19 episodes

Crazy Smart Asia lifts the lid on the unexpected stories behind some of Asia’s boldest disruptors. Every week we talk with a young leader about the crazy-smart approaches they’re taking to achieve success and tackle some of the biggest issues facing Asia today.

Crazy Smart Asia Generation T

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

Crazy Smart Asia lifts the lid on the unexpected stories behind some of Asia’s boldest disruptors. Every week we talk with a young leader about the crazy-smart approaches they’re taking to achieve success and tackle some of the biggest issues facing Asia today.

    BONUS EPISODE: Designer Yong Bae Seok On Why We Need A Global Design Philosophy

    BONUS EPISODE: Designer Yong Bae Seok On Why We Need A Global Design Philosophy

    Gen.T’s podcast Crazy Smart Asia explores the unexpected stories of Asia’s disruptors.
    We’ll be back in the new year with Season Three, but in the interim we have a special one-off conversation we wanted to share with you.
    Gen.T has been collaborating with Tod’s this year, specifically the brand’s No_Code line, a new hybrid footwear concept for the visionaries shaping our future, created by Korean designer Yong Bae Seok.
    There are plenty of parallels between the purpose of Yong Bae’s No_Code line and Gen.T’s mission to recognise and help increase the impact of Asia’s most promising young leaders, which is why we seized the opportunity to speak to Yong Bae.
    In this mini episode, Gen.T’s Tamara Lamunière speaks with Yong Bae about sustainability in fashion, the future of footwear, and why we need a global design philosophy.

    • 21 min
    Musician and Actor Nadine Lustre On Music, Fame And Mental Health

    Musician and Actor Nadine Lustre On Music, Fame And Mental Health

    Gen.T’s podcast Crazy Smart Asia explores the unexpected stories of Asia’s disruptors.
    One in four people will struggle with depression and other mental health issues at some point in their lives. For entrepreneurs, that number doubles to one in two.
    As we approach the third year of the pandemic, with the added stress, uncertainty and loss we’ve all felt still bubbling beneath the surface, now more than ever we need to be mindful of our mental health.
    For Nadine Lustre, it starts with awareness. The actor, singer, activist and entrepreneur has long been vocal about her own mental health battles, in the hope of ending the stigma around the subject in her native Philippines.
    And then, everything changed for Nadine. Her brother, who was also battling his own demons, took his own life, leaving Nadine to ask if there was anything more she could have done to help him.
    In response, she’s doubled down, working with other public figures to launch startup MindYou, which aims to make mental health more accessible and cheaper in the Philippines. She’s also been increasingly forthright in sharing her own struggles with depression, to spread the message to people at their lowest that they’re not alone, that help is available—including a major revelation in this episode that she’s never shared publicly before.
    In a candid conversation, Nadine lays everything on the table, discussing music, fame and the mantra that helps her get through the toughest times.

    RUNNING ORDER:
    - Introduction from Gen.T’s regional managing director, Tamara Lamunière
    - Quickfire round (2m 00s)
    - Who is Nadine Lustre? (4m 30s)
    - Dealing with childhood fame (5m 50s)
    - Identity crisis (9m 30s)
    - Dealing with the pressures of fame (11m 40s)
    - Standing up food yourself (14m 00s)
    - Helping people get access to care with MindYou (17m 30s)
    - Battling the stigma around mental health (19m 10s)
    - Coping after her brother’s suicide (24m 50s)
    - Suicidal thoughts (27m 50s)
    - The power of sharing your experiences (30m 20s)
    - Social media and mental health (32m 50s)
    - Innovating with new formats and styles of music (36m 20s)
    - Interview with Grace Tam, Chief Investment Adviser, Hong Kong at BNP Paribas Wealth Management (40m 40s)
    - The success difference (44m 00s)
    - A question no one has ever asked (45m 20s)
    - Final thought (49m 20s)

    If you’re struggling with depression or suicidal thoughts, please remember that help is always at hand. Refer to this list of suicide crisis lines around the world to get help wherever you are.

