135 episodes

Hey, we're Things Have Changed. We unpack stories about technology and the ever-changing digital economy. Specifically, the things that will matter in the coming years, and the things that have evolved from the past.

Things Have Changed Things Have Changed

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 38 Ratings

Hey, we're Things Have Changed. We unpack stories about technology and the ever-changing digital economy. Specifically, the things that will matter in the coming years, and the things that have evolved from the past.

    How This Robot Will Make Your Dinner - with Rajagopal Natarajan

    How This Robot Will Make Your Dinner - with Rajagopal Natarajan

    During the pandemic, the way you’ve eaten has likely changed. Either you ate out less, you cooked more, or you wholeheartedly embraced food delivery such as DoorDash, Deliveroo, Grab, Swiggy or Zomato based on where you live.
    The Food Service industry was worth over $900B in 2021 just in North America and it’s only getting bigger. It’s also changing.. you may have experienced it already - with all sorts of new experiences, like food delivery, home chefs, and even robot-made food!

    As robots become more and more complex, the tasks they’re able to complete is growing! Roomba’s can clean your house, mow your lawn, The Da Vinci robot by Intuitive aids in surgeries and we haven’t even touched on the scale of robotics in manufacturing industries.

    So what about a robot that makes you a meal?

    Today, on Things Have Changed, we chat with Rajagopal (Raja) Natarajan, CEO & Co-Founder of Xook, to talk about how his team are pioneering a different type of food experience which involves sophisticated robotics, software and some very delicious meals.

    One day soon, a robot will make you a salad. And it might just be a Xook machine 🤖
    Important Links:
    Xook WebsiteXook Raises $1.3 Million to Roll Out Robotic ‘Food Courts in a Box’ in The USHybrid workers will return to cafeterias with automated food delivery machinesRajagopal Natarajan LinkedinSupport the show

    • 45 min
    How Sustainable Data Centers Can Help Us Achieve Our Climate Goals - with Dr. Bharath Ramakrishnan

    How Sustainable Data Centers Can Help Us Achieve Our Climate Goals - with Dr. Bharath Ramakrishnan

    One of the highest consumers of electric power are data centers. According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), the data center industry, accounts for approximately 4% of global electricity consumption and 1% of global greenhouse gas emissions. 
    To top it off, the carbon dioxide emissions of data centers are comparable to that of the aviation industry.The data center industry is responsible for more greenhouse gases than commercial flights  🤯 

    And so the pressure is on for them to achieve net-zero emissions!

    The growing intensity of computing power as well as high performance demands has resulted in rapidly rising temperatures within data centres. More computing means more power, more power means more heat, more heat demands more cooling, and traditional air-cooling systems consume massive amounts of power which in turns contributes to the heating up of sites.

    So what can we do??

    Our guest today, Bharath is at the forefront of this exact problem and is working on some very exciting sustainable methods of reducing DC energy footprint to help us achieve our NetZero goals.

    Throughout this conversation with Bharath, Shikher and I learned so much about why Data Centers are starting to become an industry to watch. Although we’ve branded it as one of the most profitable businesses of the 21st century, we acknowledge that it’s also going to continue to take a toll on our environment.


    Researchers and engineers like Bharath are the people that are working to improve the way we use technology, so that it doesn’t have to be technology vs the environment. As a lover of technology, maybe you can start learning about these problems and help building the solutions for the future of data centers. We’re putting some links in the description to help you get started! And you heard him! Reach out if you’d like to know more!


    Until next time… Stay Curious!


    Helpful Links:
    The environmental footprint of data centers in the United StatesHow green data centers can cut your carbon footprintBharath Ramakrishnan LinkedinSupport the show

    • 31 min
    How Data Centers Are Guzzling up the World’s Electricity - with Dr. Bharath Ramakrishnan

    How Data Centers Are Guzzling up the World’s Electricity - with Dr. Bharath Ramakrishnan

    Whether you’re streaming "House of the Dragon" on HBO or just chatting with your friends on Whatsapp, both cause a chain reaction and use energy. Today nearly all the world's Internet traffic goes through data centers or DCs for short. and it all the crazy things we do on the internet from cloud computing, AI, self driving to streaming your favourite shows on Netflix.

