205 episodes

The people behind The Intercept’s fearless reporting and incisive commentary discuss the crucial issues of our time: national security, civil liberties, foreign policy, and criminal justice. Plus interviews with artists, thinkers, and newsmakers who challenge our preconceptions about the world we live in.

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill The Intercept

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    • 4.7 • 5.7K Ratings

The people behind The Intercept’s fearless reporting and incisive commentary discuss the crucial issues of our time: national security, civil liberties, foreign policy, and criminal justice. Plus interviews with artists, thinkers, and newsmakers who challenge our preconceptions about the world we live in.

    No Accountability for War on Terror Atrocities

    No Accountability for War on Terror Atrocities

    The war on terror has killed nearly 1 million people and cost more than $8 trillion, according to a report by Brown University’s Costs of War Project. This week on Intercepted: Journalists Murtaza Hussain and Rozina Ali break down how the 9/11 attacks reshaped U.S. foreign and domestic policies. In the last two decades, the U.S. launched two wars, leading to millions dead and wounded. There was also a rise in unmanned drones killing innocent civilians, the use of widespread domestic and international surveillance, innocent people imprisoned, and perpetual human rights abuses and war crimes. And recently, there was a turning point in the war in Afghanistan, with the Taliban retaking the country. Hussain and Ali walk through the systematic failures across institutions — whether it be the government, military leadership, or the press — and the lack of accountability.
     
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    • 37 min
    The Long-Lasting Consequences of the War on Terror

    The Long-Lasting Consequences of the War on Terror

    The United States flew its last military flight out of Afghanistan, ending the 20-year war in the country — the longest in U.S. history. This week on Intercepted: Journalist Spencer Ackerman discusses his new book, "Reign of Terror: How the 9/11 Era Destabilized America and Produced Trump." In 2001, the George W. Bush administration used the 9/11 attacks to launch the war on terror — an era that led to two massive wars, countless lives lost, mass domestic surveillance, the rounding up of immigrants and people of color, a strengthened security state, drone assassinations, and human rights abuses. And it's far from over, says Ackerman.
     
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    • 45 min
    Afghans Try to Flee U.S.-Caused Crisis

    Afghans Try to Flee U.S.-Caused Crisis

    The Taliban have taken over Afghanistan, forcing the U.S.-backed Afghan government out. This week on Intercepted: Intercept reporter Murtaza Hussain guides us through how the two-decade-long U.S. War in Afghanistan has concluded. With the U.S. having suffered what appears to be a stunning defeat, national security editor for The Intercept Vanessa Gezari, who also reported from Afghanistan for years after the U.S. war began, breaks down the historical trajectory that led to this moment. In the weeks leading up to the Taliban takeover, lines at the country's only passport office grew longer as fears of instability and violence increased. Andrew Quilty, a photographer and journalist based in Kabul, talked to people at the passport office who were trying to leave. He later describes scenes from the country, only a day after it fell to the Taliban.
     
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    • 33 min
    EPA Whistleblowers Say Managers Bullied Them to Approve Dangerous Chemicals

    EPA Whistleblowers Say Managers Bullied Them to Approve Dangerous Chemicals

    Leaked audio reveals how chemicals hazardous to human health and the environment are fast-tracked and approved at the Environmental Protection Agency. This week on Intercepted, investigative journalist Sharon Lerner reports on how the chemical industry pressures the EPA to approve chemicals and pesticides that are dangerous to public health. Lerner speaks with whistleblowers from the agency, scientists who say their research has been manipulated by EPA managers to downplay the dangers of chemicals, including extreme cases that fall under the category of "hair on fire." Lerner also discusses how the agency has approved chemicals and pesticides — at the behest of companies — without proper research into their toxicity, or worse, even though scientists point to the chemicals’ dangers. But this is not new; it follows the long, historical trajectory of the EPA, including the “revolving door” between the agency and the chemical industry.
     
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    • 34 min
    American ISIS Offers a Firsthand Look Inside the Caliphate

    American ISIS Offers a Firsthand Look Inside the Caliphate

    For more than six months, The Intercept’s Trevor Aaronson communicated with Russell Dennison, an American man who traveled to Syria and joined the Islamic State. This week on Intercepted: Aaronson, an investigative reporter, discusses American ISIS, the newest Audible Original podcast documentary from The Intercept and Topic Studios, in which he chronicles the story of Russell Dennison, one of the first American citizens to join ISIS and fight with the group in Syria. Almost daily, Dennison communicated with Aaronson, sending him hours of audio chronicling his conversion to Islam, his turn to extremism, and his journey to Syria. Aaronson talks with Intercept reporter Murtaza Hussain about his reporting and what he learned from Dennison.
     
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    • 37 min
    Corporate Counterinsurgency Against Line 3 Pipeline Resistance

    Corporate Counterinsurgency Against Line 3 Pipeline Resistance

    Water protectors are traveling in growing numbers to stand with the Anishinaabe-led movement to stop the construction of Line 3, a tar sands oil pipeline.


    This week on Intercepted: Intercept reporter Alleen Brown takes us to northern Minnesota, a flashpoint in the fight to halt the expansion of the fossil fuel industry as the climate crisis deepens. Direct actions and other protests against Line 3 are just heating up and more than 500 people have already been arrested or issued citations. Opponents of the Line 3 pipeline are urging the Biden administration to intervene to stop construction, but his administration recently moved to defend the pipeline. Water protectors are being greeted by an intensifying police response and what scholars are calling a corporate counterinsurgency campaign led by the pipeline company, Enbridge.
     
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    • 41 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
5.7K Ratings

5.7K Ratings

midwestBlue ,

aug 18

Best and honest coverage with some of the best reporters reporting news we need to know. thank you!

Public Citizen number 5 ,

Can y’all at least delete “with Jeremy Scahill”?

Where’s Jeremy Scahill? Jack Disadoro is a producer, not a voice. Bring back the host please, or at least address where he went?

gold2.718 ,

Used to be my favorite podcast

Intercepted used to be the first podcast I would listen to whenever a new episode came out. However, it has devolved into Jack D’Isidoro’s personal play space and I cannot understand the speakers anymore. I have a hearing issue and the music he insists on playing over the speaker gets blended in so I cannot make out the words. I brought this basic access issue to his attention and he dismissed it by saying I should just read the transcripts. That is like telling someone in a wheelchair that instead of providing them a ramp, they should just go home and listen to a record. I love the interstitial music but let the speakers speak!

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