152 episodes

We are four clinical psychologists who love to chat about the best ideas from psychology. In this podcast, we explore the psychological principles we use in our clinical work and bring you ideas from psychology that can help you flourish in your work, parenting, relationships, and health. Thank you for listening to Psychologists Off The Clock!

Psychologists Off The Clock Diana Hill, Debbie Sorensen, Yael Schonbrun & Jill Stoddard

    • Mental Health

We are four clinical psychologists who love to chat about the best ideas from psychology. In this podcast, we explore the psychological principles we use in our clinical work and bring you ideas from psychology that can help you flourish in your work, parenting, relationships, and health. Thank you for listening to Psychologists Off The Clock!

    Intuitive Eating

    Intuitive Eating

    Many of us struggle in our relationship with food and weight. If we are going to have a chance at restructuring our relationship with food, it helps to understand the complex interactions at the individual and systemic levels. In this episode, Evelyn Tribole shares her expertise on intuitive eating, a non-diet approach to healing your relationship with your body and food. 



    Listen and Learn:



    * 10 principles of intuitive eating* How diet culture contributes to being disconnected from your body and loss of control over food* Ways to cultivate your inner wisdom around eating* How to rediscover your hunger and fullness cues* Ways to get started on your intuitive eating journey today* How to support intuitive eating in your kids



    About Evelyn Tribole:



    Evelyn Tribole



    Evelyn Tribole, MS, RD is an award-winning registered dietitian, with a nutrition counseling practice in Newport Beach, California. She has written nine books including the bestsellers Healthy Homestyle Cooking and Intuitive Eating (co-author). Her newest book is the Intuitive Eating Workbook: Ten Principles for Nourishing a Healthy Relationship with Food. Evelyn was the nutrition expert for Good Morning America, appearing from 1994-’95 and was a national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association for 6 years. She was a contributing editor for Shape magazine where her monthly column, Recipe Makeovers, appeared for 11 years. She is has appeared on hundreds of interviews, including CNN, Today Show, MSNBC, Fox News, USA Today, Wall St. Journal, and People magazine. 



    Evelyn qualified for the Olympic Trials in the first-ever women’s marathon in 1984. Although she no longer competes, Evelyn runs for fun and is an avid skier and hiker. She also enjoys surfing, kayaking, and white water rafting. Evelyn’s favorite food is chocolate when it can be savored slowly.



    Resources:



    * Intuitiveeating.org* Intuitiveeatingcommunity.org; a free peer-to-peer support group  * Intuitive Eating Training for Health Professionals* @evelyntribole; Instagram* Intuitive Eating, 4th Edition: A Revolutionary Anti-Diet Approach by Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch * The Intuitive Eating Workbook: Ten Principles for Nourishing a Healthy Relationship with Food by Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch* Check out this great article and podcast on Decolonizing Beauty Standards * Check out this article on the impact of weight stigma on health





    Psychologists Off the Clock has had a number of experts on the show sharing their expertise in weight concerns, the neuroscience of eating, eating disorders, and movement. Check them out here! 



    * 67. The Hungry Brain: Outsmarting Instincts That Make Us Overeat With Dr. Stephan Guyenet* 93. Effective Weight Loss with Dr. Evan Forman* a href="https://www.offtheclockpsych.

    • 57 min
    Immigrant and Refugee Mental Health

    Immigrant and Refugee Mental Health

    Over 40 million US residents are foreign-born. Immigrants and refugees face many circumstances impacting their mental health. These include the trauma of the immigration process and the acculturation process that follows. Additionally, many face systemic oppression and the threat of deportation. These challenges are complex and multifaceted. Therefore, therapy and psychology need to do a better job at orienting toward contextual and systemic factors in mental health treatment. 



    Join Diana for this inspiring conversation with Dr. Sandra Mattar, Assistant Professor at the Boston University School of Medicine and leading expert on immigrant and refugee mental health. Dr. Mattar speaks of her experience as an immigrant to the US. Additionally, she talks about the impact of trauma and health disparities in the populations she serves. Dr. Mattar also discusses how to provide compassionate, culturally sensitive treatment to support these members of our community to heal and thrive.



