7 episodes

Hello, Nature host, Misha Euceph, didn’t know about the national parks until she turned 21. But after an experience in Joshua Tree and watching 12 hours of a national parks documentary, she sets out on a road trip to answer the question: if the parks are public, aren’t they supposed to be for everyone? In this podcast, she goes out to see America to tell a new story of our national parks.

Hello, Nature Dustlight Productions, REI Co-op Studios

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.1 • 159 Ratings

Hello, Nature host, Misha Euceph, didn’t know about the national parks until she turned 21. But after an experience in Joshua Tree and watching 12 hours of a national parks documentary, she sets out on a road trip to answer the question: if the parks are public, aren’t they supposed to be for everyone? In this podcast, she goes out to see America to tell a new story of our national parks.

    Ep. 6: Hello, Mammoth Cave

    Ep. 6: Hello, Mammoth Cave

    In Mammoth Cave, Misha learns how important it is to bring what has been buried above ground.

    • 46 min
    Ep. 5: Hello, Yellowstone

    Ep. 5: Hello, Yellowstone

    In Yellowstone, Misha asks what it means to restore a place. She gets stuck in the snow, goes wolf watching and finds out that we almost lost wolves forever in the park, and how reintroducing them healed the ecosystem.

    • 42 min
    Ep. 4: Hello, Glacier

    Ep. 4: Hello, Glacier

    In Glacier, Misha learns about what it means to be indigenous to a place from Derek DesRosier, Tom Rodgers and David Treuer. She learns about the Blackfeet tribe and their experience with Glacier. Misha also talks to Vivian Wang about what it takes to become a park ranger, and how hard it can be for people of color.

    • 38 min
    Ep. 3: Hello, Big Bend

    Ep. 3: Hello, Big Bend

    In Big Bend National Park, Misha finds a scorpion, learns to see in the dark and tries hiking alone for the first time.

    • 43 min
    Ep. 2: Hello, Arches

    Ep. 2: Hello, Arches

    In Arches National Park, Misha uncovers the pain and the healing power of the land.

    • 36 min
    Ep. 1: Hello, Yosemite

    Ep. 1: Hello, Yosemite

    At Yosemite, Misha learns about the Chinese and Black history from rangers, Yenyen Chan and Shelton Johnson. She also overcomes one of her greatest fears.

    • 58 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
159 Ratings

159 Ratings

Carwills ,

♥️ Great listening experience! ♥️

I love this podcast and the way it places the experiences of people of color in the context of the great outdoors. I feel seen as a woman, as a black woman, as a black woman who grew up in an urban area, AND as a person who is just beginning to enjoy hiking and being outdoors at the age of 46 years old. This podcast has given me so much in terms of feeling like I belong in National Parks, all while being fun to listen to. Misha explores the great outdoors in similar ways as I do, with a combination of skepticism and admiration.

MK777 ,

Not what it claims to be

I love the national parks and was super excited to get into this podcast. One episode was enough to tell me that this is not a podcast about nature (even though nature is literally in the title). Nature is only the context for the podcasts true agenda. Aside from the oft occurrences of filthy language (which certainly means no podcast listening with small kids), there is a strong ideological agenda being pushed in the podcast. Certainly everyone has the right to differing political views and ideologies, so be honest about it REI, and don’t try to hide this under the guise of nature. For my part, since I don’t espouse the ideologies being pushed through this (not rally about nature) REI podcast, I have lost some respect for REI as my favorite outdoor outfitter. It appears they are more about forcing their worldview on me than doing what they actually exist for which is, I don’t know… outdoor recreation?

Wabygayle ,

Skip this trash

Misha freely travels a country, which has set aside its most beautiful natural landmarks for everyone (including her), on a once-in-a-lifetime trip that many can’t afford. All the while bashing white people and cursing her way through a pathetic diatribe of race based victimhood.

She completely, totally and utterly misses the point of this uniquely American exploration by viewing everything through a racial lense, and is shocked when she sees people of all shapes and colors actually working at these places.

This is not a podcast about the parks, rather ones naive take on racial victimhood. The true irony here are her attempts to bash the very history that allows her the present-day opportunity to even produce such trash.

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