18 episodes

Conversations that help business leaders make sense of new technologies coming out of the lab and into the marketplace. Hosted by Laurel Ruma, from MIT Technology Review Insights.

Business Lab MIT Technology Review Insights

    • Technology
    • 4.4 • 18 Ratings

Conversations that help business leaders make sense of new technologies coming out of the lab and into the marketplace. Hosted by Laurel Ruma, from MIT Technology Review Insights.

    The Fourth Industrial Revolution Has Begun: Now’s The Time to Join

    The Fourth Industrial Revolution Has Begun: Now’s The Time to Join

    2020 has created more than a brave new world. It’s a world of opportunity rapidly pressuring organizations of all sizes to rapidly adopt technology to not just survive, but to thrive. And Andrew Dugan, chief technology officer at Lumen Technologies, sees proof in the company’s own customer base, where “those organizations fared the best throughout covid were the ones that were prepared with their digital transformation.” And that’s been a common story this year. A 2018 McKinsey survey showed that well before the pandemic 92% of company leaders believed “their business model would not remain economically viable through digitization.” This astounding statistic shows the necessity for organizations to start deploying new technologies, not just for the coming year, but for the coming Fourth Industrial Revolution.
    This podcast episode was produced by Insights, the custom content arm of MIT Technology Review. It was not produced by MIT Technology Review’s editorial staff.
    Lumen plans to play a key role in this preparation and execution: “We see the Fourth Industrial Revolution really transforming daily life ... And it's really driven by that availability and ubiquity of those smart devices.” With the rapid evolution of smaller chips and devices, acquiring analyzing, and acting on the data becomes a critical priority for every company. But organizations must be prepared for this increasing onslaught of data.
    As Dugan says, “One of the key things that we see with the Fourth Industrial Revolution is that enterprises are taking advantage of the data that's available out there.” And to do that, companies need to do business in a new way. Specifically, “One is change the way that they address hiring. You need a new skill set, you need data scientists, your world is going to be more driven by software. You’re going to have to take advantage of new technologies.” This mandate means that organizations will also need to prepare their technology systems, and that’s where Lumen helps “build the organizational competencies and provide them the infrastructure, whether that’s network, edge compute, data analytics tools,” continues Dugan. The goal is to use software to gain insights, which will improve business.
    When it comes to next-generation apps and devices, edge compute—the ability to process data in real time at the edge of a network (think a handheld device) without sending it back to the cloud to be processed—has to be the focus. Dugan explains: “When a robot senses something and sends that sensor data back to the application, which may be on-site, it may be in some edge compute location, the speed at which that data can be collected, transported to the application, analyzed, and a response generated, directly affects the speed at which that device can operate.” This data must be analyzed and acted on in real time to be useful to the organization. Think about it, continued Dugan, “When you’re controlling something like an energy grid, similar thing. You want to be able to detect something and react to it in near real time.” Edge compute is the function that allows organizations to enter the Fourth Industrial Revolution, and this is the new reality. “We're moving from that hype stage into reality and making it available for our customers,” Dugan notes. “And that's exciting when you see something become real like this.”
    Business Lab is hosted by Laurel Ruma, director of Insights, the custom publishing division of MIT Technology Review. The show is a production of MIT Technology Review, with production help from Collective Next.
    This podcast episode was produced in partnership with Lumen Technologies.
    Links
    “Emerging Technologies And The Lumen Platform,” Andrew Dugan, Automation.com, Sept 14, 2020
    “The Fourth Industrial Revolution: what it means, how to respond,” Klaus Schwab

