasstire, about a visit to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, one of the first museums in the US to re-open. And we discuss the Southbank Centre in London’s announcement that it’s at risk of closure until April 2021, with Ralph Rugoff, the director of the Hayward Gallery, one of the centre’s venues. And in the latest in our series Lonely Works—about objects in museums that are closed due to the virus—the artist Michael Rakowitz tells us about some ancient Sumerian figurines in the Oriental Institute in Chicago.
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    • 58 min
    Raphael: as great as Leonardo and Michelangelo?

    Raphael: as great as Leonardo and Michelangelo?

    This episode begins by celebrating good news: that the once-in-a-lifetime exhibition of works by Raphael at the Scuderie del Quirinale in Rome—which only opened for three days before being closed due to Covid-19 in March—will re-open on 2 June and run for three months until 30 August. The show, which begins with Raphael’s death and moves back in time, is the jewel in the crown of the celebrations across Europe and the US marking the 500th anniversary of Raphael’s death. Hugo Chapman, the Keeper of Prints and Drawings at the British Museum and a Raphael specialist, heralds the genius of an artist whose fame has somewhat unfairly been eclipsed by Leonardo and by his great rival Michelangelo.
    Also this week: the renaissance of mail art. Margaret Carrigan looks at the radical history of art in the post with Mariam Kienle, assistant professor of art history at the University of Kentucky, and about its revival as the US postal service is under threat from the Trump administration.
    And in the latest in the series Lonely Works, the artist Mark Dion discusses the American Museum of Natural History and its profound effect on his work.

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    • 1 hr 6 min
    Is the future of the art market online?

    Is the future of the art market online?

    This week would have been so-called "gigaweek", with the major auctions of Impressionist, Modern and contemporary art in New York. The events have, of course, been postponed. But are collectors buying art online instead? An explosion of digital initiatives and online galleries or viewing rooms followed the cancellation of fairs and the closure of auction houses and galleries over recent months due to the coronavirus. So this week, we’re looking at the implications of going digital for the art market.
    We talk to Scott Reyburn, who writes on the art market for The New York Times as well as The Art Newspaper, and our art market editors Anna Brady and Margaret Carrigan take us through some of the initiatives including their experience of the viewing room for Frieze New York. Also this week, in the latest in our Lonely Work series, exploring art behind closed doors in museums… Rebecca Salter, the president of the Royal Academy in London, tells us about Cemetery (1900-02) by the Belgian artist Léon Spilliaert, and gives us an update on the RAs exhibition programme.
    UPDATE: A new version of this episode was uploaded on 21 May to rectify an incorrect statement made by Scott Reyburn that the Frieze Viewing Rooms were only accessible to VIPs. After the initial VIP days, the Viewing Rooms were in fact open to all from 8-15 May. 

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    • 1 hr 6 min
    Exclusive: Marina Abramovic interview

    Exclusive: Marina Abramovic interview

    This week, we have an exclusive interview with Marina Abramovic: what's the future of performance in the post-pandemic art world? Also, as the lockdown steadily eases in Germany, we ask Catherine Hickley, The Art Newspaper's correspondent in Berlin, how it feels to step foot in a museum again. And in the latest in our Lonely Works series, the painter Ian Davenport tells us why he’s made a new body of work inspired by Pierre Bonnard’s Nude in the Bath (1936).
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    • 55 min
    Can tech recreate the hand of an Old Master?

    Can tech recreate the hand of an Old Master?

    This week, we look at how technologies like digital scanning and artificial intelligence (AI) are being used to create facsimiles of historic paintings. We talk to Adam Lowe of the Factum Foundation, leaders in the field of digital heritage preservation, ahead of three live discussions about technology and heritage on The Art Newspaper's YouTube channel on 1,2 and 3 May.
    Also this week, we talk to Sophie Matisse, the great-granddaughter of Henri, about following in his—and her great-grandmother Amélie’s—footsteps for a new BBC film. And in a slight twist on our Lonely Works series, the painter Lisa Yuskavage tells us about missing the great Van Eyck exhibition in Ghent because of the coronavirus.


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    • 1 hr 5 min
    The end of the blockbuster? Museums in a post-pandemic world

    The end of the blockbuster? Museums in a post-pandemic world

    This week, we look at museums in different parts of the globe: what’s their future in a world changed by the coronavirus?
    The doors of museums have slammed shut over recent weeks as Covid-19 has locked down countries across the world. So this week, we’re asking key figures in museums in the UK, the US and China: what happens next? We speak to Frances Morris, the director of Tate Modern, to Dan Weiss, the president and chief executive officer of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and to Philip Tinari, the director of the UCCA Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing—leaders within different museum cultures, with different challenges ahead. We also have the latest in our Lonely Works series, in which the Turner Prize-winning artist Mark Wallinger explores Jackson Pollock’s Autumn Rhythm (Number 30), in the Met. You can see an image of Autumn Rhythm as we discuss it at theartnewspaper.com/podcasts.

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    • 1 hr 7 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
73 Ratings

73 Ratings

anyasaunt ,

Top of the Line!

I have a wide range of interests and obsessions but this podcast rates #1. Incisive, passionate, in-depth explorations of issues globally.

Chadd Scott ,

The standard bearer art podcast

No art podcast is more connected to what’s taking place in the art world today with an emphasis on London and England.

Hans Obitz ,

Essential listening

Recently discovered this cast. Where have you been all my life? I love this cast. Always relevant artworks scoop and expert accounts of wide international art topics.
My weekly digest of the art wold. Thank you!

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