    • 50 min
    Prenetics Co-Founder Danny Yeung On The Less Glamorous Side Of Entrepreneurship

    Prenetics Co-Founder Danny Yeung On The Less Glamorous Side Of Entrepreneurship

    Gen.T’s podcast Crazy Smart Asia explores the unexpected stories of Asia’s disruptors.
    In 2020, serial entrepreneur Danny Yeung was hitting his stride with his startup Prenetics, seeing success with its consumer-facing genetic testing brand, Circle DNA. And then Covid hit.
    Realising he had the labs, the talent and the tenacity to help, Danny quickly pivoted the business. To date, Prenetics has conducted more than six million Covid-19 tests globally, helping to curb the spread of the virus and keep the world running during the pandemic.
    The company’s successful pivot led to breakneck growth and a surging valuation. In September this year, Prenetics announced it would become the first unicorn company from Hong Kong to publicly list, via a SPAC merger that will put the company on the Nasdaq at a valuation of US$1.7 billion.
    So how did Danny go from trailblazing entrepreneur to Hong Kong’s hero of the pandemic? How did he manage the rapid growth, and what were the key decisions that led to his success? In this episode, we discuss the answers to these questions and more.

    RUNNING ORDER:
    - Introduction from Gen.T’s regional managing director, Tamara Lamunière
    - Quickfire round (2m 30s)
    - Who is Danny Yeung? (4m 20s)
    - Childhood in San Francisco (5m 35s)
    - A strong work ethic (9m 30s)
    - Why passion is important (10m 20s)
    - The less glamorous side of entrepreneurship (13m 10s)
    - Where Danny’s passion is directed (17m 50s)
    - Leadership traits (19m 10s)
    - Being a hands-on CEO (21m 00s)
    - Finding time to build a network (22m 00s)
    - Are good leaders less agreeable? (23m 40s)
    - Interview with Prashant Bhayani, Chief Investment Officer, Asia Pacific at BNP Paribas Wealth Management (25m 10s)
    - Not following a roadmap (28m 20s)
    - Jumping from e-commerce to digital health (30m 10s)
    - The Covid pivot (31m 00s)- Managing rapid growth (36m 30s)
    - What’s next? (39m 10s)
    - His last company (41m 20s)
    - The success difference (43m 10s)

    • 45 min
    Lynk Founder Peggy Choi On The Permanent Beta Mindset

    Lynk Founder Peggy Choi On The Permanent Beta Mindset

    Crazy Smart Asia explores the unexpected stories of Asia’s disruptors.
    When was the last time you needed quick access to expertise to help you move forward? If you’re running a business, maybe the question should be when was the last time today?
    Whether you’re running an SME or a global multinational, all leaders need tailored business intelligence to help them chart the right course. In today’s hyper-connected world, where everyone has access to millions of data points, having the right insights can mean the difference between failure and success.
    Which explains why entrepreneur Peggy Choi’s knowledge-as-a-service platform Lynk has grown so rapidly, doubling its workforce to 250 people across eight countries in the last two years, and raising US$29 million in a Series B round earlier in 2021.
    But even when you have more than 840,000 experts in your network, there are still some things you have to figure out on your own—like how to build a company culture over Zoom, how to navigate early fundraising rounds as a female founder, and how to grow as a leader, and a person, at the same breakneck speed as your company.
    Peggy discusses how she overcame these hurdles and more in a contemplative conversation with Gen.T’s Lee Williamson. On top of that, the pair also discuss skateboards, the importance of a “permanent beta” mindset, and why founders always need to be mindful of the… toilet paper?

    RUNNING ORDER:
    - Introduction from Gen.T’s regional managing director, Tamara Lamunière
    - Quickfire round (1m 50s)
    - Coming up with the idea for Lynk (4m 20s)
    - Taking the leap into entrepreneurship (7m 20s)
    - Measuring success on your own terms (9m 00s)
    - Growing as a person as your business grows (10m 10s)
    - Adaptive leadership (11m 40s)
    - How stress levels change (14m 00s)
    - The value of connections (15m 00s)
    - Being a sole founder (16m 00s)
    - Toughest setbacks faced (17m 30s)
    - Finding the right people (19m 40s)
    - Growing pains (22m 00s)
    - Building company culture through Zoom (23m 30s)
    - Permanent beta (26m 10s)
    - Getting VCs on board in the early days (29m 10s)
    - Interview with Lemuel Lee, BNP Paribas Wealth Management’s Head of Hong Kong Market, about the power of connections (30m 10s)
    - Skills you need as a founder (34m 00s)
    - Bootstrapping in the early stage (35m 30s)
    - The first customer call (36m 30s)
    - Would you go the venture route again? (39m 00s)
    - Raising money as a female founder (40m 10s)
    - Always strive for excellence (42m 40s)
    - Give yourself space (45m 20s)
    - How art influenced Peggy as an entrepreneur (46m 40s)
    - Final thought (48m 00s)

