25 episodes

Booked on Planning is a podcast that goes deep into the planning books that have helped shape the world of community and regional planning. We dive into the books and interview the authors to glean the most out of the literature important for preparing for AICP certification and just expanding your knowledge base. ​We are all busy with our day to day lives which is why we condense the most important material into short 30 minute episodes for your commute, workout, or while you are cleaning up around the house. Join us while we get Booked on Planning.

Booked on Planning Booked on Planning

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

Booked on Planning is a podcast that goes deep into the planning books that have helped shape the world of community and regional planning. We dive into the books and interview the authors to glean the most out of the literature important for preparing for AICP certification and just expanding your knowledge base. ​We are all busy with our day to day lives which is why we condense the most important material into short 30 minute episodes for your commute, workout, or while you are cleaning up around the house. Join us while we get Booked on Planning.

    A Decent Home

    A Decent Home

    Affordable housing has been around long before the programs of recent history, dating to the 19th century. To adequately provide for it requires a varied approach to serving all income levels, from the most impoverished to moderate-income families. This means both supply and demand side programs paired together, with voucher programs across the board and low-income housing tax credit (LIHTC) projects supplementing the need. According to author Alan Mallach of A Decent Home, housing vouchers or their equivalent should be a universal right for those who need it. The affordable housing crisis and homelessness will not be solved until the government does this. In this episode, we discuss these topics in-depth and go into what changes he would make to the book, which was published over 12 years ago but remains an important topic today.

    • 34 min
    Cities of Tomorrow

    Cities of Tomorrow

    Planning and problems of the city are synonymous, merging into the economics, sociology, and politics of cities which are reflective of their time. In Cities of Tomorrow, author Peter Hall says, “historical actors do perform in response to the world they find themselves in and in particular to the problems that they confront in that world.” This book is focused on the late 19th and 20th centuries, starting with the poor conditions of housing in the Victorian era which gave rise to the field of planning. He also thoroughly covers the Garden City movement, suburban sprawl and regional planning, transportation and highway building, and several design movements, some with ties to Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia. In just over 500 pages of text, the author provides a detailed account of the successes and failures in city planning history so that we may learn and understand that most ideas are not wholly original but are versions of an earlier approach. Check out this episode with guest and fellow Cities of Tomorrow fan Gracen Johnson as we discuss the books key points and observations when reading the text in the context of society today.

    • 43 min
    Missing Middle Housing

    Missing Middle Housing

    Missing middle housing—the cottage court, townhomes and duplexes, and low-rise apartment units, are becoming more essential in city development. Missing middle has shifted from a good to know by planners, city officials, and developers to a need to know. This type of housing unit is becoming increasingly important to single person households and downsizing boomers who want to live in more walkable neighborhoods, an inherent feature of the missing middle neighborhood. By providing a variety of housing options that include these types of units, cities can support economic growth and development. There is also an equity component in this conversation. Where past discriminatory zoning and housing policies have led to income disparities for minority populations, missing middle could help build back generational wealth held from these groups. To keep this home type affordable, technology needs to catch up with the movement. Modular housing can be the future of missing middle housing but is currently lacking in the modular conversation which has only really been tested on large scale apartment projects. To hear more on missing middle housing, check out this episode with author Daniel Parolek on his book Missing Middle Housing: Thinking Big and Building Small to Respond to Today’s Housing Crisis.

    Links:
    Missing Middle Housing Book: https://islandpress.org/books/missing-middle-housingMissing Middle Housing Website: https://missingmiddlehousing.com/ Form-Based Codes Book: https://islandpress.org/books/form-based-codes Prairie Queen Project: https://opticosdesign.com/work/bungalows-on-the-lake-prairie-queen/ AARP Missing Middle Guide: https://www.aarp.org/livable-communities/housing/info-2020/missing-middle-housing.htmlOpticos Design: https://opticosdesign.com/blog/ 

    • 47 min
    Planning for Community Resilience

    Planning for Community Resilience

    One of the main areas for improving our approach to planning for resilience is improving communication between departments and communication between plans. Our hazard mitigation plans should be incorporating action items from climate action plans and our comprehensive plans should be including the hazard mitigation plan information. It’s not enough to just reference the document, but all city plans and priorities need to consider hazards before adoption to avoid situations like goals for a walkable, urban, dense downtown when the downtown is prone to frequent flooding. As author Jaimie Hicks Masterson said planners should look at policies, plans, processes, and procedures within their department to ensure they support reducing hazard risks. Planners should step forward and be the conveners that we are trained to be.
    Links:
    Building Resilience Through Plan Integration article with a link to the Plan Integration for Resilience Scorecard Guidebook: https://www.planning.org/pas/memo/2021/jan/Episode Artwork: Malachi Brooks on Unsplash

    • 38 min
    Pedestrian and Transit Oriented Design

    Pedestrian and Transit Oriented Design

    Pedestrian and Transit Oriented Design is not a book about design but a book about policy and process. Change doesn’t happen all at once, despite our desire, so we must make decisions about priorities and which changes happen in the first wave of upgrades and which will come later. This book helps to set those priorities by laying out three chapters with essential, highly desirable, and worthwhile but not essential design elements. As author Keith Bartholomew put it, all the elements are worth considering, but in a world of incremental change and priority setting, not all of them can be included. As planners, elected or appointed officials, or designers it’s our job to “push the cart that much up the hill and then hopefully someone will come in behind and pick up the work after that.” Meaningful change is small change. Places grow organically and are not all ready to go out of the box like Ikea furniture. Instead, find the situation and challenges of a particular place and strategize to get the best outcome you can for that situation, recognizing that no cookie cutter list will give you the answer. The best way to find answers is to look around your community for areas that are working and find ways to replicate that elsewhere though policies or programs.

    • 45 min
    The High Cost of Free Parking

    The High Cost of Free Parking

    To summarize an 800 page book in three points, cities should charge the right price for curb parking (the lowest price that maintains one to two open spaces), spend the revenue on the neighborhood with upgrades like planting trees, cleaning and upgrading sidewalks, providing transit passes, and remove off-street parking requirements. If we stop to think about the parking situation, we will realize we have been designing cities to accommodate cars for decades, instead of designing cities for the people living in them. As the author Donald Shoup points out however, planners are adept at pivoting to change course in a relatively short time. We have ample resources with all the surface parking lots in our communities to reclaim for housing and other much needed development. We should reconsider what’s the highest and best use of the curb lane, economically speaking, and often the answer is not parking. When approaching parking from an economic position, it is easy to make the argument that free parking is a drain on cities not just financially, but environmentally as well. 

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

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3 Ratings

Female Lawyer ,

Great insight into the Planning world!

I've learned so much from the these conversations!

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