9 episodes

As She Rises is a new podcast from Wonder Media Network. It brings together poems from artists throughout the US and territories that depict the effects of climate change on their home and their people. Each episode carries the listener to a new place through a collection of voices, local recordings and soundscapes. Stories span from the Louisiana Bayou, to the silent tundras of Alaska to the receding coastlines of Puerto Rico. Centering native voices and women of color, As She Rises personalizes the elusive magnitude of climate change.

As She Rises Wonder Media Network

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8 • 83 Ratings

As She Rises is a new podcast from Wonder Media Network. It brings together poems from artists throughout the US and territories that depict the effects of climate change on their home and their people. Each episode carries the listener to a new place through a collection of voices, local recordings and soundscapes. Stories span from the Louisiana Bayou, to the silent tundras of Alaska to the receding coastlines of Puerto Rico. Centering native voices and women of color, As She Rises personalizes the elusive magnitude of climate change.

    The City

    The City

    “The worst crime I know men have committed is to turn nature into an oppressor.”

    In the city, the heat is suffocating: it reverberates off buildings, seeps through the concrete, and bounces off glass back down onto a city of 8.4 million people. New York City is hotter than ever before-- but it’s felt differently from neighborhood to neighborhood. Today, we’re ending our season in the land currently known as New York, where increasing heat exacerbates the risks already felt by communities bearing the brunt of a changing climate.

    Jade Lozada, a college student and climate organizer, recites her poem “The Worst Crime,” commissioned for the Natural Resources Defense Council, and explains the dual role heat plays in bringing her closer to home, and making home uninhabitable. Dr. Melissa Barber, co-founder of South Bronx Unite, studies hyper localized heat islands and protests corporate intervention with community-generated solutions to the climate crisis.

    • 39 min
    The Plains

    The Plains

    In Oklahoma, a fight is playing out that could finally recognize tribal sovereignty, especially over how to manage the environment. This could set a precedent for the rest of the country, and affect our climate. But the powers that be won’t let go easily.

    In this episode we visit the plains of eastern Oklahoma. Joy Harjo, the United States poet laureate, reads her poem “Speaking Tree” and shares what happens when we lose touch with traditions that center care for the earth. Casey Camp-Horinek, a matriarch and drum keeper of the Ponca Nation of Oklahoma, is an environmental activist fighting to free her community from the clutches of the oil and gas industry. She reminds us that we are all bound in responsibility to each other to care for this earth, and that Indigenous voices should be at the forefront of climate discussions and policy change.

    • 30 min
    The Tinderbox

    The Tinderbox

    This land has always been on fire. But the destructive power of these flames is new. There was a time before, and there is a time ahead, when fire clears the way for new growth in the foothills. “So many particular precious, irreplaceable lives that despite ourselves, we're inhaling.”
    In this episode, we visit the land currently known as Northern California. Molly Fisk, inaugural poet laureate of Nevada County, California, recalls the devastation of the Camp Fire and the trepidation that follows rebuilding in the scorched tracks of a wildfire. Margo Robbins, Yurok Tribal member and executive director of the Cultural Fire Management Council, explains the ecosystem’s intricate connection to fire and the role prescribed burns played in this area’s past, present, and future.

    • 29 min
    The Watershed

    The Watershed

    The most visited stretch of beach in Hawai’i should be underwater. Instead, it’s kept afloat by over thirty thousand tons  of sand-- sand that drifts out to sea every 5 to 10 years before it's replaced yet again. Before the Ala Wai canal drained the watershed, Waikiki sustained a native population of over a million, and fed and nurtured its diverse wildlife in a self-sustaining system. Today, king tides are trying to reclaim Waikiki.

    “This is not the end of civilization, but a return to one. Only the water insisting on what it should always have, spreading its liniment over infected wounds. Only the water rising above us, reteaching us wealth, and remembering its name.”

    In this episode, we visit the man-made beach of Waikiki. Poet Brandy Nālani McDougall reads from her collection “The Salt-Wind, Ka Makani Paʻakai” and tells us of Hawai’i before the Ala Wai. Frankie Koethe, community outreach liaison for the Ko’olau Mountains Watershed Partnership, explains the intricacies of the Waikiki watershed and the dangers it faces in an era of urbanization.

    • 31 min
    The Inland Sea

    The Inland Sea

    In Northern Minnesota, over eleven hundred glassy lakes create a vast inland sea. The water is so clean that canoers can drink straight from the lakes. What will it take to protect this beautiful and life-giving landscape from human threat?

    In this episode, we are transported to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness of Minnesota. Kim Blaeser, former Wisconsin Poet Laureate, reads her poem “Eloquence of Earth.” And she speaks about how the threat to this water is a threat to Anishinaabe people. Becky Rom, national chair of the Campaign to Save the Boundary Waters, grew up navigating these waters. Today she’s fighting to protect the landscape she holds dear from sulfide-ore copper mining.

    • 30 min
    The Island

    The Island

    “It’s not the same, knowing the theory of climate disaster, and then actually living through it.”

    There is a fissure on the island of Puerto Rico-- one widened in the wake of massive storms, earthquakes, COVID, and quickened by the dizzying pace of climate change.

    In this episode, bilingual poet Raquel Salas Rivera finds hope in a poem titled “nota para una amiga que desea suicidarse después del huracán” and tells us about the ripples of trauma Maria left behind. Local activist Amira Odeh recalls being unable to recognize her own home after the storm and how she’s working to rebuild PR.

    • 30 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
83 Ratings

83 Ratings

Orb7_rulez ,

End Global Warning EZ

Two Words

Im Not

Sorry for

Breaking rules

Penultimate in

The slinger

It is

A cold

Hard world

Frozen solid

Dry ice

Wicked compression

Horrendously absurd

Silently, defiantly

Onwards Toxicity

Glittering Frosty

Two Words

Greenhouse Gas

Global Warming

Carbon Dioxide

Wicked Compression

Ice Cold

Dry Ice

Solidly Severed

Ice Shelved

Great Pyramids

Of Freeza

Square Cut

Negative 108F

Opps I

Flunked Oppression

And Yell

Leroy Jenkins

LoL WoW!

kingma1 ,

Beautiful and enlightening

This is the best podcasts I have ever listened to. I believe it took 2 years to make these 8 episodes. This hard work shows in the quality and depth of each episode. Climate change is an overwhelming topic to address, but each episode truly illuminates the important real life results of climate change and helps the listener understand how to address this difficult subject.

Roberto221. ,

Honest review.

5 star for this show.

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