31 episodes

Sound Mind Live and Consequence of Sound present Going There. Hosted by licensed clinical psychologist Dr. Mike, the weekly series aims to create a safe space for musicians to have honest, healthy conversations about mental health.

Each episode covers the experience of artists and creatives as it pertains to specific issues, be it depression, anxiety, addiction, whatever they bring to the table. In the end, the goal is to de-stigmatize these topics and learn from each other.

So, join us at the crossroads where music and mental health meet.

Going There with Dr. Mike Consequence Podcast Network

    • Music
    • 4.5 • 15 Ratings

Sound Mind Live and Consequence of Sound present Going There. Hosted by licensed clinical psychologist Dr. Mike, the weekly series aims to create a safe space for musicians to have honest, healthy conversations about mental health.

Each episode covers the experience of artists and creatives as it pertains to specific issues, be it depression, anxiety, addiction, whatever they bring to the table. In the end, the goal is to de-stigmatize these topics and learn from each other.

So, join us at the crossroads where music and mental health meet.

    How UPSAHL Coped with Breakup Anxiety

    How UPSAHL Coped with Breakup Anxiety

    It's common to struggle with anxiety following a difficult breakup, something UPSAHL knows all too well. She joined Dr. Mike Friedman on the Going There podcast to discuss how she dealt with being in her feelings.

    One of the things that is so difficult about breakups is how central our relationships, particularly romantic ones, can be in our lives. Thus when we have a split, it can feel like our whole being has been undermined. UPSAHL talks about feeling like her sense of self was so rattled that she was having an “identity crisis.” In this episode of Going There, she reveals how she understood and managed her anxiety.

    Make sure to like and follow Going There with Dr. Mike wherever you listen to your podcasts, and check out the Consequence Podcast Network for updates on all our shows.

    To make your voice heard our ask a question for our monthly “Ask Dr. Mike” column, use this link to fill out a short questionnaire.

    Going There is an interview series presented by Consequence and Sound Mind Live. Clinical psychologist and life coach Dr. Mike Friedman talks with musicians about the crossroads where music and mental health meet. Musicians who have stepped up to share their wonderful work with us are now sharing the intimate details of their journey in living with mental illness. Dr. Mike asks the tough questions and has the difficult conversations, so that we can shine a light on the difficult topic of mental illness so we can all come out of the darkness, put an end to the stigma of mental illness, and get the care we need.

    • 39 min
    Dorothy Martin on the Power of Spirituality in Addiction Recovery

    Dorothy Martin on the Power of Spirituality in Addiction Recovery

    Dorothy Martin, namesake and vocalist for the band Dorothy, shares her struggle with addiction, trauma, and suicidality on the latest episode of Going There with Dr. Mike from Consequence and Sound Mind Live.

    The “What's Coming to Me” discusses the emotional and spiritual issues that often accompany addiction and mental illness in general, including not being comfortable in social situations and feeling disconnected and isolated from others. She also recounts a recent relapse, and the guilt and shame that can surround us when we drink after being sober.

    Dorothy further talks about how she has coped with addiction in general, as well as this relapse, in particular through spirituality. For her, she finds the concepts of forgiveness and grace as key to her ongoing recovery and sobriety. So let's go there with Dorothy by listening to the episode above.

    Make sure to like and follow Going There with Dr. Mike wherever you listen to your podcasts, and check out the Consequence Podcast Network for updates on all our shows. Going There with Dr. Mike wants to hear from our audience. Using this link, fill out a short questionnaire and submit questions for our monthly “Ask Dr. Mike” column.

    • 54 min
    Nikki Sixx on How the "Beast" of Stress and Trauma Can Lead to Substance Abuse

    Nikki Sixx on How the "Beast" of Stress and Trauma Can Lead to Substance Abuse

    This November, Going There is focusing on stories of substance abuse and addiction, and helping us launch this block of themed episodes is Mötley Crüe member Nikki Sixx.

    The co-founding bassist and songwriter joins Dr. Mike Friedman to share how traumatic life events contributed to his addiction, and how he has been able to maintain sobriety for 20 years. The Grammy Award-nominated musician describes how he experienced multiple stressful and traumatic events in his life including abuse, neglect, and concussions from football – all of which can have an impact on mental and physical health. He opens up about how traumas like these are a beast with multiple tentacles that can tear us down, leaving us vulnerable to substance use.

    Sixx, who's new book is called The First 21, explains how traumatic events can create emotional chaos and confusion, making it more difficult and complicated to connect with ourselves and achieve emotional well- being. When we feel so confused, empty, and in pain, we look to simple things that make us feel connected. Sometimes it can be something healthy like music, while others it’s substances like drugs or alcohol that temporarily soothe us.

