403 episodes

The podcast for adults with ADHD. Hear stories, learn strategies, and get great productivity tips as we talk about the real-life struggles and what it takes to achieve success. Host, Eric Tivers, LCSW, is a psychotherapist, coach and entrepreneur (with ADHD) in private practice. Eric interviews a variety of guests. Many are people just like yourself, as well professionals, entrepreneurs, and ADHD experts.

ADHD reWired Eric Tivers

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.8 • 767 Ratings

The podcast for adults with ADHD. Hear stories, learn strategies, and get great productivity tips as we talk about the real-life struggles and what it takes to achieve success. Host, Eric Tivers, LCSW, is a psychotherapist, coach and entrepreneur (with ADHD) in private practice. Eric interviews a variety of guests. Many are people just like yourself, as well professionals, entrepreneurs, and ADHD experts.

    393 | August Live Q&A with Brendan Mahan, Will Curb, MJ Siemens, coaches Moira Maybin & Roxie Martin, & Barb McDonagh

    393 | August Live Q&A with Brendan Mahan, Will Curb, MJ Siemens, coaches Moira Maybin & Roxie Martin, & Barb McDonagh

    ** There's still room for YOU to join the 26th season of the award-winning ADHD reWired Coaching and Accountability Groups, starting in October!  Head over to to find out how you can be a part of these intensive, online and video-based coaching and accountability groups, so you can get your ADHD rewired and rewrite your ADHD story! [00:02:20]  - Eric has the first ADHD moment of the show  [00:04:38] - Question: A listener who was recently diagnosed with ADHD asks about hyperfocus, prioritizing, and how to tell the difference between something that is a “new” passion versus a hyperfocus, versus a new commitment that may lose interest in.  Learn as much as you can about ADHD. It’s a disorder where information makes a difference.  If you can anticipate the things in your environment that you’re more susceptible to falling into hyperfocus and plan for them. Our tendencies can be double-edged swords.  Ask ourselves: Is it a passion or calling, or something we’re just doing a deep dive on?  Have a place to store your ideas, because it doesn’t mean you have to act on them and continue to scroll. It’s okay to be curious about it, and observe if the curiosity will fade tomorrow before acting on it.  The more we are engaged in thinking about it (our ADHD), the more we are going to take our lives off auto pilot.  Is it a time-suck or a time-investment?  Learning about ADHD is really learning more about ourselves.  [00:14:33] - Question: What is the most frustrating thing about your ADHD? This listener’s most frustrating thing is having to wait for stuff. But first, Barb and Eric have a moment! Roxie:  working memory in almost every aspect of her life, and shares a working-memory moment.  Moira: day-to-day is waiting, but the big-impact ADHD frustration is impulsivity with blurting out.  Will: An extreme lack of executive function while recovering from COVID (at the time of this recording) and activating on the task at hand.  MJ: Impulsivity to never (or rarely) say “no”. Then optimism kicks in, then they realize they can’t do all the things, even though their ADHD wants to do all the things.  Brendan: The “waiting-brain” and having trouble initiating prior to something bigger in the future.  Eric: Transitioning or moving on to the next thing, and multi-tracking and maintenance in multiple domains of life at once.  [00:19:37] - Question: A listener is one month away from having a baby and is in serious need of working on their recently diagnosed ADHD, and wonders how to balance these.  Suggestions: Don’t join a coaching group (yet). Focus on your baby and get to know your baby because the years will fly by.  Learn more about ADHD by listening to podcasts, because you can listen to a podcast and feed a baby at the same time. The more passive the learning, the easier it’s going to be to fit in [the learning] around your baby.  When you’re pregnant, your body has a lot of estrogen which helps your ADHD. When you deliver, those hormones decrease. Women with ADHD have a much higher rate of postpartum depression largely due to this drop.  Figure out what works for you even when others want to give advice, ask for help, don’t be afraid to ask for help, and take care of yourself. [00:30:55] - Question: A listener, who is a startup cofounder, asks about navigating and managing rejection in a practical way, and avoiding participation with the anxiety of facing rejection.  It’s not just about competing with someone else, it’s about competing and challenging ourselves.  Is there risk? Yes. The only guarantee if a “no” is to not do the thing that scares us.  Ask ourselves: Can you do everything that you think you can do and at the same time, understand that it might not go your way, or seal your own fate by not doing anything?  Ask ourselv

