96 episodes

Daddy Unscripted is a podcast about being a Dad. Each episode is a loose conversation with the host and his guest, talking about their history with their own Dad, how they approach being a Dad, and how they manage doing so within their walk of life. Support this show at http://supporter.acast.com/daddyunscripted

Daddy Unscripted Podcast Osiris Media


    • Kids & Family
    • 5.0 • 38 Ratings

Daddy Unscripted is a podcast about being a Dad. Each episode is a loose conversation with the host and his guest, talking about their history with their own Dad, how they approach being a Dad, and how they manage doing so within their walk of life. Support this show at http://supporter.acast.com/daddyunscripted

    WHAT Makes Jess Rosado Feel Like An Odd Bird Out?

    WHAT Makes Jess Rosado Feel Like An Odd Bird Out?

    Episode 5 of "We're Here Alone Together" (W.H.A.T.) features Jess Rosado: blogger, photographer, designer, mom and creative extraordinaire. You should find her @OddBirdOut on Instagram really quick. Go go go.


    This is Episode 96 of the podcast. Jess and I have known each other since maybe 2005 or so, and we met via the world of Flickr. We talked a little about that early time, the social media platform we were on before the words "social media" were such a mainstay.


    Jess talked about how much more difficult Christmas in 2020 was for her, in comparison with previous years. Some of that was based on the pandemic... but she also talked about her kids being teens now completely changes the landscape of gift giving and celebration.


    We talked a bit about kids, allowances and chores. Being the youngest of 8 kids and growing up in the '70s and '80s, an "allowance" wasn't the same for me as it was for a lot of my friends. So, I was curious on Jess' take on it as a Mom of 2.


    I told a story about trying to trick/bribe (call it what you will) my 8 yr old into allowing us to listen to Prince on the 8-minute drive to his school every day for a month and how he wouldn't give in. Someone please help me with this struggle (sic).


    We bantered about expectations within the family relationship. I took a minor shot across the bow (sorry not sorry) toward the idea that a Father posting how he is "watching his kids while the Mom gets some 'me time' of her own" and people go out of their way to comment and tell the Dad what a great Dad he is being and how awesome that is. Don't do this.


    This wound up in us spending quite some time talking about homeschooling. Jess was homeschooled, herself, some time ago and obviously this has become a way more significant option with the pandemic. So, we really went through how that has changed a lot over the years and how it set Jess up for life and how she is handling it with her teens.


    How many of you with kids feel like they are way ahead of you in their understanding of technology? Yeah, we talked about that too. How timely this current world situation has been for just how tech-savvy younger people are. I have said this multiple times: if Covid had hit when previous generations were kids, I feel fairly comfortable saying that almost none of this schooling would have been possible. I know that a lot of people like to call the last school year a "lost year"... heck, Time magazine just had that as their cover story. I, for one, feel like that is a Bolshevik statement (can you say 'click bait'?) and a pretty harsh slap to the face of educators around the world, as well as to a lot of kids.


    I don't say that without an understanding and cushion statement that gets that a lot of kids didn't thrive; a lot of parents didn't do well. I know that everyone doesn't have great abilities to work through it (whether that is due to the infrastructure of wifi capabilities, or hardware issues, etc).


    As I say in each episode: for anyone who may need help during any difficult times: the National Suicide Prevention hotline: (800) 273-8255. Also, I have a Google Voice Number for ANY of you to use: (872) 444-6784. Leave me a message there and I will get in touch with you... or you can even just use that as a safe place to vent or whatever it may be. 


    You can listen to this conversation by finding the Daddy Unscripted podcast, wherever you listen to podcasts (Apple, Spotify, Stitcher, Tune In Radio, etc).


    Find and follow Jess and Odd Bird Out at the website for the blog at www.OddBirdOut.com
    Find and follow Jess on her Instagram at @OddBirdOut


    Daddy Unscripted can be found on:


    iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher Radio | Google Play | Tune-In Radio


    Twitter: @DaddyUnscripted
    Facebook: Daddy Unscripted
    Website: www.daddyunscripted.com


    Daddy Unscripted is proud to be a part of Osiris Media! You can check out

    • 1 hr 3 min
    The Her-Story of Rebekka Guðleifsdóttir, Pt. 2

    The Her-Story of Rebekka Guðleifsdóttir, Pt. 2

    Episode 95 features Icelandic visual artist Rebekka Guðleifsdóttir. Is there such a thing as "admiration at first sight" that is similar in its nature to the whole "love at first sight" thing? I have to assume there is... and that is what my relationship with Rebekka is rooted in. I'm excited that she becomes the first guest of my newest series: "Who Tells Your Story?"


