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Nathan Wrigley and David Waumsley discuss what it is that they like about WordPress, from plugins to people, themes to hosting!

WP Builds Nathan Wrigley

    • Teknologi

Nathan Wrigley and David Waumsley discuss what it is that they like about WordPress, from plugins to people, themes to hosting!

    WP Builds Newsletter #101 – WordPress 5.4 beta 1, WordCamp Asia cancelled and many phones kills Google maps

    WP Builds Newsletter #101 – WordPress 5.4 beta 1, WordCamp Asia cancelled and many phones kills Google maps

    This weeks WordPress news – Covering The Week Commencing 10th February 2020:



    WordPress Core



    WordPress 5.4 Beta 1 Ready for Testing and Feedback



    Community



    WordCamp Asia 2020 is cancelledandSending love to WordCamp AsiaandWordcamp Asia Cancellation Fee Assistance Package from Wordfence (other partners joining)



    Better Together: WP Engine and Flywheel Make Local and Genesis Products Available to All Customers



    Plugins / Themes / Blocks



    Fluent Forms Update: Post Creation, Chained Select, Trello and more



    Convert Classic Content to Blocks With the Bulk Block Converter Plugin



    EditorsKit Tackles Typography With First Premium Add-On



    BlogVault – We’ve got a makeover!



    StockPack – free images in your media library



    Deals from this week



    Get the WP Builds Deals emails delivered to your inbox!



    WP Data Tables Lifetime Deal – $49



    Wishlist Member Lifetime Deal – $49



    28% off Ocean WP with code: OCEANHEART2XVAL2020 – whilst it lasts



    Security



    Improper Access Controls in GDPR Cookie Consent Plugin



    Critical Vulnerability In Profile Builder Plugin Allowed Site Takeover



    WordPress Vulnerability Roundup: February 2020, Part 1



    WP Builds



    166 – The when and who of marketing



    WP Builds LIVE Weekly WordPress News – 10th February 2020



    Jobs



    Nothing this week…



    Not WordPress, but useful anyway…



    ICANN Allows .COM Price Increases, Gets More Money



    This Man Created Traffic Jams on Google Maps Using a Red Wagon Full of Phones



    You can now make sick beats in Microsoft Excel

    • 25 min
    166 – The when and who of marketing

    166 – The when and who of marketing

    Discussion – The when and who of marketing



    We’re approaching the end of our series in which we explore the book “Watertight Marketing” by Bryony Thomas… only one more to go in a couple of weeks! This podcast is one of a sequence and although you don’t really need to listen in order, should you wish to do that, you can find the previous episodes here:



    149 – Marketing funnels don’t exist!151 – Are we leaking clients?153 – Losing clients before you even get them155 – Are we boring?157 – Honey traps for website clients159 – My nephew makes websites too161 – Why don’t you believe in us?162 – Information Overload164 – The how and where of marketing



    So, as the title suggests, we’re looking at when you might be best to use your marketing muscle, as well as who you might be best targeting it at.



    In terms of when, obviously there’s going to better timings to connect with your client, but knowing when exactly that might be is all but impossible. What’s to say that the most important person in the decision making process might be the sort of person who works late into the night, and makes their important decisions then? Perhaps the people who you are trying to reach are on the other side of the world, or have a team that is dotted all over the globe. It all starts to get rather tricky!



    Is there such a thing as lucky timing? Perhaps the messaging that you’ve been putting out was chipping away at your client and the final nail in the coffin which you think of as ‘lucky timing’ was bound to happen due to all of your endeavours, not just the one that you believe got you the sale?



    It seems that in this day and age of mobile devices we really need to have some mechanism (and your WordPress website is a really good one) to connect with people 24/7/365. This might be too much for some, and it certainly is for me, but it might be the right approach for you or your clients if you can carefully manage it.



    What about the who then? I still believe that word of mouth is the best possible way that you can get clients who understand what it is that you do and who really want to work with you. A website client suggests to their friends and colleagues that you might be a good fit for their next WordPress website project. They come to you already having a slight understanding of the kind of things that you can produce, what your rates are and how you work. If the endorsement is glowing, then you might not need to do a great deal of pitching; they might just be looking for a way to get you on board.



    This ‘word of mouth’ approach though is limited in terms of reach and numbers. There’s only so many people who will suggest you and so we need other options too. So here’s some other things that we cover in the podcast:



    use social media and other channels to ask thought provoking questions in your area of expertisestart a debate about something in the industry that your customers are going to be concerned aboutsay something controversial – this might not be your style, but if your company has a strong set of beliefs you might be able to be forthrightride a common theme – provide value in areas that are frequently discussed in your community



    So it’s another interesting chat about leaking clients and how to prevent it and if you’ve any thoughts on the matter, please leave a comment below or head over to the WP Builds Facebook Group and leave a comment in the thread for this podcast there.



