25 episodes

A podcast produced by the Society of Economic Geologists (SEG), bringing you geoscience and technology stories from the world of ore deposits. Season 2 sponsored by Goldspot Discoveries.

Discovery to Recovery Society of Economic Geologists

    • Science
    • 4.5 • 4 Ratings

A podcast produced by the Society of Economic Geologists (SEG), bringing you geoscience and technology stories from the world of ore deposits. Season 2 sponsored by Goldspot Discoveries.

    Episode 25: Tales of Giants and Trailblazers - 100 Years of SEG

    Episode 25: Tales of Giants and Trailblazers - 100 Years of SEG

    Join us for a Fireside Chat full of inspiring and quirky stories, first presented at #SEG100. We  are celebrating 100 years of SEG as 2021 comes to a close. These are stories worth hearing!

    Russell Meares, a long time SEG volunteer and well known exploration geologist shares what he has learned through his years of digging up the less well known stories of the founders of the Society. Anne Thompson has also worked to unearth the lesser known members and find out the stories behind our early women members. We hope you enjoy and wish all of you a happy holiday season.

    This is the last episode in Season 2 of Discovery to Recovery.  We will take a break for a few months and then plan to be back again with a new season in 2022! Many thanks to all our listeners. We appreciate you.

    • 29 min
    Episode 24: Supergene Secrets

    Episode 24: Supergene Secrets

    What are you standing on? There are secrets to be discovered in those grungy red, black and brown rocks! Deconvolution of the weathering process is critical to understanding our Earth and for exploration in both arid and humid environments.

    We have two extremely knowledgeable guests, who have spent their careers working in this environment. They talk about the 'messy' rocks and discuss the information hidden in superficial alteration that is important for exploration, landscape evolution and paleo-climate.

    William Chavez, Jr., a professor at New Mexico Tech, USA, spoke to us about the arid environment and enrichment of mineralization in the porphyry copper environment. Bill has years of experience, with special interest in what are now arid landscapes and insights into mapping in a variety of landscapes and environments.

    The geochronology of weathering processes is key to understanding not only ore deposits, but also paleo-climate and perhaps even processes on Mars. Paulo Vasconcelos, an associate professor at the University of Queensland, Australia, shares his knowledge as a trailblazer in in age-dating oxide minerals with examples from Brazil. We also delved into how to restore the ‘kanga’ over iron ore deposits and why understanding the process of weathering will help restoration of the landscape. Above all else, we need to work to understand weathered rocks, such that all the rest of our interpretations are founded on quality mapping!
    Theme music is Confluence by Eastwinds
    eastwindsmusic.com

    • 48 min
    Episode 23: Models, Drobbles, and Data in Magmatic Sulfide Deposits

    Episode 23: Models, Drobbles, and Data in Magmatic Sulfide Deposits

    Magmatic sulfide deposits have arguably the most quantified deposit model, but what are the game changers in our understanding? Despite a decades old foundational model for their formation, what is new and what should be considered in the search for new resources? This episode checks in with an expert in magmatic sulfides engaged in the global pursuit as well as those researching emerging ideas that shed new light on the model, including some which have implications for exploration.

    Peter Lightfoot, Lightfoot Geoscience and adjunct professor Western University,  began his career in academia and at a survey, but then seized the opportunity to make the switch to exploration and has never looked back. He gives us his five game changers in the understanding of the ore deposit model for magmatic sulfides, from mineral systems to big data and structural analysis.

    The recognition of ‘drobbles’ – the coalescence of vapor and sulfides in the formation of magmatic sulfide ores stems from how we ask questions, the scale of observation and fundamental experimental work. Margaux Le Vallaint, CSIRO, Kensington, W.A., Australia, talks about her research into the role of gases in the formation of Norilsk massive Ni deposit, with implications for the Permian-Triassic extinction event.

    In the lead up to the early career Pt Symposium, in May 2022  (check it out on the MagSul website), keynote speaker, Eduardo Mansur,  Norges Geologiske Undersøkelse,  talks about developments in mineral analysis and potential applications for exploration. Plus, what does an early career scientist think the future holds for the science of magmatic sulfide deposits?