    Immigrant mental health is American mental health. As the Informed Immigrant states: “You deserve to feel safe and empowered, no matter your immigration status.”



    Listen and Learn



    * The individual and systemic challenges impacting immigrant and refugee mental health * How the recent Supreme Court decisions on DACA and refugee asylum impact immigrant and refugee mental health* Ways to shift from an individualistic therapy approach to one prioritizing contextual factors * How mental health treatment with immigrants and refugees is adapting to COVID-19 * Ethnocentric ways to address the ongoing trauma that immigrant communities face* How to practice self-care and self-compassion while taking values-based action as a therapist 



    About Dr. Sandra Mattar



    Dr. Sandra Mattar



    Dr. Sandra Mattar is a clinical psychologist and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Boston University School of Medicine and the Boston Medical Center Boston Center for Refugee Health and Human Rights. Her research and clinical interests include culturally informed trauma treatment, immigrants and refugee mental health, mental health disparities, multicultural psychology, and mindfulness and spirituality. 



    Dr. Mattar is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Psychological Trauma and a member of the American Psychological Association (APA) Race and Ethnicity Guidelines Task Force. Dr. She was also a founding member of the Division 56 (Trauma Psychology) of the APA and a Past Chair of the Committee on Ethnic Minority Affairs of APA. Dr. Mattar is a graduate of the William James College (formerly MSPP) and the Universidad Católica Andres Bello in Venezuela. An immigrant herself, Dr. Mattar was born and raised in Venezuela.  



    Resources



    * Connect with Sandra Mattar:* Twitter: @Sandramattar23* Website at Boston University School of Medicine* APA Guidelines on Race and Ethnicity in Psychology* Immigrant Mental Health Resources from the Informed Immigrant* COVID-19 and U.S.-based refugee populations by Sandra Mattar and Linda Piwowarczyk in June’s issue of Psychological Trauma* a href="https://www.amazon.com/Undocumented-America-Karla-Cornejo-Villavicen...

    • 1 hr 2 min
    How Not Lose It with Your Kids

    How Not Lose It with Your Kids

    Summer is here, which for parents means Season Two of pandemic parenting. Parent tempers are triggered in so many ways now and we’ve lost access to the time and space that we need to calm our buttons. If you’re a parent and losing your cool more than you’d like with your kids, join Yael for an engaging and refreshingly irreverent interview with Dr. Carla Naumberg, author of How to Stop Losing Your Sh*t With Your Kids: A Practical Guide to Becoming a Calmer, Happier Parent. Spoiler alert: This episode’s chock-full of advice for how to make temper buttons less pushable and practical skills for what to do when you’re ready to explode at your kids!



    Listen and Learn:



    * Carla’s 5 basic truths about losing it with our kids * Owning our triggers* Why kids are button pushers and not triggers * Specific practices to “calm” our buttons* Why self-compassion is key, especially now, and how to engage it* Best practices to apply after losing it with your kids/after the sh*t storm



    About Dr. Carla Naumburg:



    Dr. Carla Naumburg



    Carla Naumburg, Ph.D., is a writer, mother, and clinical social worker. She is the author of three parenting books: the bestselling How to Stop Losing Your Sh*t With Your Kids (Workman, 2019), Ready, Set, Breathe: Practicing Mindfulness with Your Children for Fewer Meltdowns and a More Peaceful Family (New Harbinger, 2015), and Parenting in the Present Moment: How to Stay Focused on What Really Matters (Parallax, 2014). Carla has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Huffington Post, CNN, and Mindful Magazine, among other places. Carla lives outside of Boston with her husband, daughters, and two totally insane cats.



    Resources:



    * How to Stop Losing Your Sh*t With Your Kids: A Practical Guide to Becoming a Calmer, Happier Parent by Carla Naumburg* Ready, Set, Breathe: Practicing Mindfulness with Your Children for Fewer Meltdowns and a More Peaceful Family by Carla Naumburg* Parenting in the Present Moment: How to Stay Focused on What Really Matters by Carla Naumburg* Self-Compassion for Parents: Nurture Your Child By Caring for Yourself by Susan Pollack 





    * 113. Self-Compassion for Parents with Dr. Susan Pollak* 123. Tantrum Survival Guide with Dr. Schrag Hershberg  

    • 57 min
    Solitary Confinement and Criminal Justice Reform

    Solitary Confinement and Criminal Justice Reform

    Criminal Justice Reform is an important, and often overlooked element of Racial Justice. In the U.S., Black men are significantly more likely to be incarcerated. Individuals in the criminal justice system are likely to experience inhumane and dehumanizing practices, including solitary confinement. Severe social isolation can have a harmful long-term impact on physical and mental health. 



