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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

    Babbage: Protein power

    Babbage: Protein power

    Google’s DeepMind has developed an artificial-intelligence system that can predict the three-dimensional shape of proteins. How will this monumental step-change for biology be used? Also, a new study shows how wearable devices could help doctors understand long covid. And how songbirds reacquired an ability lost by their dinosaur ancestors. Kenneth Cukier hosts 


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    • 27 min
    Alight in Tunisia: a democracy in crisis

    Alight in Tunisia: a democracy in crisis

    The president has sacked the prime minister and suspended parliament. It is clear that the country needed a shake-up in its hidebound politics—but is this the right way? A sprawling trial starting today involving the most senior Catholic-church official ever indicted is sure to cast light on the Vatican’s murky finances. And how climate change is already changing winemaking.
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    • 21 min
    The World Ahead: Let food be your medicine

    The World Ahead: Let food be your medicine

    As scientists learn more about the gut microbiome, what role could personalised nutrition play in the future of health care? We imagine a scenario where biohackers injected themselves with mRNA, the technology used in some coronavirus vaccines. And, could an artificial intelligence ever win the Nobel prize for medicine? Tom Standage hosts.
     
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    • 26 min
    The blonde leading: Britain’s two years under Boris Johnson

    The blonde leading: Britain’s two years under Boris Johnson

    As the country tests a bold reopening strategy in the face of the Delta variant, our political editor charitably characterises the prime minister’s tenure as a mixed bag. Hong Kong’s national-security law has now come for its universities, sending shudders through the territory’s last bastion of pro-democracy fervour. And why the alcohol-free beer industry is fizzing. 
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    • 22 min
    Editor’s Picks: July 26th 2021

    Editor’s Picks: July 26th 2021

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: adapting to climate change, academic freedom in Hong Kong (09:23), and monkey business (16:01) 
     
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    • 20 min
    Checks and Balance: Cuba libre?

    Checks and Balance: Cuba libre?

    The Biden administration has announced new sanctions against Cuba, as the communist regime cracks down on the biggest protests in decades. How might the president's pledge to support democracy around the world play out in Cuba? 


    Miami political consultant Fernand Amandi says liberating Cuba has political rewards. We look back at how Fidel Castro scored an early propaganda victory against America on a visit to New York. And technology writer Antonio García Martínez warns the rapid opening of Cuba to the internet will cause more disruption. 


    John Prideaux hosts with Roseann Lake and Jon Fasman.


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    • 41 min

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