9 episodes

Some call it Hurricane Katrina. Some call it the Federal Flood. Others call it the day the levees broke. On August 29, 2005, the city of New Orleans was submerged. That story of hubris, incompetence, and nature's wrath is now etched into the national consciousness. But the people who lived through the flood and its aftermath have a different story to tell. A story of rumors, betrayal, and one of the most misunderstood events in American history. Hosted by Vann R. Newkirk II.

Floodlines The Atlantic

    • History
    • 4.8 • 1.9K Ratings

Some call it Hurricane Katrina. Some call it the Federal Flood. Others call it the day the levees broke. On August 29, 2005, the city of New Orleans was submerged. That story of hubris, incompetence, and nature's wrath is now etched into the national consciousness. But the people who lived through the flood and its aftermath have a different story to tell. A story of rumors, betrayal, and one of the most misunderstood events in American history. Hosted by Vann R. Newkirk II.

    The Wake

    The Wake

    Part VIII: Water, like history, repeats itself.

    • 54 min
    Destiny.

    Destiny.

    Part VII: People try to come home. But does home want them anymore?

    • 30 min
    Reckoning.

    Reckoning.

    Part VI: How could the levees have failed?

    • 36 min
    Exodus.

    Exodus.

    Part V: A hero arrives. But not the one everyone expected.

    • 30 min
    The Bridge

    The Bridge

    Part IV: Rumor becomes tragedy.

    • 25 min
    Through the Looking Glass

    Through the Looking Glass

    Part III: A universe of rumor and misinformation plays out on television.

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
1.9K Ratings

1.9K Ratings

Mommaksr ,

Absolutely Required Listening

Unique points of view beautifully tell a heart wrenching story; spewing facts that need to be brought to light. This podcast opened my (apparently blind, ridiculously white) eyes to the real story of what black people living in the heart of New Orleans during/after Katrina were forced to endure. Beat up, black and blue from Mother Nature only to be dealt the final blow by the state and federal government. Great listen.

sarai234326 ,

SKIP!! Bias and slanted and gets away from the point.

It started out fascinating but in the second episode the narrators bias and slant really took me out of the true events that were being discussed. By the third episode, I just couldn’t take the overwhelming bias anymore and the narrator beating the idea of government failure over and over like we couldn’t ascertain that on our own. The narrator treats us like idiots as he tries to sway the narrative constantly. I do believe the government did fail but I don’t believe it was intention just because thevictim were mostly people of color. But regardless how you believe, that can be determined by the listener themselves just by revealing the facts. JUST GIVE THE FACTS and let us come up with own determination. I feel like this podcast could have been really compelling but it ended up being a podcast that should have been named Hurricane Katrina for Dummies or America Is No Good in Any Way and Intentionally Tries to Harm Everyone. I turned it off and deleted it in episode 3.

bbnhnic ,

Great work

Cleared up so much misinformation on what was happening in New Orleans during Katrina. I love it

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