    Mentioned in this episode:



    ‘Watertight Marketing‘ book by Bryony Thomas

    • 55 min
    WP Builds Newsletter #100 – Yes 100! I know! Gutenberg 7.4, CSS standards and deals

    WP Builds Newsletter #100 – Yes 100! I know! Gutenberg 7.4, CSS standards and deals

    This weeks WordPress news – Covering The Week Commencing 3rd February 2020:



    WordPress Core



    Gutenberg 7.4 Adds New Color Controls, Link UI, and Block Scaffolding for Developers



    Community



    Contributor Day is for everyone



    Join the Future of WordPress Themes Conversation: Theme Review Team to Hold Biweekly Discussions



    All in One SEO is now part of the Awesome Motive Family



    Let’s chat about CSS standards



    Why testimonials are important



    Local “Lightening”



    Hourly vs. Fixed Project Billing: Which Is Best for Your Income?



    Plugins / Themes / Blocks



    Ahmad Awais Launches Script to Automatically Deploy WordPress Plugin Updates



    Divi Scroll Effects



    Happy 10th Birthday, Genesis!



    Guteblock Joins the Block Collection Plugin Arena With an Initial 12 Custom Blocks



    ACF Blocks Pro



    Deals from this week



    WP Data Tables Lifetime Deal – $49



    Wishlist Member Lifetime Deal – $49



    Security



    Tutor LMS 1.5.3 – Cross-Site Request Forgery



    WordPress Vulnerability News, January 2020



    WP Builds



    Creating your own managed WordPress service, and keeping all the margin with Patrick Gallagher



    Let Piccia Neri review your website’s UI / UX – Next session is on Wednesday 12th February 2020 at 2pm (UK time)



    Live video from last weeks news!



    Jobs



    Nothing for you this week – I feel that this section might not be that useful!



    Not WordPress, but useful anyway…



    SpaceX will now let you book a rocket launch online starting at $1 million



    Apple unifies its app stores by extending the universal purchase option to Mac apps



    Visme update



    Microsoft Teams goes down after Microsoft forgot to renew a certificate

    • 27 min
    165 – Creating your own managed WordPress service, and keeping all the margin with Patrick Gallagher

    165 – Creating your own managed WordPress service, and keeping all the margin with Patrick Gallagher

    Interview – Creating your own managed WordPress service, and keeping all the margin with Patrick Gallagher



    Today on the WP Builds WordPress podcast we have Patrick Gallagher from Gridpane, which is a new option for hosting your WordPress website.



    We chat about this past with technology and how he developed a passion for working with WordPress, building hundreds of site over the years. Like all of us, he hunted around, trying to find the best hosting solution for his needs, but in all cases he found that there was something missing. So he decided that he was going to roll his own solution which he could then maintain and control himself, his own WordPress managed hosting company.



    I’ve kind of oversimplified the story somewhat. In 2015 Patrick (and much of the internet) got hit by a Christmas day outage at Linode, a popular choice for offloading your hosting. Patrick was having a nice day with his family and suddenly the ‘site down’ emails began to arrive en-masse. So he had to go into work mode and get in touch with his clients to inform them that their sites were broken and there was no real way that he could fix them right away! A horrible moment, but worse for the fact that it was Christmas. This was the day that he decided to solve this problem once and for all.



    So he started Gridpane with the idea that it would develop over time, and he began speaking about it in some online communities. As luck would have it a chap called Jeff Cleverley picked up upon Patrick’s message and then hit it off and Jeff has become the backbone of Gridpane.



    They’ve been working on the stack since then, trying to perfect it, and we dwell for quite a long time on this…



    This primarily revolves around building an automated platform for deploying your own WordPress install no matter what 3rd party service you’re using as the host.



    Although it’s not true to say that Gridpane’s stack is aimed at developers who know their way around web hosting and how a server ought to be configured, you’ll get the most out of it if your are a competent server admin. They have hundreds of new customers and are more than happy to help them, but the bleeding edge performance is going to be open to those who know what they’re doing.



    The other main feature of Gridpane is the speed with which you can get a WordPress website up and running. If you install WordPress manually, you know that this involves multiples steps – create a database, download WordPress core and get that onto the server, link WordPress to that database. This is the famous 5 minute install, and once you’ve done it a few times it’s really easy to do. However, even that can be a pain, and so managed WordPress hosts make that much easier – you will out a few fields, click some buttons and they create everything for you and email you a handful of minutes later to say that it’s all up and running.



    Gridpane go a few steps even further, making it even more efficient. So it’s things like removing the need to create a username and password for your WordPress install, instead they just use the one that you use for logging into Gridpane itself. Less to write down, less to remember, less time to create the website!



    They try to make as many assumptions as they can about how you’re going to want to set up your WordPress website, so that you don’t have to jump through that hoop each time you create an installation.



    So it’s little steps like predefining bundles which tell Gridpane that you want your install to include this SEO plugin, this theme and the DNS ought to be set up in a certain way. All you need to do is name the site, say on which server you want it to reside and hit ‘go’. That’s it, you’re done.