    This is the second half of our long conversation. Did you listen to the 1st half? If you didn't... seriously, you need to go do that now. Even though this is kind of like my The Godfather I and The Godfather II, as good as this 2nd part is, you can't really take it in perfectly without taking in the 1st half. So, if you haven't done that, go do that now. Come back. This will still be here. 


    Okay, now that we're all on the same page and ready for part 2, let's move ahead as one. 


    "I actually spent one night in the hospital on suicide watch..." So, less than one minute into the 2nd half and we are really starting at a high level here because of where part 1 left off. Now you get why I said all of that just before, right? Right. 


    A very good point to not miss out on here is that this 24-hour "lockdown" was brought about because of Rebekka's ability to be very honest and humble with a trusted friend about the place her mind was at right then. And that friend was caring and smart about the information given to them. These are key components and I am so relieved and happy and proud of Rebekka for setting that into motion so that (and I don't say this lightly, as dramatic as it may sound) she is even still alive to have had this conversation with me. 


    With that said, Rebekka does say this was such a low point for her and that she felt "so pathetic" about it all. Totally understandable or acceptable as a later thought to what took place. But, you know what: I didn't ask her this, but I'm pretty sure she would say that 100 out of 100 times, she would take those feelings for the benefit of being alive today. I think that's a pretty fair assumption. 


    Rebekka retells how she took the painful and necessary steps to finally fully uncover what was really going on with her longtime boyfriend and the relationship he had fully created 'on the side'. She found what she had been expecting to and describes her sons being so glad to see her "reclaim her self-worth and her self-respect."


    The day she moved out of that relationship was a crazy adventure including a brokedown car being towed by her parents' car. "I lost my income and I lost my home and I lost my car. But, what I had was my kids and my parents and... obviously friends -- " Sometimes, it's not easy to see how much we have. It's easy to say that, of course. But, really. I mean that for myself, as well. 


    "That was obviously the biggest and most shocking and terrible thing that happened during that time..." This seems like a very apt description of Rebekka telling about how her sons' biological father took his own life in December of 2020. 


    Rebekka walks us through how she met her kids' Dad and the story of their dating relationship. "I will say that I never planned on having kids... at any point. I'd never even thought about it." The relationship and love that Rebekka and her sons have for each other goes to show how life sometimes has other ideas for us than what we think is right for ourselves. 


    When he fell in love with someone else and Rebekka had to move back into her parents' home. "It was just the most dreadfully depressing thing that you can imagine. There was no social media. I had not been in contact with any friends, because I didn't really have any friends before dating this guy. So I was completely isolated, back at home with my parents, with these two little kids..."


    She talks about how things got extremely unpleasant between her and her sons' Dad (who married the woman he had c

    • 1 hr 23 min
    The Her-Story of Rebekka Guðleifsdóttir, Pt. 1

    The Her-Story of Rebekka Guðleifsdóttir, Pt. 1

    Episode 94 features Icelandic visual artist Rebekka Guðleifsdóttir. Is there such a thing as "admiration at first sight" that is similar in its nature to the whole "love at first sight" thing? I have to assume there is... and that is what my relationship with Rebekka is rooted in. I'm excited that she becomes the first guest of my newest series: "Who Tells Your Story?"


    The year was 2005. I was dating my now wife. I was working at my old job that had me traveling around the world... quite a lot. I wish I could, but I can't recall what originally brought me to search up some type of photograph and led my internet search into a website called Flickr. To give perspective, this is 4 years before Instagram. Facebook was only available to college students at this time. Nobody was using the words "social media" in a meaningful way yet. 


    As I wandered around photos on Flickr, something caught my eye and lassoed my imagination. It was what seemed to be a long exposure shot (one of a few she posted around that time) that made it look like there were two of her laying down. 


    "... I don't even remember how I got the idea of tossing up this apple and catching it in midair..." That was how Rebekka described this photograph that ended up being one of the handful of catalysts for her photography getting noticed far and wide. 


    When we talked about the older photos from her Flickr page, Rebekka talked about how exciting that time was for her. She said that she was taking photos every day and experimenting and having so much fun with this new art form for her. 