    There are big costs to running these massive servers! These DCs, need a huuuuge amount of electricity to run their equipment and make the internet that we use possible. They also need a lot of it to keep the machines cool. 

    Research shows that DCs consume close to 1% of the worlds electricity consumption!If DCs were a country, it would be the 3rd biggest electricity consuming nation, just behind the 2 biggest economies today in the US & China! And that is staggering! All those memes you share with your friends is consuming so much energy.

    In this episode, we continue our cloud series conversations with Bharath Ramakrishnan, Senior Thermal Engineer at Microsoft. Bharath understands the technology of data centers intimately and at the same time, is working to answer the question: “What’s the best way to keep Data Centers ‘Cool’?”


    Support the show

    • 38 min
    What Is Moore’s Law and Are We Coming to the End of It?

    What Is Moore’s Law and Are We Coming to the End of It?

    As of 2022, approximately 95% of organizations are using cloud computing for their work and nearly 85% of companies have deployed their workload on cloud in 2021. Furthermore, with the rising usage of internet and mobile phones & laptops, digitization is flourishing rapidly.

    Cloud computing is clearly here to stay.. and it's still growing.. but what drives the cloud in the physical space?

    To continuously expand the capabilities and the capacity of the cloud, we need to build data centers.. and to build data centers.. we need semiconductors. This has been the core technology enabling us to build the future of the cloud. The leading principle of the semiconductor technology can be traced back to the 1960's into the empirical observation of Gordon Moore.

    Anything exponential in this world is typically paired with something called "Moore's Law".. Founder of Intel forecasted that the number of components on a chip would double every two years, roughly. That prediction really defined the trajectory of technology as we know it today and it's been a huge growth driver of our economy. A few years ago, leading economists credited the information technology made possible by integrated circuits with a third of US productivity growth since 1974. But as we know in this show, things ALWAYS change and they have.

    In this episode, we explore the validity of Moore's law for the foreseeable future and we also speak with an expert in the space of preparing for that inevitable future, Bharath Ramakrishnan

    Here are some cool links to read up on:
    Why Liquid Cooling May Soon Be the Hottest Thing in Thermal ManagementCost-Efficient CoolingLiquid Cooling Options for Data CentersThe 5 Best Liquid Cooled Gaming PC in 2022Support the show

    • 19 min
    👋🏽 Hey It's Jed & Shikher.

    👋🏽 Hey It's Jed & Shikher.

    Hey THC Listeners! Jed has had a family emergency come up and had to fly to the Philippines to take care of family.
    As a result we at THC are taking a short break and we'll have an impressive lineup of  of guests for our awesome listeners when we're back. 

    So stay tuned, as you’ll be treated with an incredible pipeline, of ideas and conversation about the ever-changing digital economy right here starting October 25th.  
     Farewell for now but hey... stay curious!



    Support the show

    • 1 min
    Amazon AWS vs Microsoft Azure vs Google Cloud

    Amazon AWS vs Microsoft Azure vs Google Cloud

    It’s happening. AWS is no longer the only cloud heavyweight doing business with the US Government. Azure has recently signed a $10 Billion deal with the DoD.

    Gartner reports that AWS is still a better product than most competitors, in terms of what they offer and the quality! But some ask if it's fair that the DoD is only doing business with Amazon, a representation of perpetuating the monopoly Amazon is clinging onto. Amazon and Oracle both raised questions about “political interference”.

    Microsoft’s resurgence has been nothing short of extraordinary! With almost a year and a half of revenues more than 30% of AWS’, has Microsoft officially trumped Amazon in Cloud? And don't forget Google, the small fish in this race aggressively ramping up in high growth markets like India & South East Asia.

    If you’re curious about how the Cloud Wars are pitting the biggest tech companies against each other, tune in!

    Some helpful links:
    Monopoly to DuopolyAmazon LawsuitMicrosoft Come-Back with AzureBig Tech BattleGroundGovernments Erecting Borders for DataBattle for Cloud DominanceCloud MarketshareSupport the show

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
38 Ratings

38 Ratings

avisippingcoffee19 ,

Gaming Season was top notch!

Really liked the discussions in the latest season about gaming landscape. Looking forward to more of this!

Loespoes1234 ,

The best out there

Interesting topics covered in a fun way. I learn something new every week! Keep it up guys!

Seth B.. ,

Amazing podcast

It’s the bees knees

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