13 episodes

The Oxford Martin Programme on the Illegal Wildlife Trade aims to provide an international hub for interdisciplinary research on the illegal wildlife trade, and foster strong partnerships across sectors, particularly through its Wildlife Trade Symposia. Evolving Perspectives on the Demand for Illegal Wildlife Products is our first symposium to be held in Oxford, on the 25th-27th September 2017.

The illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade is a major and growing threat to biodiversity, contributing to severe population declines. Annually, hundreds of millions of plants and animals are traded and derived into numerous products, consumed for different motivations and values, such as medicinal, food, gifting and cultural. The symposium will share approaches to better understand and address this challenge, present case studies to highlight the complexities of this work and how the consumer demand side of the trade links to the supply side of the trade, and offer opportunities to discuss practical and pragmatic possibilities to move forward.

This three-day event will be an opportunity for people with a common interest, but from different disciplines, backgrounds and institutions to connect with one another, facilitating knowledge exchange, raising awareness of potential synergies and collaborations, and catalyse new initiatives and partnerships.

Our symposium is aimed at providing a much-needed opportunity for people to work together more effectively within the wildlife trade field, helping to build a cohesive network of individuals and organisations and to bridge the gap between academia and practice.

Wildlife Trade Symposium: Evolving Perspectives on the demand for illegal wildlife products Oxford University

    • Education

The Oxford Martin Programme on the Illegal Wildlife Trade aims to provide an international hub for interdisciplinary research on the illegal wildlife trade, and foster strong partnerships across sectors, particularly through its Wildlife Trade Symposia. Evolving Perspectives on the Demand for Illegal Wildlife Products is our first symposium to be held in Oxford, on the 25th-27th September 2017.

The illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade is a major and growing threat to biodiversity, contributing to severe population declines. Annually, hundreds of millions of plants and animals are traded and derived into numerous products, consumed for different motivations and values, such as medicinal, food, gifting and cultural. The symposium will share approaches to better understand and address this challenge, present case studies to highlight the complexities of this work and how the consumer demand side of the trade links to the supply side of the trade, and offer opportunities to discuss practical and pragmatic possibilities to move forward.

This three-day event will be an opportunity for people with a common interest, but from different disciplines, backgrounds and institutions to connect with one another, facilitating knowledge exchange, raising awareness of potential synergies and collaborations, and catalyse new initiatives and partnerships.

Our symposium is aimed at providing a much-needed opportunity for people to work together more effectively within the wildlife trade field, helping to build a cohesive network of individuals and organisations and to bridge the gap between academia and practice.

    • video
    Welcome and opening remarks and Introduction to Open Space

    Welcome and opening remarks and Introduction to Open Space

    E.J. Milner-Gulland, Co-Director of Oxford Martin Programme on the Illegal Wildlife Trade welcomes delegates to the programme's first symposium, co-hosted by San Diego Zoo Global and TRAFFIC. Introduction to Open Space: Jenny Glikman

    Open Space is a convening facilitation process to create dialogue and bring together people with common interests, questions, ideas etc. Throughout the symposium, there will be 3 different areas designated for Open Space, each based on a different component or theme from the first day. Jenny Glikman introduces this technique and explains to delegates how to participate, to make the most out of this opportunity.

    • 6 min
    • video
    Theme 1: Diverse approaches to illegal wildlife trade research: Kelly Malsch

    Theme 1: Diverse approaches to illegal wildlife trade research: Kelly Malsch

    Kelly Malsch, Head of Species Programme at UNEP-WCMC introduces herself as the moderator for the first theme of the day, Diverse approaches to illegal wildlife trade research, as well as the speakers who will present.

    • 3 min
    • video
    Catalysing social and behavior change: Steven Broad

    Catalysing social and behavior change: Steven Broad

    Steven Broad Executive Director, TRAFFIC, gives a talk for the symposium on creating and catalysing social and behavioural change. In recent years, there has been increasing recognition of the value of applying behavioural science for conservation goals. Approaches from fields such as social marketing, Social and Behavioural Change Communications (SBCC) and behavioural economics, are now being considered alongside those from private sector media, marketing and advertising, as valid tactics to employ, in tackling markets for illegal wildlife products, or promoting responsible consumption and markets for sustainably traded products. This talk will explore some of the evidence, experience and examples relevant to this, as well as success factors, lessons learned and insights arising. It will also introduce some of the Tools, reference materials and interactive ‘services’ available to members of the SBCC ‘Community of Practice’ convened by TRAFFIC, which includes 200+ of those with a stake, passion, interest or mandate in influencing wildlife product purchasing preferences and buyer behaviour. Aspects of the talk will also introduce topics that form a focus for the ‘Expert Roundtable on Impact Measurement’, and ‘Changing Business Sector Behaviour workshop’, in subsequent days of the Symposium.

    NOTE: Steve Broad is standing in for Gayle Burgess, who was the advertised speaker, as she is no longer able to attend due to extenuating circumstances.

    • 18 min
    • video
    Exploring cultural values and preferences

    Exploring cultural values and preferences

    Elizabeth Davies gives a talk for the symposium exploring cultural values and preferences surrounding the illegal wildlife trade. Qualitative anthropological methods enable open-ended exploration of cultural values and preferences of wildlife products. Ranging from guided walks to key informant in-depth interviews and participant observation, qualitative methods compliment standardised and quantitative approaches to better understand complex human motivations and preferences for multiple actors. These approaches can help the researcher understand how traditions and values drive decisions to use different animal products for various medicinal, status, in-group membership or other reasons, which may not become apparent or fully understood through standardised quantitative approaches alone. Some key things to consider when planning and developing a qualitative research approach include: In what places and through which methods could you talk to illegal wildlife users or sellers? Who are the key influencers to talk to in this trade? Who should ask the research questions? How can you elicit and gage honesty of responses about people’s opinions and behaviours? Examples are provided from the bushmeat trade in Central Africa and the bear bile trade in Southeast Asia.

    NOTE: Elizabeth Davies is standing in for Shannon Randolph, who was the advertised speaker, as she is no longer able to attend due to extenuating circumstances.

    • 11 min
    • video
    Mapping the emerging online trade

    Mapping the emerging online trade

    Joss Wright, Senior Research Fellow, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, gives a talk for the symposium on mapping the online illegal wildlife trade. The internet’s role as a platform for communication and commerce brings with it the potential for a range of criminal applications. As trade and payment systems have moved online, so have the means to advertise, discover, buy, and sell illicit products. In this talk, we will discuss the extent to which the illegal wildlife trade has emerged online, within the context of general online crime, and the implications of that move. We will examine the range of different platforms used in the online illegal wildlife trade, and discuss techniques for monitoring and analysis of these platforms. Finally, we will consider open questions in assessing the online wildlife trade, and how and where interventions might be most effective.

    • 21 min
    • video
    Theme 1 panel Q and A: Diverse approaches to illegal wildlife trade research

    Theme 1 panel Q and A: Diverse approaches to illegal wildlife trade research

    Panel discussion looking at the first theme's panel. With Kelly Malsch, Head of Species Programme, UNEP WCMC, Steven Broad, Executive Director, TRAFFIC, Elizabeth Davis and Joss Wright, Senior Research Fellow, Oxford Internet Institute, Oxford University.

    • 23 min

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