    • 28 min
    How AI Will Revolutionize Manufacturing

    How AI Will Revolutionize Manufacturing

    Ask Stefan Jockusch about what a factory might look like in 10 or 20 years, and the answer might leave you at a crossroads between fascination and bewilderment. Jockusch is vice president for strategy at Siemens Digital Industries Software, which develops applications that simulates the conception, design, and manufacture of products such as a cell phone or a smart watch. His vision of a smart factory is abuzz with “independent, moving” robots. But they don’t stop at making one or three or five things. No—this factory is “self-organizing.”
    “Depending on what product I throw at this factory, it will completely reshuffle itself and work differently when I come in with a very different product,” Jockusch says. “It will self-organize itself to do something different.”
    Behind this factory of future is artificial intelligence (AI), Jockusch says in this episode of Business Lab. But AI starts much, much smaller, with the chip. Take automaking. The chips that power the various applications in cars today—and the driverless vehicles of tomorrow—are embedded with AI, which support real-time decision-making. They’re highly specialized, built with specific tasks in mind. The people who design chips then need to see the big picture.
    “You have to have an idea if the chip, for example, controls the interpretation of things that the cameras see for autonomous driving. You have to have an idea of how many images that chip has to process or how many things are moving on those images,” Jockusch says. “You have to understand a lot about what will happen in the end.”
    This complex way of building, delivering, and connecting products and systems is what Siemens describes as “chip to city”—the idea that future population centers will be powered by the transmission of data. Factories and cities that monitor and manage themselves, Jockusch says, rely on “continuous improvement”: AI executes an action, learns from the results, and then tweaks its subsequent actions to achieve a better result. Today, most AI is helping humans make better decisions.
    “We have one application where the program watches the user and tries to predict the command the user is going to use next,” Jockusch says. “The longer the application can watch the user, the more accurate it will be.”
    Applying AI to manufacturing, Jockusch says, can result in cost savings and big gains in efficiency. Jockusch gives an example from a Siemens factory of printed circuit boards, which are used in most electronic products. The milling machine used there has a tendency to “goo up over time—to get dirty.” The challenge is to determine when the machine has to be cleaned so it doesn’t fail in the middle of a shift.
    “We are using actually an AI application on an edge device that's sitting right in the factory to monitor that machine and make a fairly accurate prediction when it's time to do the maintenance,” Jockusch says.
    The full impact of AI on business—and the full range of opportunities the technology can uncover—is still unknown.
    “There's a lot of work happening to understand these implications better,” Jockusch says. “We are just at the starting point of doing this, of really understanding what can optimization of a process do for the enterprise as a whole.”
    Business Lab is hosted by Laurel Ruma, director of Insights, the custom publishing division of MIT Technology Review. The show is a production of MIT Technology Review, with production help from Collective Next.
    This podcast episode was produced in partnership with Siemens Digital Industries Software.

    • 25 min
    Smart Devices, a Cohesive System, a Brighter Future

    Smart Devices, a Cohesive System, a Brighter Future

    [Sponsored] AI advancements today are pointing to improvements everywhere you look. But it’s a confluence of technologies—cloud, 5G wireless, smart devices, and more—that will usher in the greatest results, predicts Dell Technologies’ John Roese.
    If you need a reason to feel good about the direction technology is going, look up Dell’s CTO John Roese on Twitter. The handle he composed back in 2006 is @theICToptimist. ICT stands for information and communication.
    “The reason for that acronym was because I firmly believed that the future was not about information technology and communication technology independently,” says Roese, president and chief technology officer of products and operations at Dell Technologies. “It was about them coming together.”
    Close to two decades later, it’s hard not to call him right. Organizations are looking to the massive amounts of data their collecting and generating to become fully digital, they’re using the cloud to process and store all that data, and they’re turning to fast, new wireless technologies like 5G to power data-hungry applications such as artificial intelligence and machine learning.
    In this episode of Business Lab, Roese walks through this confluence of technologies and its future outcomes. For example, autonomous vehicles are developing fast, but fully driverless cars aren’t plying are streets yet. And they won’t until they tap into a “collaborative compute model”—smart devices that plug into a combination of cloud and edge computing infrastructure to provide “effectively infinite compute.”
    “One of the biggest problems isn't making the device smart; it's making the device smart and efficient in a scalable system,” Roese says.
    So big things are ahead, but technology today is making huge strides, Roese says. He talks about machine intelligence, which taps AI and machine learning to mimic human intelligence and tackle complex problems, such as speeding up supply chains, or in health care, more accurately detecting tumors or types of cancer. And opportunities abound. During the coronavirus pandemic, machine intelligence can “scale nursing” by giving nurses data-driven tools that allow them to see more patients. In cybersecurity, it can keep good guys a step ahead of innovating bad guys. And in telecommunications, it could eventually make decisions regarding mobile networks “that might have a trillion things on them. That is a very, very, very large network that exceeds human's ability to think.”
    Business Lab is hosted by Laurel Ruma, director of Insights, the custom publishing division of MIT Technology Review. The show is a production of MIT Technology Review, with production help from Collective Next.
    This podcast episode was produced in partnership with Dell Technologies.

