100 episodes

Welcome to The Primal Endurance Podcast, where we challenge the ineffective, overly stressful conventional approach to endurance training and provide a refreshing, sensible, healthy, fun alternative. Going primal frees you from carbohydrate dependency and turns you into a fat burning beast! Enjoy interviews from elite athletes, coaches, authors and scientists on the cutting edge of endurance training and performance.

Primal Endurance Podcast Brad Kearns

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.6 • 128 Ratings

Welcome to The Primal Endurance Podcast, where we challenge the ineffective, overly stressful conventional approach to endurance training and provide a refreshing, sensible, healthy, fun alternative. Going primal frees you from carbohydrate dependency and turns you into a fat burning beast! Enjoy interviews from elite athletes, coaches, authors and scientists on the cutting edge of endurance training and performance.

    Zach Bitter: Fat Adapted Endurance Training And How To Break 100-Mile Records

    Zach Bitter: Fat Adapted Endurance Training And How To Break 100-Mile Records

    I first met this episode’s guest, elite professional ultra-runner Zach Bitter way back in 2016, back when he was first starting, getting himself on the map and dreaming of a career in ultra marathon running—and now look at what’s happened to his career!

    Besides being the national 100k champion and holder of many other titles and records, Zach was an early pioneer in the ultra running scene, and is known for his success at pushing the edges of human performance as a fat adapted endurance athlete. He also hosts the wonderful Human Performance Outliers podcast.

    To get a sense of the level he’s performed at, get this: he set the world record in the 100 mile run (on an indoor track) when he caught the time of 11 hours and 40 minutes. That is an average pace per mile of 6:48. The next time you run, try to see if you can run a 6:48! He also set an amazing record for 100 miles on a treadmill in 12 hours and 18 minutes. You’re going to learn so much from Zach in this show as this absolute endurance machine talks about his background and training, his take on minimalist footwear and the reason why he actually still wears “normal” shoes (and how often). You will also hear him discuss his revolutionary training methods, what he does in order to race more efficiently and recover faster, and much more! Enjoy the show and connect with Zach via his website, linked below.

     

    LINKS:


    Brad Kearns.com
    Brad’s Shopping page
    PrimalEndrance.fit
    ZachBitter.com
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 38 min
    115 Things You Need To Know As A Primal Endurance Athlete, Part 2

    115 Things You Need To Know As A Primal Endurance Athlete, Part 2

    In part 2 of this multi-part presentation covering 115 key insights about the Primal Endurance approach, we discuss the next 15-24 items under the category of Aerobic Training (part 1 introduced the six categories: Aerobic Training, Periodization, Primal Eating, Strength and Sprint Training, Complementary Movement And Lifestyle Practices, and Recovery).

    In this episode, I continue to provide some color commentary on each insight to provide you with more nuanced knowledge of everything you need to know if you want to have fun and go faster. You will learn why high-intensity workouts are not advised until you’ve built a strong aerobic base, why even a slight stimulation of anaerobic metabolism during a workout can compromise your fat reduction efforts, and what causes endurance athletes to be at high risk for overstress and burnout.

    You will also learn which types of workouts can actually improve mitochondrial function and protect you from stress-induced oxidative damage, the benefits of nose breathing during exercise, and why wearing a wireless heart rate monitor is essential to conducting proper aerobic workouts. We also touch on how slowing down to perform better in endurance competitions has actually been proven to be an effective strategy by the world’s leading athletes for over fifty years and the seven habits of highly effective primal endurance athletes (sleep, stress/rest balance, intuitive and personalized schedule, aerobic emphasis, structured intensity, complementary movement and lifestyle practices, and periodization).

