11 avsnitt

For the first time in history, all of humanity is interconnected. Imagine the impact of that.
This is a podcast for social geeks in the prime of life who watch the news with a gnawing feeling of emptiness. It is one mind’s attempt to find answers to the most ridiculously big questions: Who are we? Where do we come from? Where are we going?
Pretentious? You bet.

Mind the Shift Anders Bolling

    • Samhälle och kultur
    • 5.0, 6 betyg

For the first time in history, all of humanity is interconnected. Imagine the impact of that.
This is a podcast for social geeks in the prime of life who watch the news with a gnawing feeling of emptiness. It is one mind’s attempt to find answers to the most ridiculously big questions: Who are we? Where do we come from? Where are we going?
Pretentious? You bet.

    11. Ask the whole world the whole time and you know what’s going on – Bi Puranen

    11. Ask the whole world the whole time and you know what’s going on – Bi Puranen

    Hear the experienced and highly respected ”global trend guru” Bi Puranen explain some of the social mega-trends that we are seeing today.

    On the Pandemic:

    ”Lockdowns have caused a lot more harm than the virus to low and middle income countries . One estimated result is 15 million unwanted pregnancies.”

    ”It’s a huge backlash for the fight against poverty. We have lost ten years.”

    On Democracy:

    ”What do we mean by the term? It can be filled with many peculiar things that someone brought up in the West would never consider democratic.”

    ”We need to learn how to detect the ’submarines’ in popular opinions.”

    On migrants:

    ”We must revise the notion that you never change the mindset you get when you are young. Migrants do.”

    On the elderly:

    ”Where elderly people have a high social position, people also think they have too much influence.”

    On defense:

    ”People aren’t as willing to fight for their nation as before. But they are willing to fight to defend values.”

    Puranen is one of the leaders of the World Values Survey and a researcher at the Institute for Future Studies in Stockholm.

    • 1 tim. 17 min
    10. The stable imbalances of nature – Josef Reichholf

    10. The stable imbalances of nature – Josef Reichholf

    The experienced, sharp-minded, productive and – to some – controversial German ecologist Josef Reichholf is a humble Bavarian scientist who realized early on that he couldn’t compromise with his conscience. That entailed breaking with fellow ecologists, who in Reichholf’s mind had become too ideological. He thinks climate change policy for the most part is a big waste of money – not because there is no warming, but because there are a myriad ways the money could be used wiser. Who is then the biggest culprit in the destruction of habitats? Modern agriculture.

    Some quotes:

    ”Nature has always changed. When our bodies reach equilibrium, we are dead. There is no state of nature that is the ’right’ one.”

    ”Since Enlightenment we have separated nature from humankind. This separation is now predominant in the Western culture.”

    ”As a nature scientist I want to stay unbiased by ideology. The green ideology came into conflict with the scientific facts.”

    • 1 tim. 3 min
    9. Learning to handle the lizard brain – Andreas Bergh

    9. Learning to handle the lizard brain – Andreas Bergh

    Shouldn’t an economist count money all the time? ”No”, is the unequivocal answer from Andreas Bergh, associate professor in economics at Lund university in southern Sweden. In this episode you can hear Bergh develop his sharp observations of human behavior in all kinds of contexts. Some samples:

    On globalization:

    ”We are seeing a backlash against the very forceful and rapid increase in globalization in the 80’s and 90’s, and what else is to expect, really?”

    ”But preventing people from communicating across borders, I don’t see that happening, not even if you try hard to stop it.”

    On the negativity bias:

    ”We are not freeing ourselves from the lizard brain but we are learning how to handle it better.”

    On the internet’s impact on polarization:

    ”Your friends, your family and your workmates are even more similar to you than the people you meet online. Yes, there are echo chambers, but they didn’t appear with the internet.”

    On the rise of right-wing populism:

    ”I was shocked when the liberal elites acted as if these opinions had never existed. Many had naïve expectations of the effect of political participation. Democracy is working; that’s why we are seeing a rise of right wing populist parties.”

    ”At the same time the potential for these parties is decreasing because tolerance is increasing in the long run.”

    On inequality:

    ”It is a problem if the biggest decision regarding your economic standard is the timing of your real estate transactions. It’s hard to get rich by working.”

    • 54 min
    8. The power of empowering women – Bernadette Ssebadduka

    8. The power of empowering women – Bernadette Ssebadduka

    In this episode we meet UNFPA doctor Bernadette ”Bernie” Ssebadduka, who dedicates her working hours to fighting harmful cultural practices in poor rural areas in northern Uganda, such as ”courtship rape” and female genital mutilation performed under the radar.

    But Bernie has also seen change sweeping across Uganda. There is hope, she says: ”We have seen the benefits of empowering women. The game changer has been education.”

    Her own journey is a case in point, from growing up in a large family in a small village via the big city to becoming a highly educated, skilled professional.

    • 1 tim. 2 min
    7. Weather extremes may be less extreme than you think – Debby Guha-Sapir

    7. Weather extremes may be less extreme than you think – Debby Guha-Sapir

    ”This is like a bushfire. If there is one spark, this thing will catch fire”, says epidemiologist Debby Guha-Sapir about the fact that authorities stopped measles vaccinations due to covid-19. Debby founded the world’s best and most reliable database on natural disasters, EM-DAT, at the university of Louvain, Belgium. Dry numbers can be more contentious than you think: ”We get a lot of hate mails about the fact that our data doesn’t show that disasters are increasing. Nobody wants good news.”

    • 55 min
    6. It shouldn’t lead only if it bleeds – Ulrik Haagerup

    6. It shouldn’t lead only if it bleeds – Ulrik Haagerup

    ”The most important weapons for terrorists isn’t Kalashnikovs or suicide bombs, it’s journalists. We journalists are part of the problem of trust meltdown in society. Now we have to be part of the solution”, says this Danish former editor in chief, who fled the bleeding headlines and decided to dedicate his time to making journalism constructive. In 2017 he founded Constructive Institute. He is confident things will change: ”There is one force which is even stronger than fear, and that’s hope.”

    • 1 tim. 1 min.

Kundrecensioner

5.0 av 5
6 betyg

6 betyg

Fluffis2222 ,

The swedish smorgasbord of facts and views

Looking to confirm what you already “know”? Maybe this is not your podcast. If you however wish to expand your beliefs and questions, this is the right place to be. Very interesting guests and I also appreciate the professionalism of Anders. Journalism at its best, far from click baits and always choosing the same perspective. The future looks bright!

Mest populära podcaster inom Samhälle och kultur