    • 1 hr 18 min
    392 | Bi Polar, ADHD, and the Road to Recovery with Jim Long

    392 | Bi Polar, ADHD, and the Road to Recovery with Jim Long

    ** There's still room for YOU to join the 26th season of the award-winning ADHD reWired Coaching and Accountability Groups, starting in October!  Head over to to find out how you can be a part of these intensive, online and video-based coaching and accountability groups, so you can get your ADHD rewired and rewrite your ADHD story! About Jim: Jim has been battling ADHD since his diagnosis at the age of 10 in the early 1980's, adding bipolar type 2 (Bipolar II), substance abuse, and an anxiety disorder to the mix has made life interesting, to say the least! Having a robust recovery plan and a team in place is helping Jim overcome these obstacles and stay on the path to recovery.  Jim is a father of four, married to his wife for 30 years, an army Veteran, and a fire EMS captain.  (Check back for updated timestamps of this episode!) Check out the Other Podcasts on the ADHD reWired Podcast Network: with Brendan Mehan with Will Curb with MJ Siemens with Moira Maybin coming soon - Wait, What Was the Question? with Will Curb and Coach Roxie Martin. Reach out to Will and Roxie at   Don't Forget These, Too! — Support the show by becoming a Patron! — Get your name on the waitlist to join the fall season of ADHD reWired's Coaching and Accountability Groups — Join your ADHD-friendly co-working space! — Join Eric, Brendan, Will, MJ, Moira, Roxie, and Barb for an hour of Live Q&A on Zoom, every 2nd Tuesday of the month at 12:30pm Central (10:30am Pacific / 1:30pm Eastern)

    • 48 min
    391 | Can a Passion For Videogames Help? with Henry Holman

    391 | Can a Passion For Videogames Help? with Henry Holman

    This week, Eric talks with his guest, Henry Holman, about how some of the lessons he's learned through gaming can also apply to real life, the impact of discovering when you're not alone with your ADHD, and dive into a quick coaching session for tips and strategies to managing your to-do's.  About Henry: Henry is going to be a senior at DePaul University, studying computer science and is working towards a career in game programming. Although he was diagnosed at 9 years old, he didn’t start learning about ADHD until he was 19, and remains fascinated with the “why” behind his ADHD-ness. He has loved video games for as long as he can remember, and in recent years, he has learned a lot about himself as he strives to improve at competitive Super Smash Brothers™. His long term career goal is to create a game that makes players feel like they have ADHD, to increase awareness and understanding surrounding the disorder.  This is one of the first episodes in a while where Eric gets to have a guest in-studio!    [00:02:48] - Eric asks how Henry got into video games. It all started with a Game Boy Color™ and a McDonalds toy. Henry and his siblings also split a game console.Then Eric and Henry hash out their virtual tennis accomplishments, and why a lamp-timer is helpful. [00:04:39] - Henry talks about a video game he wants to create that will make people feel like they have ADHD. His brother recommends a game to play, where the underlying theme of the game is a metaphor for overcoming the character’s anxiety, and why it resonated with Henry. He also talks about a game he’s played where the character in the game suffers from psychosis, which also gave him inspiration.    Fun fact: The game Henry mentions in the timestamp above was, indeed, made in collaboration with neuroscientists and mental health professionals. Henry says, “They didn’t want to do [the game] a disservice” and wanted to break a misrepresentation of mental health in games. Read more:   [00:08:31] - Eric asks where Henry is at [with his game]. Henry has already made some prototype levels, designed after , and how the levels represent these deficits.  [00:11:00] - Eric and Henry talk about enthusiasm vs. pursuing a passion professionally. Henry reflects on an episode of ADHD reWired he’s listened to. “We don’t have the luxury [with ADHD] of doing things we don’t like to do for a living” is a phrase that resonates with how he felt about school.  [00:12:44] - Henry really wanted to do game design as a career, but got a “C” in a game-design class, but didn’t quite know what it was he truly wanted to do. Later on, Henry discovers a love for programming, problem-solving, and playing with Lego and K’nex.  [00:15:31] - A moment of ADHD happens right before the break.  [00:22:26] - Henry started educating himself after getting stuck on breaking his skill-ceiling, and talks about the game he dove into to learn how to play competitively. Eric and Henry nerd out about their “mains” in Super Smash Brothers™. Henry explains how picking up a new character in the game was a perfect metaphor for living life with ADHD.  [00:27:13] - “Autopilot” isn’t effective. Henry talks about how his skill-ceiling led to frustration, and coming up with new strategies after losing another set. When he realizes his ADHD may have something to do with his struggles, he talks about diving into ADDitude magazine articles, watching videos on YouTube, and going down the ADHD Reddit rabbit-hole.  [00:30:48] - Henry learns about tournament-nerves, staying calm under pressure, and being able to control impulses, and how in Super Smash Brothers™ was helpful to apply the principles he learned to the real world.  [00:33:20] - Henry recommends taking a drink of water to knock your body out of fight-flight-freeze mode, and how it became his pause-m