    So, time saved. But what about all the other things that you’d hope for… Security – check, backups – check,

    • 57 min
    WP Builds Newsletter #99 – Lazy Load images in Core, plugin news and deals too

    WP Builds Newsletter #99 – Lazy Load images in Core, plugin news and deals too

    This weeks WordPress news – Covering The Week Commencing 27th January 2020:



    WordPress Core



    Native Lazy Loading Support Coming to WordPress



    Community



    Call for Volunteers – WCEU



    Jan Koch joins WP FeedBack



    5 Coding Bootcamps for Developers to Consider



    Plugins / Themes / Blocks



    Swift Control Replaces WordPress Toolbar With Custom Access Panel



    Toolset mobile editing tools – Toolset Blocks 1.1



    WooCommerce 3.9 Has LandedandIt’s Time for WooCommerce 4.0 Beta Testing



    Introducing a new look for The Events Calendar



    14 New Premium Landing Pages in Brizy Free & PRO



    10up Releases Autoshare for Twitter WordPress Plugin



    Deals from this week



    WP Data Tables Lifetime Deal – $49



    Wishlist Member Lifetime Deal – $49



    Security



    Critical CSRF to RCE Vulnerability in WordPress Code Snippets Plugin



    Back to Basics – Updating WordPress Strategies



    WordPress Vulnerability Roundup: January 2020, Part 2



    WP Builds



    164 – The how and where of marketing



    WP Builds Newsletter #98 – Gutenberg updates / compatible themes and new page builder – including the LIVE News at the bottom of the page



    Jobs



    Nothing this week…



    Not WordPress, but useful anyway…



    All users can now access Facebook’s tool for controlling which apps and sites can share data for ad-targeting



    UX – An infographic rethinking Batman’s classic outfit in a user-centric way



    Meet the super humans

    • 26 min
    164 – The how and where of marketing

    164 – The how and where of marketing

    Discussion – The how and where of marketing



    So… again we reach into the book “Watertight Marketing” by Bryony Thomas for the topic of our discussion this week. It’s one of a sequence and although you don’t really need to listen in order, should you wish to do that, you can find the previous episodes here:



    149 – Marketing funnels don’t exist!151 – Are we leaking clients?153 – Losing clients before you even get them155 – Are we boring?157 – Honey traps for website clients159 – My nephew makes websites too161 – Why don’t you believe in us?162 – Information Overload



    This podcast episode is out attempt to dissect the tricky subject of what your actual messaging might look like; what format it might take as well as where it might go.



    At the start of the discussion I talk about the multiple ways that I push content out concerning this podcast. I have built all of these ideas up slowly over time and never really thought about whether there’s too much, or if the messages were overlapping and therefore deceasing their impact.



    So every time I schedule a post on WP Builds the following ‘content’ is created automatically:



    The RSS feed is updated so that podcast players can push that content to subscribers devicesAn email is sent to the list – you can sign up here by the wayThe RSS feed is scraped by a SaaS app which then creates a post on the following platforms… The WP Builds Facebook Group, The WP Builds Facebook page, WP Build’s Twitter account, WP Builds Telegram feed, The WP Builds Tumblr feed, as well as some LinkedIn pages tooThe RSS feed is scraped by another SaaS app which turns the text in the post and the podcast audio into a video which them gets posted to the WP Builds YouTube channelIFTTT scrapes the RSS feed and pushes an update to the WP Builds Slack Channel



    That’s just the automated stuff! There’s more because the following, more manual things occur too:



    A SaaS app scrapes the RSS feed and alerts me to log into the platform in which I can create posts for up to a year in advance – I only do 1 reminder at 6 months and a year – these go to Facebook and TwitterI create a post for people who have signed up to receive browser notifications as well as in the WP Builds Facebook Messenger chat



    Honestly, the list could go on, but I’m sure that you get the idea! It’s a lot.



    You see I’m working on the principal that you have to be where your audience is, not where you want them to be. As this podcast speaks to a technical audience, that could be anywhere, so I kind of feel that I need to be everywhere too.



    We all know that with pixels and retargeting, we can be a little more clever about this, but the point is necessary. Where do you put your marketing messages? What format do they take? How do we teach our clients about this new digital age?



    What amazes me is that even though I post my messages all over the place, I’m not even close to saturating the list. There’s so many platforms popping up all of the time. My kids don’t use Facebook or email at all, because “d’uh, nobody uses those”. They are on Snapchat and Instagram. So if I were selling trendy clothes to teenagers, I might (or need) have to have a complete rethink about where I want my messages to land.



    There’s also the point about what should the messages look like? Here’s a list that comes of the top of my head:



    plain text emailrichly formatted emailtweetsvideos – in so many possible formatspush notificationstext messagesthe various ad platforms that you can use (Facebook, Google etc.)letterleaflettelephoninga booth at an eventnetworking meetingsposters in public placesads in print mediaword of mouthpodcastviral marketingetc – you get the idea!



    It’s simply breathtaking the amount of ways that you can message people and get t

    • 56 min

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