     

    TIMESTAMPS:

    High intensity workouts are not advised until a strong aerobic base is built. [01:08]

    If you are constantly dipping into the sugar burning zones, you are going to promote carbohydrate dependency eating and lifestyle patterns. [03:58]

    Besides exceeding maximum aerobic heart rate, some athletes are guilty of an overly consistent regimen. [05:35]

    Aerobic and anaerobic workouts and primal aligned eating help improve mitochrondrial function. [09:18]

    Mitochondria burn fat and ketones more cleanly than they do glucose. [12:42]

    Nose breathing during exercise ensures the most efficient exchange of oxygen on each breath. [14:56]

    The black hole designates an exercise intensity that is slightly too strenuous to be aerobic, but not difficult enough to qualify as a peak performance speed workout. [21:28]

    A wireless heart rate monitor is essential to conducting proper aerobic workouts. [26:20]

    Slowing down to perform better in endurance competition has been proven effective by the world's leading athletes [29:19]

    The seven habits of highly effective primal endurance athletes are sleep, stress, rest, balance, intuitive and personalized training schedule, emphasizing aerobic development. [33:33]

     

    LINKS:


    Brad Kearns.com
    Brad’s Shopping page
    PrimalEndrance.fit
    The Oxygen Advantage
    Breath
    Shift Adapt
    BOHR Effect
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 35 min
    Mark Allen: Appreciating The Process, Overcoming Adversity, And More Zen Master Insights

    Mark Allen: Appreciating The Process, Overcoming Adversity, And More Zen Master Insights

    I caught up with one of my favorite athletes to talk to ever for this episode—someone who has a record six victories at the Hawaii Ironman and ten victories at the Nice, France World Long Course Championship.

    His name is Mark Allen, and he’s also known as the greatest triathlete in history, but today, he is a popular triathlon coach at MarkAllenCoaching.com, a TV commentator, corporate speaker, author, and presenter of “Fit Soul, Fit Body” retreats with Brant Secunda, a Huichol shaman and healer.

    One important takeaway from this show is what a powerful effect releasing your attachment to outcomes and being committed to both the enjoyment and appreciation of the process will have on your life. Mark shares how despite a series of unfortunate setbacks, his first victory in 1989 precipitated five Ironman attempts before he retired at the top of his game at age 39. He also talks about balancing the pursuit of extreme endurance goals with maintaining health, how research on Heart Rate Variability has been a great breakthrough in monitoring stress and planning training, and describes how he was able to live a normal, laidback lifestyle after his grueling training sessions or competitive seasons were over.

    You will also hear about the importance of sleep when training and all about Mark’s new book, The Art of Competition, which blends stunning nature photography with inspirational quotes chosen by Mark for their significance to competitors seeking a healthy perspective and inspiration to pursue athletic goals.

     

    LINKS:


    Brad Kearns.com
    Brad’s Shopping page
    PrimalEndrance.fit
    MarkAllenCoaching.com
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 46 min
    Dave Scott: Hawaii Ironman Reflections, Modern Tech Innovations, And Endurance Performance Nutrition

    Dave Scott: Hawaii Ironman Reflections, Modern Tech Innovations, And Endurance Performance Nutrition

    Dave Scott is a prominent and well-regarded health coach and 6-time IronMan Hawaii champion.

    Highly informed about exercise, training strategies, coaching, diet and physiology, you can’t get any better than Dave when it comes to a knowledgeable source for triathlon training. In this episode, we go deep into important topics like finding a healthy balance between being driven and obsessed with peak performance goals with enjoying the process and celebrating your successes, and not always looking for more more more. We also discuss the technologies and innovations discovered in recent years and end the show with an important discussion about nutrition and what prompted Dave to completely change his diet, what his meals look like today, and protein timing.

     

    TIMESTAMPS:

    Dave Scott and Brad reflect on their histories on the triathlon circuit as well as talk about new innovations in the sport. [00:25]

    Brad asks Dave to reflect back on his awesome six Ironman wins. Would he want to do anything different? [03:57]

    A healthy athlete should have other outlets and hobbies. [11:16:09]

    How has it gone for Dave to transition from the peak years to this stage of his life? [14:34]

    Heart problems are common in endurance athletes. [17:57]

    There have been many changes in the sport of triathlon like equipment, road surfaces, and improvements in training protocol. The shoes are a big problem when we look for a level playing field.  [25:15]