    • 1 hr 5 min
    390 | How to Recover from Years of Failure with Aron Croft

    390 | How to Recover from Years of Failure with Aron Croft

    This is an episode you won’t want to miss. Listen in as Eric - and his guest, Aron Croft - talk about the coping mechanisms Aron went through before he was diagnosed, the lessons he learned from his failures, and how he rose like the pheonix from Procrastinator in Chief to developing an ADHD-friendly productivity system you can't not hear about! About Aron: Aron appeared to have it all together when he got into Harvard. But that was the beginning of his demise. He struggled non-stop for 15 years until he was broke, divorced, and earning minimum wage, failing out of his first seven jobs and businesses. But after getting a masters degree in coaching psychology and a diagnosis of inattentive ADHD, his life changed. He built a successful fortune 500 career, got married, and discovered how to get shit done with a neurodivergent brain.  RIght before Eric and Aron hit record, Aron also adds another skill in pillow fort building for reducing slap-back audio in a not-perfectly-acoustic room!  [00:02:26] - Eric and Aron start at the “bottom” of Aron’s story. Aron gets into Harvard and explains how he dropped out twice before graduating, hating school, being outmatched and outclassed. He lost the structure he had around him, moving from south Florida to Boston, and was sick of the pain to get things done by waiting until the last minute until fear motivated him to get things done, studying computer science. Eric affirms that activation energy can be amazing, but comes at a price. [00:05:10] - Aron talks about the ways he got through high school, building relationships with teachers that felt inauthentic, feeling like he needed to be studying subjects that had “right” answers, such as math and science. He goes into how it was easier to bounce back from dropping out of school the first time.  [00:07:11] - Aron shares how he moved his life to an island off the coast of New Zealand, his plan to retire early, and what came out of these decisions he made in his early 20’s, navigating with some minor inconvenient factors he’d overlooked. Even though Aron and his then-fiance quickly discovered boredom, he doesn’t regret his decisions.  [00:10:00] - Eric and Aron agree on the idea of boredom and “retirement”. Then, they discuss the “drug” of self-improvement. Then, Eric asks Aron how they got off the island. [00:11:55] - Aron teaches Eric and the listeners about “The Harvard Curse” and being heavily influenced by his environment.  [00:13:32] - “It’s applying it that’s challenging for me.” - Aron [00:22:16] - Eric asks Aron about the next 15 years. Aron talks about his first job out of school and a decision he wasn’t proud of in that chapter of his life. He then talks about the other jobs he had, but repeated a pattern of letting things pile up until the last minute to get things done. Aron explains how this affected his relationship - navigating without yet being diagnosed with ADHD. After a year and some at his second job, he takes his ambitious 25-year-old-self to start a business in real-estate. Then, queue a slight tangent about their handyman skills! [00:25:41] - Aron shares a realization about being his own boss, moving to Australia, and going into sales. He then discovers a world-renowned program at the University of Sydney in Executive Coaching, seeing a Master’s Program in Coaching Psychology, changing the trajectory of his life for the better. His passion shines here, and tells the story about how a gag-gift from a friend sparked his relationship with personal development.  [00:30:50] - Eric and Aron fast forward to when he moved back from Australia to Chicago and landing a new job. Receiving some feedback and realizing his position is now at risk, Aron shares his story about the measures he took to keep himself employed.  Mentioned here: If you are struggling with addiction, here ar

