264 episodes

The Oxford Anthropology Podcast brings together talks by internationally renowned scholars and cutting edge researchers. Their lectures explore a wide range of human experience and feature case studies from around the world.

We are grateful to the speakers and staff and students from the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography who have made this podcast possible.

Anthropology Oxford University

    • Education
    • 3.7 • 72 Ratings

The Oxford Anthropology Podcast brings together talks by internationally renowned scholars and cutting edge researchers. Their lectures explore a wide range of human experience and feature case studies from around the world.

We are grateful to the speakers and staff and students from the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography who have made this podcast possible.

    The Moral Economy of Infrastructures in Everest Tourism

    The Moral Economy of Infrastructures in Everest Tourism

    As social media posts from the slopes of Mount Everest become almost commonplace Dr Jolynna Sinanan (University of Manchester) focuses on digital media use amongst guides and porters and the impact of digital infrastructures in the area. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 45 min
    Pentecostalism, Deliverance and Queer Sexuality in Nigeria: Literary Representations

    Pentecostalism, Deliverance and Queer Sexuality in Nigeria: Literary Representations

    Professor Adriaan van Klinken takes us to the epicentre of Pentecostalism. Through the emerging body of queer Nigerian literature, Professor Adriaan van Klinken (University of Leeds) looks at the motif of the deliverance ritual in a lecture that spans anthropological, gender and sexuality, literary and religious studies.
    Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 46 min
    Stepping in, helping out, competing with…? State and civic actors in Ukraine’s wartime heritage work

    Stepping in, helping out, competing with…? State and civic actors in Ukraine’s wartime heritage work

    Dr. Vonnak reflects on how socio historical events impact the definition, preservation, and sometimes neglect of cultural heritage. She draws from her extensive field work in Ukraine over the past eight years. Edited and hosted by Dora Duo.

    • 47 min
    Parasites, Invention, and Grace: Taking Turns in a Streetcorner Bureaucracy

    Parasites, Invention, and Grace: Taking Turns in a Streetcorner Bureaucracy

    Michael Degani analyzes the styles of work and conflict amongst electrical contractors who congregate across the street from a power utility office in urban Tanzania. Michael Degani (University of Cambridge) explores the balance of entrepreneurial hustle and bureaucratic order their long-running streetcorner bureau strikes.
    Edited and hosted by Peyton Cherry

    This was a departmental seminar at the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography in the 2022-23 academic year. The recordings were only possible thanks to a team dedicated staff and students from The School:
    Executive Producers: Eben Kirksey and Stanley Ulijaszek
    Producer: Jacob
    Evans Sound Design: Seb Antoine
    Sound Recorders: Xinyuan (Connie) Wang and Jacob Evans Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 56 min
    Anthropology, Philosophy and Symmetrisation

    Anthropology, Philosophy and Symmetrisation

    Philippe Descola, one of Anthropology's most influential figures, invites us to go beyond the traditional boundaries of nature and culture and redefine our understanding of humanity's relationship with the world around us. Philippe Descola (Emeritus professor, Collège de France, Paris)
    Edited and hosted by Luise Eder

    This was a departmental seminar at the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography in the 2022-23 academic year. The recordings were only possible thanks to a team dedicated staff and students from The School:
    Executive Producers: Eben Kirksey and Stanley Ulijaszek
    Producer: Jacob
    Evans Sound Design: Seb Antoine
    Sound Recorders: Xinyuan (Connie) Wang and Jacob Evans Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Intimate Rites: Ancestors and Queer Kinship in Zimbabwe

    Intimate Rites: Ancestors and Queer Kinship in Zimbabwe

    Raffaela Taylor-Seymourn examines the engagements with ancestral spirits among young queer Zimbabweans Raffaela Taylor-Seymourn (Pembroke College, University of Oxford) focuses on the form of kinship that young queer people forge with ancestral spirits and how they often contrast to relationships with living family members.
    Edited and hosted by Peyton Cherry

    This was a departmental seminar at the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography in the 2022-23 academic year. The recordings were only possible thanks to a team dedicated staff and students from The School:
    Executive Producers: Eben Kirksey and Stanley Ulijaszek
    Producer: Jacob
    Evans Sound Design: Seb Antoine
    Sound Recorders: Xinyuan (Connie) Wang and Jacob Evans

    • 50 min

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5
72 Ratings

72 Ratings

yodel4321 ,

Dear professor

This was a good lecture the mic was a bit scratchy but I need it for my class in college thanks for touching up on important topics

Crowbar Man ,

Bad lecture, bad audio

Oxford continues a trend. In this case, we have both bad audio (the professor fades in and out as he walks away from the microphone), AND a bad lecture (Lecture 1, 2/10/10). Perhaps I’m biased as a physician and pathologist. It seems that a nutritional anthropologist should inform us of historical nutritional practices, and how they were shown to be beneficial or harmful. Professor Ulijaszek appears to be acting as a nutritionist instead. He literally spent the first half of the show giving advice and opinions on proper nutrition. First I have to say that I’m skeptical that research on nutrition as a PhD gives you the credentials to give nutritional advice. I wish he had reported on the anthropology, given a few opinions as a side note, and left the nutritional advice to a registered dietician or physician. Perhaps more importantly, his arguments were fraught with logical fallacies. Just because the modern “processed food diet” is bad, doesn’t mean that the “paleo diet” is optimal human nutrition. Just because humans evolved with the “paleo diet” doesn’t mean that it was optimal nutrition for modern humans.

01010 shelby thompson ,

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

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