184 episodes

Hackaday Editors take a look at all of the interesting uses of technology that pop up on the internet each week. Topics cover a wide range like bending consumer electronics to your will, designing circuit boards, building robots, writing software, 3D printing interesting objects, and using machine tools. Get your fix of geeky goodness from new episodes every Friday morning.

Hackaday Podcast Hackaday

    • Technology
    • 4.9 • 44 Ratings

Hackaday Editors take a look at all of the interesting uses of technology that pop up on the internet each week. Topics cover a wide range like bending consumer electronics to your will, designing circuit boards, building robots, writing software, 3D printing interesting objects, and using machine tools. Get your fix of geeky goodness from new episodes every Friday morning.

    3D Printing with Volcano Nuts, The Hackaday Bookshelf, and a Puzzlebot

    3D Printing with Volcano Nuts, The Hackaday Bookshelf, and a Puzzlebot

    This week, Editor-in-Chief Elliot Williams and Assignments Editor Kristina Panos convened in a secret location to say what we will about the choicest hacks of the past week. We kick things off by discussing the brand new Cyberdeck contest, which is the first of it's type, but certainly won't be the last. In other contest news, we recently announced the winners of the Hack it Back Challenge of the Hackaday Prize, which ran the gamut from bodysnatching builds to rad resto-mods and resto-recreations.
    Taking top honors in wow factor this week is [Stuff Made Here]'s jigsaw puzzle-solving robot. This monster can currently tackle small laser-cut puzzles, but is destined to solve an all-white 5000-piece nightmare once all the engineering pieces have come together.
    Then we took a field trip to Zip Tie City, where the plastic's green  and the wiring's pretty, admired volcano nuts from afar, and briefly considered the idea of a 3D printer with a heating zone of programmable length.
    Finally, we take a look at a creatively destructive robot that's akin to a useless machine, bloviate about books you should read, and dance around the topic of learning by playing.
    You want to click the links in the show notes, no?

    • 51 min
    Tiny CRTs, Springy PCBs, and Measuring Trees

    Tiny CRTs, Springy PCBs, and Measuring Trees

    This week, Editor-in-Chief Elliot Williams and Assignments Editor Kristina Panos traded sweat for silence, recording from their respective attic-level offices in the August heat unaided by fans (too noisy). We decided there's no real news this week that lacks a political bent, except maybe that Winamp is back with a new version that's four years in the making. (Is Winamp divisive?) Does it still whip the llama's ass? You be the judge.
    After Elliot gives Kristina a brief math lesson in increasing area with regard to 3D printer nozzle sizes, we talk a bit about 3D pens, drool over a truly customizable macropad that uses a microcontroller for each keyswitch, and  discuss dendrometers and tree health. Then it's back to keyboards for one incredible modular build with an e-ink display and haptic feedback knob which is soon to go open source.
    Finally, we talk tiny CRTs, a USB drive that must have the ultimate in security through obscurity, discuss the merits of retrograde clocks, and wonder aloud about the utility of jumping PCBs. Don't bounce on us just yet -- not until you hear about our first electronics wins and learn the one thing Kristina doesn't do when she's spending all day in the heat.
    Check out Hackaday for all the links!

    • 48 min
    Danger Chess, Corona Motors, an Omni-Walker, and a Fast Talking Telescope

    Danger Chess, Corona Motors, an Omni-Walker, and a Fast Talking Telescope

    Join Hackaday Editor-in-Chief Elliot Williams and Staff Writer Dan Maloney for their take on the hottest hacks in a hot, hot week. We found a bunch of unusual mechanisms this week, like an omnidirectional robot that's not quite wheeled but not quite a walker either. Or, if you'd rather fly, there's a UAV that's basically a flying propeller. There's danger afoot too, with news of a chess-playing robot with a nasty streak, a laser engraver that'll probably blind you, and a high-voltage corona motor that actually does useful work. We'll use our X-ray vision to take a deep dive into a 60-GHz phased array antenna, let a baby teach a machine what it means to be hungry, and build a couple of toy cameras just for funsies. Ballons as a UI? Maybe someday, thanks to ultrasonic levitation. And we'll wrap things up by snooping in on the Webb telescope's communications, as we find out how many people it takes to make wire harnesses. Spoiler alert: it's a lot.
    Check out the links in the show notes!