    Some of the stronger competitors for the Ironman are coming from Europe.  Why is that? [32:25]

    Do you have to train beyond the race distance to get the best performance [38:11]

    How do you distinguish between being fit or un-fit? [43:23]

    Nutrition deserves much discussion and understanding. We need to regulate our metabolic rate by having a bigger block of protein. [50:22]

    What about the dangers of over-consumption of protein? [01:01:09]

    Are today’s athletes better informed about diet?  [01:08:20]

    After a tough training day, would you see justification to maximize intake of all macronutrients in the name of recovery? [01:12:0]

    LINKS:


    Brad Kearns.com
    Brad’s Shopping page
    Dave Scott
    PrimalEndrance.fit

     
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 1 hr 18 min
    115 Things You Need To Know As A Primal Endurance Athlete, Part 1 (1-14)

    115 Things You Need To Know As A Primal Endurance Athlete, Part 1 (1-14)

    It’s time to cover 115 things you need to know as a Primal Endurance athlete!

    The 115 things on the list have been divided into six categories (Aerobic Training, Periodization, Primal Eating, Strength and Sprint Training, Complementary Movement And Lifestyle Practices, and Recovery) that will be presented in a series of shows. If you want to see the full list, head over to PrimalEndurance.fit to download a free eBook.

    In part one of this multi-part presentation, I cover items 1-14 under the category of Aerobic Training, offering my color commentary on each item so you have a thorough understanding of everything you need to know to have fun and go faster. This episode reveals why endurance athletes generally tend to carry too much body fat, the fundamental elements of the Primal Endurance approach, and why the conventional approach to endurance training is deeply flawed. You will learn why even the most dedicated athletes still struggle with an excess of body fat, how chronic cardio causes permanent damage to your heart, how moderate exercise schedules actually dramatically increase longevity and why time-consuming training schedules can accelerate aging. You will also learn why emphasizing aerobic workouts delivers the best return on investment for endurance athletes, the importance of developing an efficient aerobic system, and much more!

     

    TIMESTAMPS:

    This is the first of a series putting you on the right track to reach your ambitious goals that support health and hormonal function and longevity. [00:27]

    Endurance athletes, in general, carry too much body fat.  Many endurance athletes also overtrain. [02:47]

    The key factor is to slow down! A heartrate of 180 minus you age is widely promoted. [07:56]

    There are many well-intentioned ideas about how to train, but they may fail to solve problems.  They do not put individuals’ situations into the approach.  [12:08]

    Escape chronic cardio. Every day should find you moving frequently at low level, lifting heavy things once in a while and occasionally sprinting. [15:04]

    The heart is like any other muscle.  It can be inflamed and scarred. You want to stay away from the elevated disease risk factors associated with extreme endurance training. [18:59]

    A more moderate exercise schedule can dramatically increase longevity.  [22:04]   

    Aerobic workouts emphasize fat burning and are energizing and minimally stressful.  Anaerobic workouts emphasize glucose burning and elicit a significant stress response. [29:50]

    If you have a limited amount of time to train, you may want to downscale your goals and focus on events that match your ability to train for them. [35:14]

    Aerobic development is best accomplished by training exclusively at aerobic heart rates for a sustained period of time. [38:29]

    The cutoff point for aerobic training is the maximum aerobic heart rate defined as 180 minus your age, in beats per minute. You want to remain comfortable. [41:22]

    The real magic happens when you can become more efficient at that comfortable heart rate, and you can realize that your training’s working. Regression in MAF test results suggests you are overtraining. [44:10]

     

    LINKS:


    Brad Kearns.com
    Brad’s Shopping page
    PrimalEndrance.fit
    Primal Endurance
    Mark’s Daily Apple
    A Case Against Cardio
    One Running Shoe in the Grave
    Running on Empty
    Run for Your Life, But Not too Far, and at a Slow Pace
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 51 min
    Simon Whitfield And Andrew MacNaughton: Reflections On An Evolved Approach To Training

    Simon Whitfield And Andrew MacNaughton: Reflections On An Evolved Approach To Training

    I am outnumbered 2-to-1 by Canadians in this episode as Olympic gold and silver medalist Simon Whitfield joins me and my co-host Andrew MacNaughton for a conversation about pursuing goals, changing our mindset towards success, and training.

