300 episodes

An in-depth look at the issues, culture and personalities shaping Canada today.

The Big Story Frequency Podcast Network

    • Daily News
    • 5.0, 13 Ratings

An in-depth look at the issues, culture and personalities shaping Canada today.

    Is history at a turning point? How can we meet the moment?

    Is history at a turning point? How can we meet the moment?

    You may have heard the phrase this week, or even just this year, that we are living history right now. The truth is we are always living history, but some of us can afford to ignore it until it boils over.  So what's the historical context for this moment in time? What can we learn from it?



    When racism, police brutality and the rage that comes in response to that are laid bare for the world to see, in the middle of a pandemic everyone wants to know what happens next. Where do we go from here? Is it possible to eliminate racism without dismantling capitalism? And what do we each have to do to steer the course towards a positive ending?



    GUEST: Andray Domise, contributing editor, Maclean's; Nathanson Fellow (History), York University

    • 27 min
    U of T medical school’s first Black female valedictorian graduates, and leaves behind a legacy of activism

    U of T medical school’s first Black female valedictorian graduates, and leaves behind a legacy of activism

    Chika Stacy Oriuwa graduated from the University of Toronto's faculty of medicine on Tuesday as valedictorian—the first black woman in the faculty's history to receive the honour. She is also the only black student in her class of 259. But thanks to her advocacy and the university's willingness to work with her, the medical school class accepted for next year has 24 Black students, the highest number in the school's history.



    Oriuwa's story is inspiring, but it also highlights just how many systemic barriers face Black students in Canada as they take aim at the highest levels of education. What needs to be done to fix this, and how can other schools and students follow her lead?



    GUEST: Chika Stacy Oriuwa, valedictorian, class of 2020, U of T Faculty of Medicine

    • 27 min
    Police brutality is not just an American problem. What needs to happen here?

    Police brutality is not just an American problem. What needs to happen here?

    There’s a natural instinct a lot of Canadians have to look at the United States and feel better about ourselves. It’s obviously not a great look for us as a country at the best of times. And right now we’re a long long way from the best of times. 



    And anyone looking for examples of police brutality in Canada won’t have to go far. Nobody knows yet exactly what happened when Regis Korchinski-Paquet was alone with two Toronto officers last week. But she fell to her death with them there. Where does police oversight in Canada succeed or fail? What needs to actually happen to make progress, and how can it be done? What are the actual differences in process between us and the United States?



    GUEST: Asha James, human rights lawyer and partner at Falconers, LLP

    • 28 min
    How to be an ally in everyday situations

    How to be an ally in everyday situations

    The images of police killing black men or assaulting protesters are horrifying and disgusting, but they are just the most visible tip of an ugly, ugly iceberg. Before we talk about how far we'll really have to go to change a culture of police brutality, we're going to talk about what each of us, especially those with privilege, should be ready to do right now.



    Many of us won't be in harm's way on the front lines of a protest—but we also miss the many chances we have to be an ally when it can make a difference. Today, we revisit a conversation about what keeps us quiet or still when racists, sexist and homophobic acts occur in front of us, and how we can change that. Until tomorrow, stay safe and help each other out.



    GUEST: Shakil Choudhury, Anima Leadership



     

    • 22 min
    Investigating the Toronto Blessing: A beautiful mystery

    Investigating the Toronto Blessing: A beautiful mystery

    On January 20th, 1994, strange things started happening at a small Christian church in Toronto, Canada. Worshipers found themselves laughing, shaking, falling, rolling around on the ground. That was only the beginning. How did the church suddenly become one of Toronto’s ‘Top Tourist Attractions’? Was something supernatural truly happening? Did gold teeth miraculously appear in people’s mouths?



    Tara Jean Stevens was a teenager when this bizarre movement spread from Toronto to her childhood church on the other side of the country. More than 25 years later, her new podcast, Heaven Bent, searches for the truth behind the miracles and explores big questions of faith and feeling. The first episode was released today, and you can find it right here.



    GUEST: Tara Jean Stevens, host and creator of Heaven Bent

    • 20 min
    Hannah Georgas on what it’s like being a musician in the COVID-19 era

    Hannah Georgas on what it’s like being a musician in the COVID-19 era

    Imagine you're a Canadian musician about to go international. You've been working your way up the charts, year by year, with awards, acclaimed albums, and bigger and bigger tours. You've now got a new album on the way and a full European tour planned. You're ready for this to be the biggest year of your career. And it's February 2020...



    The music industry has been 'disrupted' a whole bunch of times in recent years, but never have the lives of the people who make the music and the thousands of people who make the magic happen been changed like this. When will live shows return? When would you feel comfortable at a packed concert? How do non-superstar artists survive without tour income? And how well can living room concerts replicate the intimacy of a killer live show?



    GUEST: Hannah Georgas, pop rock singer/songwriter

    • 18 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
13 Ratings

13 Ratings

seymour scagnetti ,

Sherman Murder Investigation

Love this podcast, the Toronto Star
Reporter has been on this case almost from the day of the murder.
His determination in tracking down
people and getting the facts out really makes his observations stand out compared to other researchers.
Tedious long drawn out sleuthing is what makes his reporting important as he reveals many of the lesser known facts about this case. This is a must listen to murder mystery aficionados.

jfra1379 ,

Looking forward to this.

Has a bit of a feeling like “The Daily” by the New York Times, but Canadian in focus.

If indeed that’s what’s the producers are going for (and I hope so, because I *love* The Daily), this will be a successful podcast!

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