74 episodes

The Stanford Psychology Podcast invites leading psychologists to talk about what’s on their mind lately. Join Eric Neumann, Anjie Cao, Kate Petrova, Bella Fascendini, and Joseph Outa as they chat with their guests about their latest exciting work. Every week, an episode will bring you new findings from psychological science and how they can be applied to everyday life. The opinions and views expressed in this podcast represent those of the speaker and not necessarily Stanford's. Subscribe at stanfordpsypod.substack.com. Let us hear your thoughts at stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com. Follow us on Twitter @StanfordPsyPod. Visit our website https://stanfordpsychologypodcast.com. Soundtrack: Corey Zhou (UCSD). Logo: Sarah Wu (Stanford)

Stanford Psychology Podcast Stanford Psychology

    • Science
    • 4.3 • 31 Ratings

The Stanford Psychology Podcast invites leading psychologists to talk about what’s on their mind lately. Join Eric Neumann, Anjie Cao, Kate Petrova, Bella Fascendini, and Joseph Outa as they chat with their guests about their latest exciting work. Every week, an episode will bring you new findings from psychological science and how they can be applied to everyday life. The opinions and views expressed in this podcast represent those of the speaker and not necessarily Stanford's. Subscribe at stanfordpsypod.substack.com. Let us hear your thoughts at stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com. Follow us on Twitter @StanfordPsyPod. Visit our website https://stanfordpsychologypodcast.com. Soundtrack: Corey Zhou (UCSD). Logo: Sarah Wu (Stanford)

    73 - Juliana Schroeder: Mistakenly Seeking Solitude

    73 - Juliana Schroeder: Mistakenly Seeking Solitude

    Eric chats with Juliana Schroeder, Associate Professor in the Management of Organizations at Berkeley Haas. She studies how people think about the minds of other people, and how they are often wrong trying to understand what others are up to. Her work has been discussed in outlets ranging from Vice to The Atlantic and Forbes.
    In this episode, Eric and Juliana chat review her exciting recent work on “undersociality.” Talking to other people is often meaningful, not just for extraverts, and yet we hesitate to talk to others, making overly pessimistic predictions about how awkward and unpleasant such interactions would be. This leads us to “mistakenly seek solitude.” Juliana discusses what we can do to motivate ourselves to talk to others more, why that is so beneficial, and why she herself struggles to do it.

    WE NOW HAVE A SUBSTACK! Stay up to date with the pod and become part of the ever-growing community :) https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    If you found this episode interesting at all, consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.

    Links:
    Juliana's review paper on undersociality: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364661322000432?casa_token=KI1Vjeg9NKUAAAAA:aTAEDP2eF1ay3I0rGI74FHNW21s83r_KvXCQMvr5auCxaVnhEah82tbASwjzwfc-68D54q8Kc2E 
    Juliana's key empirical paper: https://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037/a0037323 
    Juliana's Twitter

    Eric's website
    Eric's Twitter @EricNeumannPsy

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod
    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you think of this episode, or of the podcast! :) stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com

    • 46 min
    72 - Maria Arredondo: When babies need to learn two languages

    72 - Maria Arredondo: When babies need to learn two languages

    Anjie chats with Dr. Maria Arredondo, Assistant Professor at the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, and the Department of Psychology at University of Texas at Austin. Maria studies how infants, toddlers, and school-age children acquire their language(s). She is especially interested in why some children can become proficient bilinguals, while others struggle. 

    In this episode, Anjie and Maria discuss how learning two languages simultaneously can influence babies’ cognitive development. Maria also shared her journey in doing infant research and the challenges and joys of studying babies’ brains.
     
    If you found this episode interesting at all, subscribe to our Substack and consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.
     
    Links:


    Maria’s paper: 
    Arredondo, M. M., Aslin, R. N., Zhang, M., & Werker, J. F. (2022). Attentional orienting abilities in bilinguals: Evidence from a large infant sample. Infant Behavior and Development, 66, 101683.
     
    Arredondo, M. M., Aslin, R. N., & Werker, J. F. (2022). Bilingualism alters infants’ cortical organization for attentional orienting mechanisms. Developmental Science, 25(2), e13172.
     
    Maria’s Twitter @MMArredondo_
    Maria’s lab website: https://sites.utexas.edu/childslab/
     
    Anjie’s: website: anjiecao.github.io
    Anjie’s Twitter @anjie_cao
     
    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod
    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/
     
    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com

    • 40 min
    71 - Tessa West: Dealing with Toxic Coworkers

    71 - Tessa West: Dealing with Toxic Coworkers

    Eric chats with Tessa West, Associate Professor of Psychology at New York University. Tessa is a leading expert in the science of interpersonal communication. Her work has been covered by various outlets such as the New York Times and Time Magazine. She is most recently the author of “Jerks at Work: Toxic coworkers and what to do about them.”
    In this episode, Eric and Tessa chat about why some people are jerks at work. How do you deal with them? Are there more jerks at work now than in the past? Can we find jerks in all cultures around the world? How can we detect jerks? Who is most likely to be taken advantage of by jerks at work? On the flipside of jerks, how can you turn coworkers into friends? Finally, Tessa talks about what it was like to write a trade book, whether that is harder than writing scientific papers, and how she tries to be optimistic about people despite this dark research topic.

    WE NOW HAVE A SUBSTACK! Stay up to date with the pod and become part of the ever-growing community :) https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/
    If you found this episode interesting at all, consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.