    Show notes and links
    Technical Disruptions Emerging in 2020, by John Roese
    The Journey to 5G: Extending the Cloud to Mobile Edges, EmTech Next 2020
    Meet John on Twitter, @theictoptimist
    The Fourth Industrial Revolution and digitization will transform Africa into a global powerhouse, by Njuguna Ndung’u and Landry Signé

    • 36 min
    Covid-19 Spurs Collaboration in Telehealth

    Covid-19 Spurs Collaboration in Telehealth

    [Sponsored] The coronavirus pandemic has led to enhanced collaboration, spurred innovation, and increased the use of digital technologies. Telehealth enables doctors to safely connect with patients virtually and to monitor them remotely, whether in different cities or just down the hall. And smarter and smaller medical devices are producing better outcomes for patients—a disruption is sensed, like low blood sugar or a too rapid beating heart, and a therapy is applied, in real time.
    All of this is aided by improved processing capabilities and data—lots of data, which means AI. And today’s guest is Dr. Laura Mauri, who is the Vice President of Global Clinical Research and Analytics at Medtronic. And she knows all about how data can help drive better patient outcomes, improve the patient experience, and provide valuable information for doctors and medical device creators. Dr. Mauri is an interventional cardiologist and one of the world’s leading experts on clinical trials, but, as she says, the success of a clinical trial really does come down to the patient experience, and how it's improved.
    Dr. Mauri also has great hope for healthcare and technology. And although she cautions that this work is not simple, you can literally see progress happening—which is the outcome we all want.
    Business Lab is hosted by Laurel Ruma, director of insights, the custom publishing division of MIT Technology Review. The show is a production of MIT Technology Review, with production help from Collective Next.
    Produced in partnership with Medtronic.

    Show notes and links
    “Unlocking the power of data in healthcare” A Q&A with Dr. Laura Mauri
    Open-Source Release Allows Coventor to Be Produced Worldwide
    Virtual training, remote monitoring solutions provide safety and support

    • 39 min
    Leading With a Security-First Mentality

    Leading With a Security-First Mentality

    [Sponsored] As technology rapidly develops, the number of security and privacy concerns will only continue to grow. In this episode, we look at how companies can build cybersecurity into their business strategies—instead of scrambling to respond when a breach happens.
    Even with danger lurking around the corner, today’s guest, cybersecurity expert Ann Cavoukian, argues that companies are turning a blind eye to security and privacy issues until it is too late. Cavoukian is the executive director of the Global Privacy and Security by Design Centre, as well as a senior fellow of the Ted Rogers Leadership Centre at Ryerson University. She’s worked closely with the government in Canada as well as private companies on the best way to defend against security attacks.
    Cavoukian also says that privacy is vital to our society and an indispensable form of freedom, and that developments such as facial recognition technology are among the most egregious breaches of that freedom.
    Business Lab is hosted by Laura Ruma, director of insights, the custom publishing division of MIT Technology Review. The show is a production of MIT Technology Review, with production help from Collective Next. Music is by Merlean, from Epidemic Sound. 
    Show notes and links
    Ann Cavoukian, Ryerson University
    Global Privacy and Security by Design
    “Microsoft presents Dr. Ann Cavoukian on privacy and your business,” YouTube
    “Dr Ann Cavoukian – Privacy By Design,” YouTube
    “Will Privacy First Be The New Normal? An Interview With Privacy Guru, Dr. Ann Cavoukian,” by Hessie Jones, Forbes
    “Dr. Ann Cavoukian: Why Big Business Should Proactively Build for Privacy,” by Hessie Jones, Forbes

    • 28 min
    More office devices are at risk for attack. Cybersecurity expert Ken Munro discusses the vulnerabilities to look out for, and how to stay secure.

    More office devices are at risk for attack. Cybersecurity expert Ken Munro discusses the vulnerabilities to look out for, and how to stay secure.

    [Sponsored] In this episode, we look at the need to secure the internet of things, physical workspaces, and the products companies make. From planes to children’s toys to oil rigs, more connected devices are vulnerable to attack than ever before.
    Ken Munro is an internet-of things security researcher, penetration tester, and writer with two decades of experience in the security industry. He is also the founder of security services company Pen Test Partners.
    Munro helps expose the vulnerabilities in items we use every day, and he discusses some of the most important skills that cybersecurity experts can have, why companies are at risk for physical security breaches, and something he calls “supersystemic flaws.” 
    Business Lab is hosted by Laurel Ruma, director of Insights, the custom publishing division of MIT Technology Review. The show is a production of MIT Technology Review, with production help from Collective Next. Music is by Merlean, from Epidemic Sound.

    Ken Munro, on Twitter
    Ken Munro, Pen Test Partners
    “Kids Tracker Watches: CloudPets, exploiting athletes and hijacking reality TV,” Pen Test Partners Security Blog
    “Think you’ve had a breach? Top 5 things to do,” Pen Test Partners Security Blog
     “Internet of Things Security,” a TEDx presentation by Ken Munro

    • 37 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
18 Ratings

18 Ratings

AHB28 ,

Too much cyber security

Please move on from the cyber security issues.

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