    • 1 hr 13 min
    The Return of Supercon, Victory for Open Source, Exquisite Timepieces, and Documentation to Die For

    The Return of Supercon, Victory for Open Source, Exquisite Timepieces, and Documentation to Die For

    Hackaday Editor-in-Chief Elliot Williams and Managing Editor Tom Nardi start this week's podcast off with an announcement the community has been waiting years for: the return of the Hackaday Supercon! While there's still some logistical details to hammer out, we're all extremely excited to return to a live con and can't wait to share more as we get closer to November. Of course you can't have Supercon without the Hackaday Prize, which just so happens to be wrapping up its Hack it Back challenge this weekend.
    In other news, we'll talk about the developing situation regarding the GPLv3 firmware running on Ortur's laser engravers (don't worry, it's good news for a change), and a particularly impressive fix that kept a high-end industrial 3D printer out of the scrapheap. We'll also fawn over a pair of fantastically documented projects, learn about the fascinating origins of the lowly fire hydrant, and speculate wildly about the tidal wave of dead solar panels looming menacingly in the distance.
    Check out the show notes!

    • 1 hr 11 min
    Microscopes, Telescopes, Telephonoscopes, and a Keyboardoscope?

    Microscopes, Telescopes, Telephonoscopes, and a Keyboardoscope?

    This week, Editor-in-Chief Elliot Williams and Assignments Editor Kristina Panos stood around talking like they weren't thousands of miles apart. And we mean that literally: Kristina just got an up/down desk, and it turns out that Elliot's had the exact same one for years.
    In between the hammerings on Kristina's house (she's getting new siding), we kick things off by drooling over the first images from the James Webb Space Telescope, and compare a few of them to the same shots from Hubble.
    We managed to save a bit of saliva for all the seriously swell keyboards and not-keyboards we saw throughout the Odd Inputs and Peculiar Peripherals contest, all of which are winners in our book.
    This week, we ask the tough questions, like why would someone who has never played guitar want to build one from scratch? We can only guess that the answer is simply, 'because l can'. As lazy as that reasoning may sound, this build is anything but.
    Later on, we'll ogle an ocean of PS/2 keyboards and their new owner's portable testing rig, complain about ASMR, and laugh about a giant nose that sneezes out sanitizer.
     
     

    • 46 min
    Freezing Warm Water, Hacking Lenses, Hearing Data, and Watching YouTube on a PET

    Freezing Warm Water, Hacking Lenses, Hearing Data, and Watching YouTube on a PET

    It's podcast time again, and this week Editor-in-Chief Elliot Williams sat down with Staff Writer Dan Maloney to review the best hacks on the planet, and a few from off. We'll find out how best to capture lightning, debate the merits of freezing water -- or ice cream -- when it's warm, and see if we can find out what R2D2 was really talking about with all those bleeps and bloops. Once we decode that, it'll be time to find out what Tom Nardi was up to while the boss was away with his hidden message in episode 174, and how analog-encoded digital data survives the podcast production and publication chain. But surely you can't watch a YouTube video on a Commodore PET, can you? As it turns out, that's not a problem, and neither apparently is 3D printing a new ear.
    Check out the show notes!
     

    • 1 hr 3 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
44 Ratings

44 Ratings

Wheelbarrow of melons ,

,

It’s a great show which says exactly what’s on HACKADAY.com pretty much

MathewSomers ,

Smart and funny!

I've listened to these guys for years now, and their work hasn't gone unnoticed.
This podcast is really well done, smart, clever, and funny.
I hope my review helps to promote their podcast and brings in new listeners.
Mat Somers
Ponte Vedra Beach Florida, USA

gloomtuesday ,

so good

absolutely fantastic and enrapturing to a compsci major like me who’s trying to get into hardware hacking. everything is just enough over my head to reach up and grab it—aka perfect.

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