    Links:
    Tessa's book
    Tessa's website
    Tessa's Twitter @TessaWestNYU

    Eric's website
    Eric's Twitter @EricNeumannPsy

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod
    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you think of this episode, or of the podcast! :) stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com

    • 50 min
    70 - Julia Leonard: Young children's effort allocation and persistence in learning

    70 - Julia Leonard: Young children's effort allocation and persistence in learning

    Bella chats with professor Julia Leonard. Julia is an assistant professor in the department of psychology at Yale University, where she directs the Leonard Learning Lab. Julia and her lab use cognitive, developmental, and computational approaches to study the factors that support both children's approach to learning and their capacity to learn. 
    In this episode, we discussed Julia's recent research on young children's persistence and the role that caretakers and teachers play in influencing the growth of children's persistence. Although the studies were done with children, you'll be surprised by how much insight her research can bring to all of us, even as adults! We also discussed the challenges we face in children's education and fostering environments that encourage the growth of children's persistence. In the end, Julia shares her personal stories about applying to graduate school and some important advice to anyone interested in pursuing a career in academia.

    WE NOW HAVE A SUBSTACK! Stay up to date with the pod and become part of the ever-growing community :) https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/
    If you found this episode interesting, please consider leaving us a good rating! It only takes a second, but it will allow our podcast to reach more people and hopefully get them excited about psychology.
    Links:
    Julia's paper on young children's persistence
    Julia's Twitter: @julia_a_leonard
    Leonard Learning Lab Twitter: @LeonardLearnLab
    Bella's website: https://bellafascendini.github.io/
    Bella's Twitter @BellaFascendini
    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod
    Let us know what you think of this episode or the podcast! :) stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com

    • 53 min
    69 - Robin Dunbar: How Many People Can You Be Friends With?

    69 - Robin Dunbar: How Many People Can You Be Friends With?

    Eric chats with Robin Dunbar, Emeritus Professor of Evolutionary Psychology at Oxford. Robin has famously studied the evolution of the human brain, arguing that our brain developed to understand the complex social world we have created for ourselves. Most know him for “Dunbar’s number,” or the limit to the number of individuals we can maintain stable relationships with. Robin has received more awards than could be counted, including the prestigious Huxley Memorial Medal. He has written various books, most relevant for this conversation a book called “Friends: Understanding the Power of our Most Important Relationship.”
    In this wide-ranging episode, Eric and Robin discuss why Dunbar’s number is actually a whole series of numbers. Robin explains how he arrived at this number, why it is so relevant to everything from our globalized world and big cities to maintaining friendships. Do psychopaths need friends to be happy? If you don’t like people, should you move into the woods and never talk to anyone again? He explains why we gossip and what makes something funny. Finally, he shares some personal stories about his career and why his discovery of Dunbar’s number was actually an accident.

    WE NOW HAVE A SUBSTACK! Stay up to date with the pod and become part of the ever-growing community :) https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/
    If you found this episode interesting at all, consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.

    Links:
    Robin's Friendship book: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/friends-robin-dunbar/1138785864
    Robin's most recent book on religion: https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/316135/how-religion-evolved-by-dunbar-robin/9780241431788

    Eric's website
    Eric's Twitter @EricNeumannPsy

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod
    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you think of this episode, or of the podcast! :) stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com

    • 1 hr 12 min
    68 - Special Episode: Join the BTS Conference! (Big Team Science, not the K-pop band.)

    68 - Special Episode: Join the BTS Conference! (Big Team Science, not the K-pop band.)

    Next Thursday and Friday, October 27th and 28th, the first-ever Big Team Science Conference (BTS-CON for short) will be held virtually. The goal of BTSCON is to bring multidisciplinary groups of researchers, funders, and stakeholders to discuss advancements, challenges, and future opportunities related to big team science. The conference program spans two days, including a mixture of symposia, panels, hackathons, and talks. If you are new to this topic, you will find this episode particularly relevant. In this episode that aired earlier this year, Anjie chats with Dr. Nicholas Coles, the Director of Psychological Science Accelerator and one of the many amazing organizers behind BTSCON. They talked a little bit about what big team science is, and what are some real challenges that BTS practitioners would encounter.

    WE NOW HAVE A SUBSTACK! Stay up to date with the pod and become part of the ever-growing community :) https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/
    If you found this episode interesting at all, consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.

    Links:
    BTSCON official page: https://bigteamscienceconference.github.io/
    Register now: https://opencollective.com/psysciacc/events/test-event-23392c94/contribute/registration-2022-big-team-science-conference-40278
    Full conference program: https://docs.google.com/document/d/17m6t7or53uvFErIW_WHvegwlwV2Cq_rvG5ny-4cBkpM/edit?usp=sharing
    The paper discussed: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00150-2%0D?error=server_error

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod
    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/
    Let us know what you think of this episode, or of the podcast! :) stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com

    • 40 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
31 Ratings

31 Ratings

lauren borchers ,

The hosts ROCK!

Highly informative and engaging podcast with engaging talks! 10/10 recommend.

The Page Master ,

I love Psychology

I am studying psychology in college and majoring in it. I love this podcast and the guest and psychologists that speak on it. Very informative and I really enjoy it thank you.

Sblanco01 ,

Recommend

I enjoy listening to Eric interviewing the guests .

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