7 episodes

Podcasts from the History Faculty. Today the University is one of the world's most encompassing centres for the study of history. The faculty has about a hundred permanent teaching staff, nearly twelve hundred undergraduates, and almost five hundred graduate students attracted from many countries. Historians also abound in other departments. At their service is the Bodleian library and its ancillaries, which count among the greatest of research collections.

History Faculty Oxford University

    • Courses

Podcasts from the History Faculty. Today the University is one of the world's most encompassing centres for the study of history. The faculty has about a hundred permanent teaching staff, nearly twelve hundred undergraduates, and almost five hundred graduate students attracted from many countries. Historians also abound in other departments. At their service is the Bodleian library and its ancillaries, which count among the greatest of research collections.

    • video
    The Polish Italian Royal Wedding of 1518: Dynasty, Memory & Language

    The Polish Italian Royal Wedding of 1518: Dynasty, Memory & Language

    Natalia Nowakowska (Tutor and Fellow in History, Somerville College and Principal Investigator 'The Jagiellonians Project') gives a talk for the History Faculty. In 1518, the Milanese Neapolitan princess Bona Sforza travelled to Krakow to marry King Sigismund I of Poland, in one of the most celebrated weddings seen in Renaissance Central Europe. The wedding is remembered today as bringing Italian food and culture to Poland. However, this lecture marking the 500th anniversary of the wedding, explores how it also generated new kinds of political ideas and language. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 53 min
    • video
    The Materiality of the Divine: Aniconism, Iconoclasm, Iconography

    The Materiality of the Divine: Aniconism, Iconoclasm, Iconography

    Professor Salvatore Settis, an archaeologist and art historian, presents a special lecture on the The Materiality of the Divine. Is the essence of the divine representable? Apparently, sharp border lines separate aniconic from iconic representations of gods; and nothing can be more opposed than iconography and iconoclasm. Yet, iconoclasm can be, and indeed was, conceived as an act of cult; its practices imply not only the power of images, but specific strategies of attention in the eye of beholders. Aniconism only makes sense within a wider context where iconic and/or narrative representations of divine entities are the norm. Religious iconographies focusing on death and rebirth allude not only to the story or myth they tell, but to the cultural practices of recollecting and indeed revitalising tradition in devotional activity such as ritual, prayer, and belief. The very status of ruins, as defined in late antiquity and the Middle Ages, can be described as a cultural formation that acts as a bridge between iconic and aniconic, meaning and destruction, iconoclasm and rebirth, “classical” and “renaissance”. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 1 hr 13 min
    • video
    1968 Then and Now

    1968 Then and Now

    Professor Robert Gildea, Lecturer in History in Oxford, gives the Eighth Oxford Historians' Alumni Lecture on his research on political activists in Europe in the 1960s and their experiences during this time. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 1 hr
    1968 Then and Now (Slides)

    1968 Then and Now (Slides)

    Professor Robert Gildea, Lecturer in History in Oxford, gives the Eighth Oxford Historians' Alumni Lecture on his research on political activists in Europe in the 1960s and their experiences during this time. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • video
    The Weird World of Seventies Britain

    The Weird World of Seventies Britain

    Dominic Sandbrook is a prolific writer of books on the recent history of Britain and America, as well as a regular columnist in BBC History magazine, the Evening Standard, the Telegraph and the Sunday Times. Here he addressesses OUHS on the Seventies, a topic for which he has gained fame through his controversial thesis of continuity and conformity in place of the traditional interpretation of a radical cultural revolution. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 31 min
    • video
    Votes for Women, Chastity for Men

    Votes for Women, Chastity for Men

    Robert Saunders gives a lecture on the Suffragette movement and the campaign for universal suffrage in Britain. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 59 min

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