    • 49 min
    Green Monday Founder David Yeung On Vision, Community And The Value Of Failure

    Green Monday Founder David Yeung On Vision, Community And The Value Of Failure

    Gen.T’s podcast Crazy Smart Asia explores the unexpected stories of Asia’s disruptors.
    Twenty years ago, David Yeung became a vegetarian. He was mocked; his family asked him why. He had no idea it would change his life forever.
    In 2012, he founded Green Monday, a social venture and advocacy organisation, to tackle the looming issues around climate change, food insecurity and public health. Even his closest friends doubted his business model.
    A few years later, he created Green Common, a plant-based grocery store that now has 15 outlets across Asia, following it with the launch of OmniPork, now OmniFoods, which produces plant-based meat alternatives that focus on the tastes and demands of the Asian market.
    Today, Green Monday is the leader in Asia’s rapidly growing alternative protein industry. In 2020, it raised US$70 million in its fourth fundraising round, the largest raise for an alt-protein startup in Asia to date, with celebrity investors including James Cameron, Mary McCartney and Susan Rockefeller.
    Above all, the company is making good on David’s promise of tackling some of the biggest challenges facing the planet today. Needless to say, they’re not mocking now.
    In a breathless conversation that covered so much ground, we discussed the difficult early days, the future of the alt-protein industry, and how he went from running a chain of grocery stores to creating a global food tech giant.

    RUNNING ORDER:
    - Introduction from Gen.T’s regional managing director, Tamara Lamunière
    - Quickfire questions (1m 50s)
    - Turning a passion into a business (5m 10s)
    - The decision to act (9m 10s)
    - The next five years of plant-based innovation (10m 20s)
    - This is just the beginning (14m 40s)
    - From grocery stores to food tech (16m 50s)
    - Using the stores to collect consumer data (19m 0s)
    - The importance of planning and patience (20m 20s)
    - Building a community and ecosystem (21m 20s)
    - The early days were the hardest (22m 20s)
    - Self-belief and perseverance (23m 40s)
    - Interview with Lemuel Lee, BNP Paribas Wealth Management’s Head of Hong Kong Market, about the growth of the alternative protein industry in Asia (26m 20s)
    - A rising tide lifts all ships (28m 50s)
    - Don’t build a company to chase funding (31m 40s)
    - The value of failure (35m 10s)
    - Final thought (38m 20s)

    • 39 min
    Billionaire Business Leader And Philanthropist Binod Chaudhary On Risk, Sacrifice And Family

    Billionaire Business Leader And Philanthropist Binod Chaudhary On Risk, Sacrifice And Family

    Crazy Smart Asia explores the unexpected stories of Asia’s disruptors.
    This week, Gen.T’s Tamara Lamunière is in the interviewer’s chair for the episode, talking with entrepreneur, philanthropist and Nepal’s only billionaire, Binod Chaudhary.
    Binod is the chairman of CG Corp Global, a multinational conglomerate that comprises over 160 companies—with interests in everything from education to hospitality—employing more than 15,000 people.
    Aside from his business success, Binod has an active public life. He’s served as a member of Nepal’s parliament for a number of years, and his non-profit, The Chaudhary Foundation, is dedicated to the sustainable development of Nepal.
    Among other topics, the two discuss navigating the hurdles unique to a family business, the importance of a risk appetite and the one key trait you need for business success that you won’t get from an MBA.

    RUNNING ORDER:
    - Taking over the family business at a young age (1m 50s)
    - What you won’t learn at business school (5m 40s)
    - Can you cultivate entrepreneurial skills? (7m 30s)
    - Using your gut (9m 20s)
    - The importance of a risk appetite (10m 40s)
    - How to learn as a business leader (14m 10s)
    - The issues unique to a family business (18m 00s)
    - Interview with Anton Wong, BNP Paribas Wealth Management’s Head of Taiwan Market, about the challenges facing next-gen business leaders (23m 40s)
    - The importance of a strong network (26m 30s)
    - The five pillars of a successful life (28m 10s)
    - Putting a long-term vision in place (31m 40s)
    - The value of sacrificing (34m 50s)

    • 37 min

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