    I reminded Rebekka about how I paid homage to her once or twice in my 365 project on Flickr. Here is an example of that from one of her popular multiplicity, or clone, images. 


    "Iceland was basically in the 'Dark Ages' until around World War II, basically..." Rebekka really dug deep for her memories of family members in her past beyond her own parents. She briefly talked about how rough life would have been for her grandparents in old-world Iceland. I got a little schooling in some of the history of Iceland that I had totally not been aware of previously. 


    "My Mom is just really bad-ass." What Rebekka shared about her Mom absolutely falls in line with that sentence. 


    Rebekka touched a little bit on what the effect can be on a child when they are told "you are special," when it comes to scholastics and things of that nature. 


    "As soon as I realized what I had when I was in Florida" as opposed to her life when she returned to Iceland as a pre-teen, gave Rebekka a significant shock to her psyche and moved her into depression at a young age. She really retreated during those school days.


    Having a sketchbook around her constantly and honing her craft of drawing is what Rebekka will point at having saved her from becoming the outcast that may have been made fun of by others. She says she may still have been considered "the weirdo", her work with art elevated her status a bit and gained some respect from her peers. She thinks it is what kept her going through times of being shy and miserable while in school. "I would sometimes go an entire day without opening my mouth". 


    Rebekka talks about seeing a documentary on women with autism. The documentary, which translated into English is "Seeing The Unseen", can be seen in full on Vimeo and you can connect with them on Twitter @unseenautism


    As Rebekka watched and listened to the women in the film discuss their lives, things really started to click into place for her. She remembered the many times she'd been asked: "Why can't you just be normal?" and the answer was and is: "Because I'm not. I'm just not."


    This all struck a tremendous chord with me. There was an unavoidable resounding bell ringing in my head the first time we started looking at things regarding autism and early assessment for my daughter so many year

    • 1 hr 22 min
    Our Mental Health In 2021

    Our Mental Health In 2021

    Episode 93 is the first of 2021 and a brief check-in for all of us on our mental well-being. Literally for all of us: myself very much included.


    The world has changed a ton for a lot of us since we turned the pages on calendars from 2020 to 2021. Or has it? That's an actual question I wanted to sit down with for this episode. 


    2020 was not the best year ever for so many of us. I feel pretty safe saying that. I mean, unless you're Jeff Bezos or one of the other billionaires that just got even more disgustingly wealthy during the past year. Emphasis on that word 'disgusting', by the way.


    The transition to a new year tends to bring that big energy of leaving things in the past and moving into the fresh, shiny newness with some level of optimism. 2021 feels like it was the polar opposite calendar page-turn of the year 2000, with all of the y2k fear. 


    So, what happened? What changed? I sat with that for a minute or 5 and came away with the reality that, aside from the literal calendar change: nothing changed. We were all still in the middle of this pandemic. Our planet had shifted as much as it would any normal day, but that didn't "fix" things. 


    We were less than 3 weeks away from a significant leadership change here in the U.S. For some of us, that represented an enormous light at the end of what had been a very long and dark tunnel. But, let's be real: for others, it didn't. I assume we are all familiar with how that goes for any presidential election.


    6 days into the new year, there was an insurrection at our nation's capitol. Something unlike anything our generation has ever witnessed. Not here. Not in these United (??) States of America.


    Insert an entire paragraph about the women there that day. Insert an entire post about the brilliance that the youngest Inaugural poet laureate Amanda Gorman brought to the day.


    And, here we all are. The pandemic is still a thing. Trumpism is still a thing. People are still trying to figure out how to live through massive tragedy and hardship right now.


    Change takes time. It takes hard work and a lot of it. As conscientious as I may be about the reality and obviousness of it, I have still had to remind myself there was never a magic wand. No instantaneous betterment was coming on January 1 or January 20.


    I've needed to come to terms with that fact more than once. This has driven me to work harder to focus (again) on my mental health. To get back into a steady routine of meditation. To find moments, as I need them, of quiet or of mindless distraction at other times. Reading a book, listening to music... even times of listening to the sound of the world outside: the wind in the trees... the rain falling.


    I know that not a lot of men are comfortable with the idea of discussing mental health. To some, it displays weakness or inferiority. To many, it may be something that could be so helpful, if they could open themselves up to the idea. So, I have been talking about this on my social media, but if you do something for your mental health: share it with us. Let's help each other and others learn and think of some new ways to help themselves.


