500 episodes

Podcast by Philosophy Talk Starters

Philosophy Talk Starter‪s‬ Philosophy Talk Starters

    • Education
    • 4.0 • 47 Ratings

Podcast by Philosophy Talk Starters

    519: What Has Replaced Freud?

    519: What Has Replaced Freud?

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/what-has-replaced-freud.

    Although the concept that we can have thoughts and desires hidden from consciousness can be traced back to antiquity, it was Freud who truly popularized it in the twentieth century. Now Freud’s theory of the unconscious mind has mostly been abandoned for being unscientific and lacking in empirical evidence. So what has replaced it? Are newer theories that reference “automatic systems” or “implicit attitudes” any more scientific than Freud’s? And why is so much research about the unconscious mind being conducted in business schools? Josh and Ray are quite conscious of their guest, Blakey Vermeule from Stanford University, author of "The New Unconscious: A Literary Guided Tour."

    • 10 min
    180: John Rawls

    180: John Rawls

    More at http://philosophytalk.org/shows/john-rawls.

    John Rawls was one of the most influential political philosophers of the twentieth century. In his book "A Theory of Justice" he articulated a concept of justice as fairness, which won many fans among liberals, and provoked important responses from thoughtful libertarians such as Robert Nozick. Ken and John explore Rawls' ideas with one of his students, Joshua Cohen from UC Berkeley (formerly of Stanford University).

    • 10 min
    280: What Is Love?

    280: What Is Love?

    More at http://philosophytalk.org/shows/what-love.

    It may seem doubtful that philosophers have much to tell us about love (beyond their love of wisdom). Surely it is the poets who have the market cornered when it comes to deep reflection on the nature of love. John and Ken question the notion that love cannot be captured by the light of reason by turning their attention to the philosophy of love with philosopher-poet Troy Jollimore from CSU Chico. Troy is the author of "Love’s Vision," as well as two collections of poems: "At Lake Scugog" and 2006's "Tom Thomson in Purgatory," which won the National Book Critics Circle Award.

    • 10 min
    80: W.E.B. Du Bois

    80: W.E.B. Du Bois

    More at http://philosophytalk.org/shows/web-du-bois.

    Sociologist, historian, philosopher, editor, writer, and activist, W.E.B. DuBois was one of the most influential intellectuals of the twentieth century. The first African-American Ph.D. from Harvard University, DuBois died in Ghana after having renounced his American citizenship. In between he co-founded the NAACP and wrote "The Souls of Black Folk" (1903) as well as a number of other influential books that had a decisive impact on the development of African-American culture in the twentieth century. John and Ken discuss DuBois' life and thought with Lucius Outlaw from Vanderbilt University, author of "On Race and Philosophy."

    • 8 min
    518: The Rhetoric of Big Tech

    518: The Rhetoric of Big Tech

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/rhetoric-big-tech.

    Big Tech is known for its "disruption" of established industries and changing fundamental aspects of our lives from shopping and delivery to communication and transit. While many welcome these changes, there are also worries about privacy, fairness, and deregulation. So how do tech companies think about what it is they are doing and what justifies it? Who are their philosophical sources, and do they use them responsibly? What role does New Age thinking, Ayn Rand, Martin Heidegger, and even Samuel Beckett play in shaping the rhetoric of big tech? Josh and Ray debug the code with Adrian Daub from Stanford University, author of "What Tech Calls Thinking: An Inquiry into the Intellectual Bedrock of Silicon Valley."

    • 10 min
    455: Trolling, Bullying, and Flame Wars - Humility and Online Discourse

    455: Trolling, Bullying, and Flame Wars - Humility and Online Discourse

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/trolling-bullying-and-flame-wars.

    Open up any online comments section and you’ll find them: internet trolls, from the mildly inflammatory to the viciously bullying. It seems that the ease of posting online leads many to abandon any semblance of intellectual humility. So can we have intellectual humility on an anonymous forum with little oversight and accountability? Does current online behavior portend the end of humility in the public domain? How do we encourage greater humility and less arrogance in any public discourse? The Philosophers open up the comments section for Michael Lynch from the University of Connecticut, author of "The Internet of Us: Knowing More and Understanding Less in the Age of Big Data."

    • 11 min

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5
47 Ratings

47 Ratings

idamae poopsnatch ,

Here is the reason you must pay $

I, too, was irked by these teaser shorts. I was even more irked to learn one must subscribe and pay $ to hear full podcasts and access archives. However, I emailed the show and received an explanation: Stanford U doesn’t pay a cent to support this show. Further, there is a restriction on advertising because the show is recorded on the campus. Thus, their only choice was to make it available by subscription. The cost is reasonable in the Scheme of All Things, about $6 to $8 monthly depending on the length you choose. I have blown a lot more on worse things.

Jason S Woodrow ,

Couple Minutes Not Worth It

It hurts me to rate this so poorly. I get that you have to make money and are restricted on advertising. But, c’mon! Find a way to get it done so you can put a full episode up and not just a few minutes. Is the restriction because you record on campus? Then record off campus. Or whatever works. This method of putting up a couple minutes and then wanting us to search elsewhere for a paid download is awful. It adds so much friction to the process that it grinds to a halt. It could be a really interesting podcast, but I’m afraid I’m so discouraged with this process that I’m just deleting it from my playlist. Again, it’s painful because I think the content can be excellent. But I have about ten minutes a week to download a few hours of podcasts, and there’s just too much quality stuff out there that requires a single click and is frictionless.

1sinawhile ,

why no full episodes?

Phil Talk is superb -- but why can't full episodes be downloaded. The short segments are teases.

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