    In this eye-opening episode, Debbie speaks with Taylor Pendergrass, an ACLU lawyer dedicated to criminal justice reform and co-editor of Six by Ten: Stories from Solitary. The book includes a collection of the rarely heard personal stories of people who have experienced long-term solitary confinement. In the episode, Taylor and Debbie discuss mental health, incarceration, and why we need to end the dehumanizing practice of long-term solitary confinement in the United States. 



    Listen and Learn:



    * Why solitary confinement is used in the U.S, and why long-term solitary confinement is a problem.* About “SHU syndrome,” and the long-lasting psychological and physical effects of isolation on humans. * Why mental health units are a more effective, humane alternative.* What conditions are like in solitary confinement cells. * What we can learn from European prison systems.* How you can help promote criminal justice reform! 



    About Taylor Pendergrass



    Taylor Pendergrass



    Taylor Pendergrass is a lawyer and activist who works on criminal justice reform for the ACLU. He has spent over a decade collecting stories of people who have been impacted by the criminal justice system. Along with Mateo Hoke, Taylor co-edited the book Six by Ten: Stories from Solitary which, through personal history narratives gives readers a better understanding of the horribly dehumanizing impact of solitary confinement on people’s lives. Taylor has a BA in Environmental Policy from Duke University and earned his law degree from the University of Colorado Law School. 



    Resources



    * Six by Ten: Stories from Solitary by Taylor Pendergrass and Mateo Hoke* Debbie's unabridged interview of Taylor Pendergrass on The New Books Network* 13th, a documentary directed by Ava DuVernay on Netflix* The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander * “I Begged Them to Let Me Die”: How Federal Prisons Became Coronavirus Deathtraps by Keri Blakinger and Keegan Hamilton, The Marshall Project, June 18, 2020 * “Coronavirus Cases Rise Sharply in Prisons Even as They Plateau Nationwide” by Timothy Williams, Libby Seline and Rebecca Griesbach, New York Times, June 16, 2020 * ‘People are Sick All Around Me’: Inside the Coronavirus Catastrophe in California Prisons by Sam Levin, The Guardian, May 20, 2020 * NY Times articles (here and a href="https://www.nytimes.

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Extending Compassion

    Extending Compassion

    Many of us are struggling during this time of COVID-19 and police brutality. It can feel hard to extend compassion to those with different views, let alone to ourselves. In this episode, psychologist and creator of Superhero Therapy, Dr. Janina Scarlet, shares her origin story that led from exposure to Chernobyl radiation as a child to immigration to bullying to discovering her calling: helping people with emotional pain become the heroes of their personal journeys. A major element of her Superhero Therapy is practicing compassion.



    Remembering to apply these useful skills can be a challenge. That’s where the founder of the non-profit Compassion It., Sara Schairer, comes in. Sara shares her inspiring story of how she created a worldwide social movement to teach and spread compassion. Janina and Sara talk with us about extending compassion even to those with whom we disagree, and why this matters, especially right now. And Sara leads us in an experiential compassion practice. 



    Listen and Learn



    * What Superhero Therapy is* What Compassion it.tm is and how we can join the compassion mission* How we define compassion* Why compassion toward others, including those with whom we disagree, is important* A helpful compassion exercise



    About Dr. Janina Scarlet



    Dr. Janina Scarlet



    Dr. Janina Scarlet is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, a scientist, and a full-time geek. A Ukrainian-born refugee, she survived Chernobyl radiation and persecution. She immigrated to the United States at the age of 12 with her family and later, inspired by the X-Men, developed Superhero Therapy to help patients with anxiety, depression, and PTSD. Dr. Scarlet was awarded the Eleanor Roosevelt Human Rights award from the United Nations Association for Superhero Therapy. She is the author of “Superhero Therapy,” “Therapy Quest,” “Harry Potter Therapy,” “Dark Agents” Superwomen,” and “Supernatural Therapy”. 



