561 episodes

Each week, It's Been a Minute features people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with journalists in the know. Join us to make sense of the world through conversation.

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It's Been a Minute It's Been A Minute

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

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Each week, It's Been a Minute features people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with journalists in the know. Join us to make sense of the world through conversation.

If you can't get enough, try It's Been a Minute Plus. Your subscription supports the show and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/itsbeenaminute

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    For author Julissa Arce, 'sounding white' isn't a compliment

    For author Julissa Arce, 'sounding white' isn't a compliment

    Julissa Arce used to think that the secret to fitting in was to "sound white" — to speak English perfectly, with no accent. And for years after her family came to the U.S. from Mexico, she did all the things immigrants are "supposed" to do to assimilate: she went to college, got a job at Goldman Sachs and became an American citizen.

    It wasn't enough. So Arce decided that the solution was to stop trying to fit in, and instead embrace her whole identity. Her ideas come to life in her book, You Sound Like a White Girl: The Case for Rejecting Assimilation.

    In this encore episode from this past March, guest host Elise Hu revisits her conversation with Arce about the book, and what it means to celebrate your own culture and history.

    You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenaMin and email us ibam@npr.org.

    • 21 min
    Judy Greer on 'Reboot' — And Why Are There So Many Reboots, Anyway?

    Judy Greer on 'Reboot' — And Why Are There So Many Reboots, Anyway?

    We talk TV REBOOTS. Guest host Elise Hu chats with Judy Greer about her role in the new Hulu series Reboot; her work as a comedic actress, and the state of television. Then, Elise talks with Daniel Herbert, associate professor of film and TV at the University of Michigan and co-editor of the book Film Reboots, about why so many old shows are being remade now. Plus, a special reboot-themed "Who Said That!" with Rob Pearlstein, co-executive producer and writer of the CBS MacGyver reboot (note: Rob is also Elise's partner) and his sister Joanna Pearlstein, opinion editor at The New York Times.

    • 32 min
    How HBO transformed television

    How HBO transformed television

    HBO gave us some of the most iconic television shows of our time: Sex and the City. The Sopranos. Game of Thrones. But is the era of HBO coming to a close?

    Earlier this year, HBO's parent company, Warner Media, merged with Discovery. By next year, the new Warner Bros. Discovery will combine HBO Max with Discovery Plus into an as-yet unnamed umbrella streaming service. The merger raises questions about what's next for the HBO brand – including whether or not "HBO" will still mean "quality TV" once the dust settles.

    Guest host Elise Hu talks to Charles Pulliam-Moore, who covers TV and film for The Verge, about HBO's legacy, how it paved the way for prestige TV, and what changes at the company could mean for what kind of television we'll see.

    You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at IBAM@npr.org.

    • 17 min
    Who needs the monarchy? Plus, why gray floors and barn doors are everywhere

    Who needs the monarchy? Plus, why gray floors and barn doors are everywhere

    King Charles III doesn't enjoy the same popularity as his mother. In the face of mixed feelings towards the new king, some are asking: Is this the beginning of the end of the British monarchy? Guest host Elise Hu talks to Dr. Shola Mos-Shogbamimu, lawyer, activist and author of This Is Why I Resist about this new era for the British royals, the power they hold and the potential opportunities for the new monarch.

    Then, Elise chats with Atlantic writer Amanda Mull about the HGTV-ification of interior design and what the trend says about the housing market.

    Lastly, Elise plays a fast-food-themed version of Who Said That with Sarah and Kaitlin Leung, sisters and co-authors of the upcoming cookbook, The Woks of Life: Recipes to Know and Love from a Chinese American Family: A Cookbook.

    You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at ibam@npr.org.

    • 33 min
    How Girls' Generation shaped K-pop as we know it

    How Girls' Generation shaped K-pop as we know it

    To celebrate their 15th anniversary, the K-pop group Girls' Generation put out their newest album, 'Forever 1.' Today, we're taking a look back at their career and how they changed the standards for K-pop through music, choreography and beauty. Their impact doesn't stop at that — Girls' Generation's debut song is now being used to change the world, just not in the way they planned. Guest host Elise Hu discusses their legacy with music critic Tamar Herman and Korean film and culture scholar Michelle Cho.

    • 20 min
    Serena's final serve; plus, the Emmys in an era of too much TV

    Serena's final serve; plus, the Emmys in an era of too much TV

    Serena Williams just played her last U.S. Open. In the historic two-plus decades of her tennis career, she's won 23 Grand Slams and four Olympic gold medals — all while becoming a mother, dealing with injuries and health crises and facing more scrutiny and downright bias than her peers. Guest host Elise Hu talks to Alex Abad-Santos, senior correspondent at Vox, about her legacy in sports and beyond.

    Plus, the 74th Annual Emmy Awards are on Monday, Sept. 12. In this era of so much TV, how are nominees rising to the top? And how are the different streaming services standing out in the crowd? Elise talks to TV critics Lorraine Ali of the Los Angeles Times and Roxana Hadadi of Vulture about what to expect. They also play Who Said That.

    You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at ibam@npr.org.

    • 37 min

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