    In this episode, Simon talks about the most important things he has learned from his long career at the top of the sport, sharing some of the most unique memories and important perspective shifts he has experienced, like his incredible victory in the inaugural Olympic triathlon in Sydney, Australia in 2000. Simon is such a thoughtful and introspective guest to listen to, and he offers many sharp insights that are applicable to both peak performance goals as well as life goals in general. Simon’s way of thinking is: “If you love your pursuits, you’ll find a way to success. If you succumb to your fears and insecurities, your results will suffer accordingly.” You’ll enjoy hearing Simon’s refreshing honesty in this show as he delves into the problems that come with drifting into a prima donna perspective, the importance of recalibrating to focus on the journey, and what changes when you have a strong and authentic support team. “Hard truths come with sharp edges, but they are the source of the greatest learning,” Simon says. He also talks about some fun, recent life events, like his epic standup paddling adventures in Victoria.

    Enjoy this revealing and impactful episode with triathlon’s most thoughtful coach, Andrew MacNaughton, and most thoughtful elite athlete, Simon Whitfield.

     

    TIMESTAMPS:

    Simon Whitfield had an amazing gold medal showing at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney Australia. [00:27]

    Triathlon is high intensity macho contest which takes a certain mindset. [03:12]

    Amazingly, after Simon crashed during the bike ride in the Olympics, her remained calm. He talks about his thoughts at that time. [09:22]

    When Simon was adjacent to the leader, Vokovich, and Vukovich pulled ahead, Simon’s body language changed. [15:36]

    People need to celebrate what they get, not what they didn’t get. [19:58]

    How did Simon’s life change after he won the Olympic gold? He does mentor some younger athletes and spent time reconnecting with family. [21:20]

    After spending time away from the sport is feels good to reconnect with the young newcomers to the sport and remember how it was for you loving and training for your career. [26:31]

    Sometimes it is important for someone to tell you the hard truth. [31:05]

    Team and training partners are very important in so many ways. It is easy to self-sabotage. [33:53]

    The playfulness and bantering with other athletes help to keep you level headed. [37:45]

    Simon is coached by his 80-year-old self. Paddleboarding in the ocean is his best pastime. [41:17]

    An athlete has to understand the math to be aware of where they are as well as the competitors. [50:48]

     

    LINKS:


    Brad Kearns.com
    Brad’s Shopping page
    YouTube 2000 Sydney Olympics Triathlon
    Primal Endurance
    The Art of Learning
    Mark’s Daily Apple
    PrimalEndrance.fit
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 56 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
128 Ratings

128 Ratings

X1JDV ,

Loved Dr Cucuzzella interview!

Always love your podcast Brad, and especially enjoyed learning about Dr C and all the amazing things he is doing at his hospital. My husband and I both work in a hospital and can’t imagine what it would take for this MUCH NEEDED change to happen. Awesome guy and awesome interview

tjhuewe ,

Inappropriate Michael Phelps comment

Your information is very good but the shoehorn comment on Michael Phelps having DUIs to dismiss his contribution to the sport world was unnecessary and in bad faith . This is coming from a person who uses multi sport as a tool to recover from addictions in my life during a time when I thought I had nothing to live for. I couldn’t feel anything and dark surrounded me on all sides until I discovered running. To think that any one person is beyond making human mistakes is inappropriate especially pertaining to those performing at such a high level. I hope we can all have more compassion and understanding for each others journey into whatever form of movement we find peace in.

J. Barshop ,

Awesome show, highly recommend!

Brad and his expert guests provide some incredibly compelling content that’s geared to help you take actionable steps to reach a new level of sustained performance.

Highly recommend listening and subscribing to The Primal Endurance Podcast if you want the knowledge AND mindsets to level up both mentally and physically (and reach your overall athletic goals as a result)!

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