19 episodes

With the writing of the Constitution in 1787, the framers set out a young nation’s highest ideals. And ever since, we’ve been fighting over it — what is in it and what was left out. At the heart of these arguments is the story of America.

As a follow-up to the popular Washington Post podcast “Presidential,” reporter Lillian Cunningham returns with this series exploring the Constitution and the people who framed and reframed it — revolutionaries, abolitionists, suffragists, teetotalers, protesters, justices, presidents – in the ongoing struggle to form a more perfect union across a vast and diverse land.

Constitutional The Washington Post

    • 4.7, 1.9K Ratings

With the writing of the Constitution in 1787, the framers set out a young nation’s highest ideals. And ever since, we’ve been fighting over it — what is in it and what was left out. At the heart of these arguments is the story of America.

As a follow-up to the popular Washington Post podcast “Presidential,” reporter Lillian Cunningham returns with this series exploring the Constitution and the people who framed and reframed it — revolutionaries, abolitionists, suffragists, teetotalers, protesters, justices, presidents – in the ongoing struggle to form a more perfect union across a vast and diverse land.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
1.9K Ratings

1.9K Ratings

wayfarer313 ,

First-rate

Fantastic stories about our rights and freedoms. The host is a thoughtful, empathetic storyteller who really builds a bond with the audience.

GiorgosTheodorakis ,

Vocal Fry

I’m very interested, but the sound of the narrator’s voice, the frequent vocal fry, makes it a chore to continue. Either male or female, the narrator whose voice fries turns off my musician’s ear. The vocal tradition is an aural tradition, and the quality of sound is intrinsic to the quality of the narrative experience. The pinched voice—male or female—detracts.
Sorry, I’m out.

Dusie B. ,

Hello

Very interesting and well researched. You put an enormous amount of information in a very brief time. The only reason I don’t give it 5 stars is the use of some idiomatic expressions that are common to this generation but maybe not to those of us older citizens. Maybe a bit more professional ??? I know, fussy, fussy lady. I’m the mom/grand mom who sends texts and letters back with corrected grammar and punctuation so don’t take my criticism too seriously.
I’m 80 yrs old and my father was born in 1892 so I’ve lived through much of our American history. Keep up your good work.

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by The Washington Post