    I've said it in this episode a lot, but share your stories with the hashtag of #MyMentalHealth to make it easy to find.


    You can listen to this conversation by finding the Daddy Unscripted podcast, wherever you listen to podcasts (Apple, Spotify, Stitcher, Tune In Radio, etc).


    As I say in each episode: for anyone who may need help during any difficult times: the National Suicide Prevention hotline: (800) 273-8255. Also, I have a Google Voice Number for ANY of you to use: (872) 444-6784. Leave me a message there and I will get in touch with you... or you can even just use that as a safe place to vent or whatever it may be. 


    Daddy Unscripted can be found on:


    iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher Radio | Google Play | Tune-In Radio


    Twi

    • 43 min
    2020 Yields A Bountiful Thanksgiving Cornucopia

    2020 Yields A Bountiful Thanksgiving Cornucopia

    Episode 92 is my 3rd Thanksgiving episode. Last year's episode was heavily inspired by the life of Mr. Rogers and featured an inspiring message and challenge based on the kindness represented by Mr. Rogers' legacy. This year's episode is painted more with the current landscape of our country and, really, our planet during the fall and winter months of 2020. 


    With everything going on in the world right now, I decided to just take some of it on with this solo, guest-less episode. I think, in the end, it allows me to be more thankful and grateful if I'm not straight up trying to avoid or dance around the obvious. 


    I started by sharing the relief I felt with the (apparent) election of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris as the president and vice president elect. I analyzed some of the fear I have heard some people express about what that may mean for USA; I tried to talk through a little of my confusion with that mindset while coming to terms with how that may feel valid to people that don't share my same ideas.


    The second section of the episode was a bit more personal. If you've heard my prior episodes during this time of the year, you know that this is around the time that the anniversary of my Dad's death comes around. It's also the anniversary of my eldest sister's death. This year, my wife's Dad succumbed to cancer not too long ago. So, it's all just piling on. This of course, also coincides with my birthday (which happens to be the day that I'm releasing this episode, oddly enough). 


    So, I spent a bit of time exploring how all of that impacts my life right now, and the dynamic of my family. With the state of the world in mind, it was impossible to not connect that with all of the loss that so many humans are experiencing right now. A lot of us are possibly getting used to the ridiculously high numbers of human loss occurring on a daily basis in so many parts of the world right now. Stopping to think about that for just a few minutes is incredibly saddening. 


    The final part of what I called my Cornucopia episode focused on a challenge of inspiration to all of you (and to myself, too). When was the last time you wrote a letter to someone? I mean: wrote. With your hand and a pen? When was the last time you wrote one and mailed it to someone? Is it so crazy to think about writing a letter even to someone who lives in your home and still mailing it to your home for them? How about sending out voice texts of love to people you care about? It is a pretty simple challenge... and maybe that makes it better, because I know so many of you can easily find success with this.  


    Oh, a little bit of news. I finally put to rest the idea that I may do a complete branding overhaul of Daddy Unscripted. That's not happening. Rather, with the additional section of the podcast that I created with the W.H.A.T. series ("We're Here Alone Together"), I announced I will have another side series called "Who Tells Your Story" that will involve me having an even more diverse set of guests on the podcast to do exactly what Daddy Unscripted has always strived to do: document the lives of all of you amazing people out there.


    You can listen to this conversation by finding the Daddy Unscripted podcast, wherever you listen to podcasts (Apple, Spotify, Stitcher, Tune In Radio, etc).


    As I say in each episode: for anyone who may need help during any difficult times: the National Suicide Prevention hotline: (800) 273-8255. Also, I have a Google Voice Number for ANY of you to use: (872) 444-6784. Leave me a message there and I will get in touch with you... or you can even just use that as a safe place to vent or whatever it may be. 


    Daddy Unscripted can be found on:


    iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher Radio | Google Play | Tune-In Radio


    Twitter: @DaddyUnscripted
    Facebook: Daddy Unscripted
    Website: www.daddyunscripted.com


    Daddy Unscripted is proud to

    • 51 min
    Chris Colbert Reminds Us To Say Their Name

    Chris Colbert Reminds Us To Say Their Name

    Episode 91 features Chris Colbert, the CEO of DCP Entertainment, which just launched a new show titled "Say Their Name". We talk about that podcast a lot in this episode, let me first tell you about Chris. He began his career in audio production over a decade ago as an intern and consultant for Sirius Satellite Radio (now SiriusXM Radio). While simultaneously earning his degree from Seton Hall University, he helped create Oscar and Grammy award winner Jamie Foxx’s comedy and music channel “The Foxxhole.”


