280 episodes

Interview with Philosophers about their New Books
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New Books in Philosophy New Books Network

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.4 • 84 Ratings

Interview with Philosophers about their New Books
Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/philosophy

    Mona Simion, "Shifty Speech and Independent Thought: Epistemic Normativity in Context" (Oxford UP, 2021)

    Mona Simion, "Shifty Speech and Independent Thought: Epistemic Normativity in Context" (Oxford UP, 2021)

    At the intersection of epistemology and philosophy of language is a puzzle. First, it seems we don’t need less evidence for a claim that we know something if the practical importance of the knowledge claim shifts. Second, it seems we shouldn’t assert that we know something if we don’t. Third, it seems that if the practical importance of a knowledge claim shifts, we should back up our claim with more evidence. So is knowledge really insensitive to shifts in practical stakes? Or should the knowledge norm of assertion be abandoned? 
    In Shifty Speech and Independent Thought (Oxford University Press, 2021), Mona Simion critically considers various types of responses to the Shiftiness Dilemma before defending her own solution. On her view, assertions obey both epistemic and non-epistemic norms, and what is permissible to assert shifts depending on all-things-considered judgments that rely on a contextually determined mix of these norms. Simion, who is lecturer in philosophy at the University of Glasgow, generalizes her approach to other types of epistemically relevant speech acts, and argues that only moral assertion requires special treatment, due to differences in audience understanding.
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    • 1 hr 11 min
    Gregg D. Caruso, "Rejecting Retributivism: Free Will, Punishment, and Criminal Justice" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

    Gregg D. Caruso, "Rejecting Retributivism: Free Will, Punishment, and Criminal Justice" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

    According to an intuitive view, those who commit crimes are justifiably subject to punishment. Depending on the severity of the wrongdoing constitutive of the crime, punishment can be severe: incarceration, confinement, depravation, and so on. The common thought is that in committing serious crimes, persons render themselves deserving of punishment by the State. Punishment, then, is simply a matter of giving offenders their just deserts. Call this broad view retributivism. What if retributivism’s underlying idea of desert is fundamentally confused? What if persons lack the kind of free will that would make them deserving of punishment in the sense that retributivism requires?
    This is the central question of Gregg Caruso’s new book, Rejecting Retributivism: Free Will, Punishment, and Criminal Justice (Cambridge, 2021). After arguing against the idea that persons can be deserving of punishment in the retributivist’s sense, Caruso develops an alternative approach to criminal behavior that he called the Public-Health Quarantine Model.
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    • 1 hr 9 min
    Arindam Chakrabarti. "Realisms Interlinked: Objects, Subjects, and Other Subjects" (Bloomsbury, 2019)

    Arindam Chakrabarti. "Realisms Interlinked: Objects, Subjects, and Other Subjects" (Bloomsbury, 2019)

    Arindam Chakrabarti’s Realisms Interlinked: Objects, Subjects, and Other Subjects (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019), not only brings together his wide-ranging research from the past three decades, but brings together Indian philosophers with analytic philosophers in an extended reflection on metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind and language. He takes up these topics under the three broad categories of objects, subjects, and other subjects, investigating where arguments for the existence of ordinary objects might lead us: towards accepting the reality and perceptibility of universals and the existence of immaterial yet embodied selves. Chakrabarti’s arguments engage with well-known analytic thinkers like Russell, Strawson, and Dummett, along with well-known Indian thinkers like Śaṅkara, Nāgārjuna, and Uddyotakara, though always for the purpose of philosophical progress, not mere comparison or historical exegesis.
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    • 1 hr 12 min
    Samantha Matherne, "Cassirer" (Routledge, 2021)

    Samantha Matherne, "Cassirer" (Routledge, 2021)

    Ernst Cassirer (1874-1945) was a leading neo-Kantian who developed a systematic view of how we construct and experience culture, widely construed to include mathematics, science, religion, myth, art, politics, ethics and other social endeavors. In Cassirer (Routledge 2021), Samantha Matherne explains how Cassirer updates Kant to develop his critical idealism in the form of a distinction between substance and function – the mind-dependent objects we cognize, and the structure of our minds that these objects depend on. He uses this view in his broad philosophy of symbolic forms, unpacking the way we build up the cultural world around us and our lived experience in that cultural world. Matherne, who is an assistant professor of philosophy at Harvard University, brings Cassirer’s work to life for those beyond his contemporary influences in the metaphysics of science, the philosophy of art, and the insertion of myth into the politics of fascism.
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    • 1 hr 8 min
    Jennifer Lackey, "The Epistemology of Groups" (Oxford UP, 2021)

    Jennifer Lackey, "The Epistemology of Groups" (Oxford UP, 2021)

    We commonly ascribe beliefs and similar attitudes to groups. For instance, we say that a foreign government believes that members of the press are spies, or that a corporation denies that its product is harmful to the environment. Sometimes, it seems that in such cases, we are simply ascribing to the group the shared beliefs of its members. But there are other cases in which it appears we are referencing an independent subject of the belief or attitude – the government or the corporation, over and above its members. Puzzles abound.
    In The Epistemology of Groups (Oxford 2021), Jennifer Lackey develops a unified account of group belief, justified group belief, group knowledge, and group assertion. Intriguingly, this account serves ultimately to allow us to make sense of group lies.
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    • 1 hr 2 min
    Perry Zurn, "Curiosity and Power: The Politics of Inquiry" (U of Minnesota Press, 2021)

    Perry Zurn, "Curiosity and Power: The Politics of Inquiry" (U of Minnesota Press, 2021)

    Is curiosity political? Does it have a philosophical lineage? In Curiosity and Power: The Politics of Inquiry (University of Minnesota Press, 2021), Perry Zurn shows, consequentially, yes. He further asks: Who can be curious? How? When? To what effect? What happens when we are curious together? 
    Engaged with multiple social movements ranging from the mid-twentieth century to our current time, and thinkers of curiosity from the Ancient world until now, Zurn theorizes the normative and political force of curiosity while providing insight into how it has and can be wielded for transformative collective resistance.
    Sarah Tyson is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Colorado, Denver.
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    • 59 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
84 Ratings

84 Ratings

Gaal Dornick ,

Content + / Form -

What the title (and other reviewers) said. I’m a philosophy professor and love the content but, for god’s sake, PLEASE edit out the interviewers incessant “um”s! The only reason that the podcast is bearable is that the interviews speak better.

Selylidne ,

Unrivaled depth for a podcast

Podcasts that interview people and claim to examine complex and interesting topics are a dime a dozen, but 99% of them never go deeper than the surface level version of the topics. The New Books Network is uniquely different, and New Books In Philosophy is the best of the New Books Network.

Listen to this podcast for long, in-depth interviews with people who literally wrote the book investigating a narrow slice of philosophy.

(Oddly, the interviewers frequently voice assumptions that listeners are in or have been in academic philosophy. This is probably not an accurate assumption about the audience, since the podcast is distributed to the general public via iTunes. But that's trivial enough that it's barely even a criticism.)

jess_simp ,

Excellent Philosophy Podcast

Very impressed with the choice of guests and quality of the conversations. This podcast provides excellent introductions to new philosophical works and thought provoking conversations with authors. Keep up the great work!

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