    • 1 hr 7 min
    389 | Fear, Joy, and Showing up with ADHD reWired Coach - Roxie Martin

    389 | Fear, Joy, and Showing up with ADHD reWired Coach - Roxie Martin

    If you’ve wanted to hear more about ADHD reWired Coach, Roxie Martin, then this is the show you need to listen to. In this episode, Eric and Roxie get vulnerable and  dive into tackling fear, facing joy, and what it means for them to show up.  About Roxie: Roxie Martin is a certified life-coach, currently coaching her second season of ADHD reWired’s Coaching and Accountability Groups. She has 35 years of research experience in what it’s like to be an adult with ADHD, and a lifetime of hard-won wisdom to share. She has a colorful and diverse background that allows her to deeply relate and connect with almost anyone. She has been a ministry leader, a wife, a mom, a hair stylist, and a mentor. She is compassionate, encouraging, and has a finely-tuned b******t-meter that helps cut quickly through the fluff and get right to the good stuff. [00:02:17] - Eric and Roxie go into the timeline of how she became one of the ADHD reWired Coaches. From ArC member to peer mentor, Eric wanted Roxie to become a coach for the groups.    [00:03:57] - Eric asks Roxie if she’s always innately had [her b******t-meter] - her answer feels like an honest yes and explains why it feels weird to say it. They talk about intuition, as Eric feels like grad school beat the intuition out of [them] and learned not to trust the intuition, but has learned to listen to and amplify his intuition through coaching.   [00:05:31] - Eric talks about the vision of how things were “supposed” to go, have a laugh about how things went out-of-order, and how Roxie is coaching her second season and starting up a podcast with Will Curb called, “Wait, What was the Question?”   [00:06:40] - Eric and Roxie dive into who Roxie is, and the vulnerabilities Roxie has been exploring in her own life. Roxie goes more into “counterfeit” vulnerability through her own exploration and self-awareness. She talks about things that hadn’t changed over the years, and what she did when she was put into situations she had to be vulnerable in. Roxie goes more into what her actions used to be and verbalizes the feelings that came up for her when faced with a choice to take the easy or vulnerable way through.    [00:09:16] - Roxie answers Eric’s question about what it is she was numbing from. She talks about where she noticed it [the feelings] came up the most, such as events or parties or being in settings where she’s not comfortable - particularly social things, and where she knew she would have to have a hard conversation.     [00:10:27] - Roxie talks about what got her more curious, with Eric’s impression that she looks through a lens of curiosity. Roxie says she wishes she had a b******t meter for herself but can feel it when she’s justifying, compromising, or playing small. She then talks about why she’s played small. She acknowledges she’s not able to change it, but is not able to ignore it. Hear more here about her beginning when she first joined ArC and talks about being dumb on purpose. She also talks about creating a safe space for the members of her groups.    [00:13:22] - Eric asks what her training has taught her about showing up in group. She says she’s learned a lot more about coaching from being part of the ArC seasons, with her classes still being valuable. She then dives into compassion being great, but you need compassion and strength in order to feel safe and secure. Roxie dives into why the strength-piece is important, talks about the ways we communicate information, and trusting the intuition and gut with the knowledge and strength.   [00:22:41] - Roxie and Eric shine a light on what Roxie has seen in her coaching sessions, what stands out for her, and what she’s learned from the members. She talks about impulse control, the excitement of witnessing growth and self-realized epiphanies, and reframing self-talk, reiterating th

    • 1 hr 9 min
    388 | July Q&A with Brendan Mehan, Will Curb, MJ Siemens, Coach Moira Maybin, Coach Roxie Martin, & Barb