    Upon successful completion and tremendous success with “The Foxxhole,” Chris joined SiriusXM full time and helped create “Carlin’s Corner”, a 24/7 George Carlin comedy channel, and “Que Funny”, SiriusXM’s only bilingual Latino comedy channel. He also oversaw programming and operations for “Urban View” and “Blue Collar Radio” (now “Jeff & Larry’s Comedy Roundup”). In addition to SiriusXM’s permanent stations, Chris also worked on pop-up channels such as “Richard Pryor Radio”, “Star Wars Radio”, “Comic Con Radio”, and “E3 Radio.”


    As Director of Urban Talk and Comedy for SiriusXM, Chris worked on several audio documentaries. These documentaries provided his transition to the role of Vice President of Programming for Cadence13 (formerly DGital Media). While at Cadence13, he oversaw all documentary projects and produced top podcasts such as “Cover Up”, “Origins”, “What Really Happened”, and “Majority 54.”


    Having worked with names like Jamie Foxx, Touré, James Andrew Miller, Joy-Ann Reid, Zak Levitt, Andrew Jenks, Joe Madison, ESSENCE, PEOPLE, Crooked Media, Sports Illustrated, WME, and the United Negro College Fund, Chris specializes in media partnerships and content development.


    With a passion for connecting audiences with innovative and inspiring content, Chris founded DCP Entertainment; a place to bring together audio and visual storytelling that highlight underrepresented communities and conversations.


    We talked a lot about mental health in this episode. We covered DCP's new podcast "Say Their Name" as well, which was a significant part of my wanting to talk with Chris in the first place. Say Their Name talks with loved ones of the victims of either police brutality or senseless killing at the hands of other civilians. Chris talks about how he realized in 2018 that he wanted to do something that honored the lives that were being lost unnecessarily.


    DCP Entertainment is your destination for the underrepresented voice, sharing stories you won’t find anywhere else. Giving a platform to people of color, women, and LGBTQ+ communities, as well as highlighting stories around mental health, disability, and overcoming adversity, DCP presents stories that we can all relate to. With a focus on improving the world around us, DCP’s podcast and video series go beyond entertainment and provide perspectives and lessons that can create positive movements.


    DCP Entertainment's Podcasts include: “Democracy-ish,” “Make It Plain,” “Toure Show,” “Woke AF,” “Picked Last in Gym Class,” and “Inner Space.”
    For more information, visit www.dcpofficial.com and follow @DCPofficial on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.




    As I say in each episode: for anyone who may need help during any difficult times: the National Suicide Prevention hotline: (800) 273-8255. Also, I have a Google Voice Number for ANY of you to use: (872) 444-6784. Leave me a message there and I will get in touch with you... or you can even just use that as a safe place to vent or whatever it may be.


    You can listen to this conversation by finding the Daddy Unscripted podcast, wherever you listen to podcasts (Apple, Spotify, Stitcher, Tune In Radio, etc).


    Daddy Unscripted can be found on:


    iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher Radio | Google Play | Tune-In Radio


    Twitter: @DaddyUnscr

    • 1 hr 20 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
38 Ratings

38 Ratings

nigelthewonderdog ,

Insightful and Interesting

Tim does such a great job with this podcast, coaxing stories from people like me and sharing them with the world. I've loved listening to other dads share their stories, and learned so much about people I would have never known. Good stuff.

Southern Songs and Stories ,

Real, meaningful conversation

Time Wheaton is consistently producing thoughtful and compelling podcasts in this series. I have enjoyed his guests, his interviewing style, and the overall quality of his work. Even if you are not a dad, this podcast will offer something of substance that you can appreciate.

3 kidlets ,

Perspective that matters!

Thank you Tim for taking the time, effort and energy to create something that helps all of us relate to the struggles and more importantly the joys of fatherhood. It's easy to get lost in the reasons we work or spend time away from our families as dads sometimes but this podcast reminds us of our most important and most enjoyable job, being a good dad.

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