11 episodes

In summer 2016, a police shooting upended the life of Arnaldo Rios Soto, a 26-year-old, non-speaking, autistic man. Aftereffect is Arnaldo’s story – a hidden world of psych wards, physical abuse and chemical restraints – and asks the question: How did Arnaldo’s life go so wrong? Aftereffect by Only Human is produced by WNYC Studios, a listener-supported producer of leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and many others.
© WNYC Studios

Aftereffect WNYC Studios

    • Daily News

In summer 2016, a police shooting upended the life of Arnaldo Rios Soto, a 26-year-old, non-speaking, autistic man. Aftereffect is Arnaldo’s story – a hidden world of psych wards, physical abuse and chemical restraints – and asks the question: How did Arnaldo’s life go so wrong? Aftereffect by Only Human is produced by WNYC Studios, a listener-supported producer of leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and many others.
© WNYC Studios

    Listen to This: 'The Stakes'

    Listen to This: 'The Stakes'

    On The Stakes podcast, host Kai Wright and team bring you more stories about inequality, health and justice... and more. In this episode: implicit bias in medicine brings life or death consequences for black moms and their children. A black woman in America is three to four times more likely to die than a white woman during pregnancy, childbirth, and in the year after the baby's born. As more and more black women share their near death experiences while giving birth, including world tennis champion Serena Williams, we see this reality affecting black woman regardless of education or wealth. So what are black women supposed to do with this information as they think about pregnancy? And can we really eliminate implicit bias?

    WNYC’s health coverage and The Stakes is supported in part by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Jane and Gerald Katcher and the Katcher Family Foundation, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

    • 24 min
    WNYC Studios presents: The Realness

    WNYC Studios presents: The Realness

    The Realness is about how a sick kid became a legendary rapper, but still couldn't escape sickle cell anemia.

    • 4 min
    Episode 8: “They call him Cheese”

    Episode 8: “They call him Cheese”

    One day in February, a group of staff packed up Arnaldo's belongings, moved him out of Carlton Palms and into a three-bedroom house in a suburban neighborhood. On its face, it's the type of setting disability advocates strive toward. Arnaldo has his own bedroom, more autonomy, a staff that looks after him.

    At the moment, Arnaldo is the only resident. He'll eventually share the house with two other men, but just days before the first is slated to join Arnaldo, he dies - under suspicious circumstances in the care of Carlton Palms.

    • 33 min
    Episode 7: “The man behind an empire”

    Episode 7: “The man behind an empire”

    For decades, Carlton Palms' elusive founder, Ken Mazik, has wielded his power and influence to sway members of Congress and state legislatures into bending the rules in his favor -- from scuttling laws that would limit the use of physical restraints, to securing permission from the state of Florida to amass a fortune in Medicaid funding.

    As one of his former employees told us, "Ken Mazik made millions of dollars tying up little kids."

    • 28 min
    Episode 6: “When they don’t behave”

    Episode 6: “When they don’t behave”

    A cup of hot water thrown on a developmentally-disabled resident. Another kicked in the ribs. A tooth knocked out by a staff member. Carlton Palms is known for abuse and even death. So why is the state of Florida so reluctant to close it?

    • 32 min
    Episode 5: “I need to believe”

    Episode 5: “I need to believe”

    A year and a half after the shooting, there are signs of trouble at Arnaldo's new home, Carlton Palms. The staff isn't keeping an eye on him. There are unexplained injuries. His mother isn't allowed to see his room and he's being restrained in a full-body mat for getting out of bed at night.

    And yet, his family continues to hold out hope that this is the right place for him.

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

Angoraknitter ,

A good overview

As a parent of a new adult on the spectrum who has just entered into a group home I appreciate the thorough review of the history and factors surrounding this horrible news story. These events are stuff of a special needs parent’s nightmares. We work our whole lives trying to ensure our loved ones will be safe, cared for, and loved. However, there are legitimate challenges that sometimes make a out of home placement essential. My son wants to live an independent life like everyone else. He doesn’t necessarily want to live at home with mom and dad forever. We want him to thrive and grow. I’m learning as we go here. If there are lessons to be learned from incidents I hope we can grow wiser from them and do better. Now if someone could go find out what happened at the Costco in Corona that resulted in the shooting death of a reportedly non-verbal man with ID, that would be a great follow up to this series.

Lail_Mail ,

Fantastically Done

As a special education teacher and a sibling of an adult with an intellectual disability, the respect shown in this story is fantastic. The reporting shows the family perspective in a truthful and compassionate way while also giving facts about the normal day-to-day experiences that most people with ID or ASD face. Everyone should listen to this, especially if you don’t know much about the lives of those with disabilities. Thank you for making this!

Merdymoore ,

Horrifying

As a mother to an individual with autism, this story terrified me and made me reach out to local police to see what, if any, kind of training police officers are receiving with regard to dealing with people with disabilities. Great story, great reporting.

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