    388 | July Q&A with Brendan Mehan, Will Curb, MJ Siemens, Coach Moira Maybin, Coach Roxie Martin, & Barb

    This week, we have the full panel of the ADHD reWired Podcast Family joining in for this month’s Q&A Session, recorded on July 13th 2021. Find all the good stuff below!   [00:03:56] Maria, a mom and former teacher, asks about subtypes of ADHD. She also asks about structure and looks for tools to strategize while jump-starting a teaching career online and plan better.  Eric explains how ADHD “subtypes” shifted to “presentations” because over time, the presentation of ADHD can change. He also goes in depth about the diagnostic criteria, and the differences between children and adults. Most adults are the “combined” type of ADHD, along with Eric himself. When looking for strategies, he goes on to explain how it’s important to look at the functional impairments. Any kind of diagnosis is a starting point, but isn’t prescriptive. Moira explains how as people age, the more we internalize symptoms, so the hyperactivity may be more in thought rather than physically hyperactive. Women are also more likely to be inattentive, in the inattentive type. As Maria put it: “Meta inattentiveness!”   [00:09:24] Malika asks about menopause and how she’s observed that her symptoms have become much worse since it came on full time.  Moira talks about estrogen, and once someone goes through menopause, the body doesn’t make any more. Estrogen reduces ADHD symptoms, which is why when women are pregnant, they present with fewer ADHD symptoms. And, while women are in perimenopause, the estrogen levels are more erratic than in puberty. She talks about how hormone replacement therapy can be used to replace estrogen, and it also depends on someone’s own health profile and family history,  and hormone replacement therapy may not be for everyone. Another suggestion was increasing medication during that time, and a lot of things around lifestyle become important. Resource mentioned here:    [0:14:31] Sandra asks, “How can I help my 14-year-old son become more organized for high school, and writing notes for his classes to study from for tests?” Brendan asks parents of ADHD kids: What’s going on with the IEP and the 504? What are the supports happening at school to help him get to where he needs to be? Brendan says the best option is to have someone take notes or provide them for him so that he has good notes to study from, whether it’s a teacher or a peer, so he can study notes that are useful. He explains that someone giving a model can help Sandra’s son understand how he should be taking notes so he can do a better job with moving forward. Brendan also explains to be patient as he practices his new [note-taking] skill, and to leverage IEPs, 504s, and talking to teachers, guidance counsellors, special education teachers, etc.  Roxie talks about how she’s had to work really hard to take better notes and that models are helpful. She acknowledges that it’s about incremental changes, because the template or the model doesn’t automatically mean we become amazing at it right away.  Resource mentioned here: Eric mentions a course on how to draw your notes. He also explains that sometimes we don’t know what’s important, so we might take notes on everything, then we try to distill what’s important and what’s not.  Brendan also suggests taking notes in two different colors, and to switch colors when a concept changes.  Will reiterates the sketchnote idea and is great to help create that organization. Will also mentions the Cornell-style of taking notes, then Brendan goes in depth with how they work and how he makes that style work for him. It can be good for [taking notes during] business meetings, too! Moira found how-to books, and suggests that note taking is a life-long skill. As a teacher, she actively tried to teach these tips to her students, not realizing it was because of her own struggle w

    • 1 hr 13 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
767 Ratings

767 Ratings

mdorys ,

Loving this podcast!

This podcast speaks to me in so many ways. The frustration of growing up having to work so much harder than others around me…

v8blues ,

Estrogen adhd connection

What a relief to hear of the estrogen-adhd connection today. While I’ve learned so much from your show, this information might be the biggest surprise but totally makes sense. I haven’t been able to understand until how it is when I think I should be at the top of my game in life as far as knowing myself well and being more mature, that my adhd has seemed worse than ever. Mystery solved! Thank you. Totally recommend your show to friends and family.

Quiteasmile007 ,

Life changing for me 😊

My life has taken on a different trajectory due to listening to ADHD reWired with Eric Tivers. I’ve learned so much about myself and feel a connection to others that I’ve never felt before. I wish I would’ve known about this community much sooner as it has had a beneficial impact on my life. I couldn’t recommend it more!

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