201 episodes

Go back to school with the country's top professors lecturing on a variety of topics in American history. New episodes posted every Saturday evening. From C-SPAN, the network that brings you "After Words" and "C-SPAN's The Weekly" podcasts.

Lectures in History C-SPAN

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    • 4.2 • 529 Ratings

Go back to school with the country's top professors lecturing on a variety of topics in American history. New episodes posted every Saturday evening. From C-SPAN, the network that brings you "After Words" and "C-SPAN's The Weekly" podcasts.

    Battling Nature in Korea and Vietnam

    Battling Nature in Korea and Vietnam

    Professor Lisa Brady talks about how chemical agents were used during the Korean and Vietnam wars to destroy the landscape and infrastructure. She argues that during this time the U.S. military began to see foreign landscapes as an enemy rather than an obstacle. She also describes the reasons for various defoliation missions as well as the long-term damage to both the environment and the locals. This class is from a course called “Environmental History of Modern War.”
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    • 1 hr 18 min
    Alexander Hamilton and the Early Republic

    Alexander Hamilton and the Early Republic

    Professor Elizabeth Cobbs Hoffman talks about Alexander Hamilton’s role in the creation of the federal government. She describes how, after the American Revolution, states operated as separate countries, which often caused problems. Alexander Hamilton, one of the authors of the Federalist Papers, argued during the Constitutional Convention for a strong central government to mediate between the states. This class was part of a course called “World History.”
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    • 56 min
    National Intelligence Under President Kennedy

    National Intelligence Under President Kennedy

    Catholic University professor and former CIA historian Nicholas Dujmovic teaches a class about national intelligence during President Kennedy’s administration. He talks about the Bay of Pigs, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and other covert operations during the Cold War. 
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    • 1 hr 11 min
    Economists Keynes, Hayek, and Friedman

    Economists Keynes, Hayek, and Friedman

    University of California Santa Barbara economics professor Lanny Ebenstein teaches a class comparing the work of John Maynard Keynes, Friedrich Hayek, and Milton Friedman.
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    • 54 min
    Slave Labor in 19th Century Virginia

    Slave Labor in 19th Century Virginia

    Stony Brook University president Maurie McInnis teaches a class about slave trade in Richmond, Virginia, and enslaved labor at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville.
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    • 1 hr 14 min
    American Military in the Revolutionary War

    American Military in the Revolutionary War

    Baylor University professor Julie Anne Sweet teaches a class on the American military during the Revolutionary War, including a look at the equipment and capabilities of both the Continental Army and militia troops.
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    • 1 hr 16 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
529 Ratings

529 Ratings

Yoyofox216 ,

Look into it more

I enjoy the show but keep in mind, most are only giving the official narrative.

Len Bussanich ,

Civil War Scholarship

There are certainly a lot of bad Civil War historians out there-Earl Hess and Mark Neely particularly-but Steven Woodworth is not too far behind. See his criticism in While God Is Marching On of one the best books ever written on the soldier experience and the horrors of combat during the war, Gerald Linderman’s Embattled Courage: The Experience of Combat in the American Civil War. Linderman’s thesis is also much more compelling and convincing than anything Civil War historian James McPherson has written on the soldier experience.

This Ken ,

To much a presentation of orthodoxy

I recently went back to college. What I discovered was the people who become professors are the people pleasers who are good a repeating back what ever they are told but not at thinking for themselves. Those who were a little rebellious went elsewhere other than academia. What we have created in our universities is an echo chamber where original thought is discouraged.

Unfortunately all the professors in this series that I have listened to so far begin from the same bias that clouds their ability to see the world as it really is. In order to understand the world we need more diversity of opinions where two or more sides of an issue are presented and over the long term the best ideas are likely to prevail. When all the professors think alike and are sure they have the correct view no new learning occurs.

As in any field there are a few exceptions. New truths generally begin as a fringe position and slowly are adopted. The producers of this podcast need to seek out those fringe professors at least occasionally.

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