    Theme music is Confluence by Eastwinds
    eastwindsmusic.com

    • 58 min
    Episode 22:Ore Body Knowledge

    Episode 22:Ore Body Knowledge

    What does better ore body knowledge do for mining? Consistency in our data collection, ore sorting at the mine face and detailed characterization of mine waste, can all lead to value creation coupled with more responsible mining. This episode looks at all aspects of the mining value chain, learning where new technology, data analysis and approaches are already having an impact.

    Datarock is a Melbourne, Australia company working to extract high quality data from images. They analyze images and are creating expert in loop systems to augment what the geoscientist can do.  Brenton Crawford, Chief Operations Officer and founder, lays out why the type of work they do is important for our industry.

    Mine resource models are constrained by spacing of data collection.  To solve this problem, MineSense Technologies developed ShovelSense.  Maarten Haest, VP Geoscience explains the technology and the value created by having a system that sorts ore from waste at the mine face.

    The legacy of mining includes tailings storage facilities. Anita Parbhakar-Fox is at the Sustainable Minerals Institute, University of Queensland specializing in studying tailings, finding the value left behind and the potential for waste to be a resource. Her work also sheds light on what is in the ore body, possibly leading to extraction of more metal.

    Theme music is Confluence by Eastwinds
    eastwindsmusic.com

    • 56 min
    Episode 21: The Philosophy of Resource Estimation

    Episode 21: The Philosophy of Resource Estimation

    For the average exploration geologist, resource estimation may appear a bit of a nebulous process, disconnected from the early stages of drilling and discovery. On this week’s episode we try and bridge the gap between the first drill hole into a project and the associated estimation process.

    First, we talk to Jacqui Coombes (CEO of AMIRA and based in Perth, Australia). Jacqui introduces the fundamental concepts that underpin resource estimation; breaking down complex ideas into simple terms. She also describes the qualitative side of the process, emphasizing the value of good geology, good communication and logic in any resource estimation.

    Our next guest, Rene Sterk (managing director at RSC Consulting and based in Dunedin, New Zealand) tells us why the exploration geologist should care about resource estimation. He describes the importance of the mining value chain as a whole, and how the data collected early on in a project can be critical to understanding an orebody.

    Theme music is Confluence by Eastwinds
    eastwindsmusic.com

    • 49 min
    Episode 20: A Deep Dive on a Frontier for Resources

    Episode 20: A Deep Dive on a Frontier for Resources

    The seafloor remains one of the least explored areas on Earth. Join us for a deep dive, to understand the science needed to advance our understanding and help to find the mineral resources that may well be needed by society in the future.

    We get the overview on both the history and the future from Mark Hannington (University of Ottawa, Canada). From the collaboration involved in studying black smokers and their relationship to what we know about volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, to the new frontiers of the continental shelf and beyond – there is a lot of greenfield exploration to happen in the ocean. How can we begin to understand the potential, without a geologic map? Perhaps what is needed is a Geological Survey of the Ocean.

    Our second guest, Meg Stewart (Mount Royal University Calgary, Alberta, Canada) tackles the seafloor geologic mapping question. As a post-doctoral fellow with Mark Hannington she took on the mapping of the Lau Basin, home to numerous hydrothermal vents and, as they discovered, complicated tectonic processes with implications for our understanding of earth systems.

    Lastly, we address the potential for polymetallic nodules to provide metals needed for the green transition. Samantha Smith (Blue Globe Solutions) has dedicated sixteen years to helping guide the science needed to exploit seabed resources responsibly and gives us her insights and wisdom.

    Theme music is Confluence by Eastwinds
    eastwindsmusic.com

    • 59 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

XHimpx ,

Very informative

This is a very informative and interesting podcast. Excellent discussion by the experts. I look forward to listening to many more of these podcasts. I wish the commentator on the last podcast would have left the assinine “Elitist “ comments out. True science has no room for the stench of politics or political correctness.

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