    About Sara Schairer



    Sara Schairer is the founder and executive director of Compassion It®, a nonprofit organization and global social movement whose mission is to inspire daily compassionate actions and attitudes. 



    Sara Schairer



    A facilitator of the Compassion Cultivation Training® (CCT) course developed at Stanford University, Sara has led trainings for audiences of all walks of life, from corporate executives to inmates at a maximum-security prison. She also led compassion trainings in Africa sponsored by the Botswana Ministries of Health and Education and spent a week at a Rwandan refugee camp working on unleashing compassion within its health care system.



    Sara is a contributing author to the book The Neuroscience of Learning and Development: Enhancing Creativity, Compassion, Critical Thinking and Peace in Education, and writes for Deepak Chopra’s Center for Wellbeing website.



    Sara gives talks and leads experiential workshops on burnout prevention, implicit bias, mindfulness, and compassion. She also created the one-of-a-kind reversible Compassion It wristband that prompts compassionate actions on six continents, 50+ countries and all 50 states.



    Resources



    * The Center for Stress & Anxiety Management* Superhero Therapy* Compassion It* Be An Advocate* a href="https://compassionit.

    • 1 hr 5 min
    Parental Burnout

    Parental Burnout

    Burnout. It can happen at work, and it can happen to parents, too. Nowadays, with the COVID-19 pandemic, parents are especially stressed. They are navigating new roles and demands while trying to parent, teach their kids, and provide for their families. All of this with no childcare breaks. It’s the perfect storm for Parental Burnout.



    In this episode, Dr. Lisa Coyne, a parenting and child expert at McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School, speaks with Debbie about signs of parental burnout. She offers practical strategies to help. Dr. Coyne gives suggestions for talking with children and teenagers about the emotional aspects of coping with the pandemic. She provides us an exercise to help reconnect with their big-picture parenting values. 



    Listen and Learn



    * What is parental burnout?* Who’s at risk?* Why pandemic parenting may lead to parental burnout* Simple practices to shift fed-up mood states and increase self-compassion* The power of treating kids as if they’re about to do the next right thing* Strategies to support emotional growth in kids of all ages  * The crucial first response when parenting frustrating kids* Putting “values and vulnerabilities” conversations to work for you* A helpful values exercise for overtaxed parents



    About Lisa Coyne Ph.D.



    Dr. Lisa Coyne



    Lisa W. Coyne, Ph.D., is a licensed clinical psychologist, assistant professor in the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and founder of the McLean OCD Institute for Children and Adolescents (OCDI Jr.). She also founded and directs the New England Center for OCD and Anxiety and is a peer-reviewed Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) Trainer.



    Dr. Coyne has authored or co-authored several books on parenting, children and families including The Joy of Parenting: An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Guide to Effective Parenting in the Early Years; Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: The Clinician’s Guide for Supporting Parents; Stuff That’s Loud: A Teen’s Guide to Unspiraling when OCD Gets Noisyand Stop Avoiding Stuff: 25 Microskills to Face Your Fears and Do It Anyway. She is the incoming president of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS) and earned her BA in Psychology from the University of Scranton and her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Mississippi. 



    Resources



    * PRAXIS: An ACT Approach to Parental Burnout Webinar with Dr Lisa Coyne and Evelyn Gould* Use the Psychologists Off the Clock Discount Code for Dr. Coyne's Praxis live webinars!* PRAXIS: Register for Lisa’s ACT with Parents Webinar (September 28-November 16, 2020). * PRAXIS: Register for Lisa’s OCD Webinar, Stuff That’s Loud. * “Dr. Lisa Coyne Offers Support for Kid and Teens During the Pandemic” McLean Hospital Webinar* “Dr. Lisa Coyne Offers Tips to Help Parents Prevent Burnout” McLean Hospital Webinar* “Dr. Lisa Coyne Shares Coping Strategies for Families During COVID-19” McLean Hospital Webinar* “What Happened to American Childhood?” The Atlantic April 17, 2020 Article by Kate Julian* a href="https://amzn.

    • 1 hr

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