    Sixx details how understanding what functional benefits he received from using has helped him understand what needs required fulfilling as he worked on recovery. He also uses this same thought process to help others with their own recovery. We must remember that addiction is still a mental illness, and it is crucial that we treat people who struggle with addiction with dignity and respect, seeing them as a whole human being trying to figure out their lives and how substances have played a role in that journey up until this point. That gives us the best balance of empathizing and being compassionate as we help people in their ongoing recovery.

    So let's go there with Nikki Sixx and listening to his discussion on substance abuse above.

    • 37 min
    rationale.'s Dan Lambton on Managing Bipolar Disorder

    rationale.'s Dan Lambton on Managing Bipolar Disorder

    This week on Going There, pop punk musician and mental health advocate Dan Lambton opens up about managing his bipolar disorder.

    A member of rationale. and formerly Real Friends, Lambton has long shared his struggles with bipolar disorder, in which he describes a fairly predictable cycle. He will feel more at baseline, where according to him he is able to function with his day-to-day life, and then experience a manic episode that is characterized by racing thoughts and pressured speech in which he is talking very quickly. While he says these times can be creatively productive, they're also damaging to his health, including not being able to sleep or eat. Then comes depressive episodes with their lower moods and lack of productivity.

    Lambton joins Dr. Mike on Going There to discuss how he manages his bipolar disorder with a regimen of medication and group therapy.

    We'd love our audience's feedback about the show, so fill out the form at this link to share your thoughts. You can also submit questions for our monthly “Ask Dr. Mike” column.

    Make sure to like and follow Going There with Dr. Mike wherever you get your podcasts to keep up to date on our weekly episodes, and stay tuned to the Consequence Podcast Network for updates on all our shows.

    • 59 min
    How Mary Lambert Makes Mental Health More "Legible"

    How Mary Lambert Makes Mental Health More "Legible"

    Musician Mary Lambert shares her struggle with bipolar disorder on the latest episode of Going There with Dr. Mike.

    The Grammy Award-nominated singer-songwriter speaks with Dr. Mike Friedman about how she experienced both manic episodes -- in which she seemed more elated, energized or grandiose -- and depressive episodes where she had no energy and was unable to do even basic tasks. These episodes often felt like they come out of nowhere, leaving her feeling trapped by a biological process over which she had no control.

    The singer-songwriter has been a long-time mental health activist. Talking with Dr. Mike, she explained she is trying to make mental health "legible" to reduce the stigma of mental illness. We need to focus on understanding our mental health rather than shaming and judging ourselves so we can help ourselves cope and heal.

    We'd love our audience's feedback about the show, so fill out the form at this link to share your thoughts. You can also submit questions for our monthly “Ask Dr. Mike” column.

    Make sure to like and follow Going There with Dr. Mike wherever you get your podcasts to keep up to date on our weekly episodes, and stay tuned to the Consequence Podcast Network for updates on all our shows. 

    • 55 min
    Phantogram's Sarah Barthel on Coping with Traumatic Loss

    Phantogram's Sarah Barthel on Coping with Traumatic Loss

    Musician Sarah Barthel of Phantogram joins Dr. Mike Friedman on the Going There podcast to share her struggle with devastating and traumatic loss in her life. The Phantogram singer has been a fantastic mental health advocate over the years, and has been very forthcoming and outspoken about how she not only lost her sister, Becky, when she committed suicide, but also had previously lost her father to cancer, and coped with her mother and other friends having the disease. What the “You Don’t Get High Anymore” artist describes is years of different devastating losses one on top of another and how this repetitive loss can be traumatic to us. Such loss can be overwhelmingly horrible, not only because we lost people close to us, but also because it undermines our fundamental belief that we live in a safe and predictable world. And our sense that we are safe and that we have some level of control over our lives is critical to our own mental health and well-being. One of the things that Barthel talks about is how in the face of this loss, she tries to be a “superhero” who needs to be the one who says everything is ok, and tries to make it so. The problem is that often when we try to be strong for others, we inadvertently close off our own emotional processing, avoiding or suppressing the intense feelings that come from facing the suffering of others, or our own suffering. Barthel explains how she turned to music as a way of understanding, processing, and expressing her feelings in the face of devastating and traumatic situations. So let’s go there with Phantogram's Sarah Barthel by listening to the full episode above.

    • 54 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
15 Ratings

15 Ratings

Mitch Pileggi ,

The Dr. Is in!

Dr. Mike has the voice of an angel and the ears of the greatest friend you never knew you had. Hearing these stories on a weekly basis has been a great escape from the terror and anxiety of 2020. More please!

xpolamalu_43x ,

Super insightful

I’m really loving this podcast of Dr. Mike’s. The topics of discussion on mental health issues with various artists is helpful and great to listen to!!

BlueTantawy ,

Perfect

I'm in love with the series

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