104 episodes

A superlative guide to a great state’s destinations, hosted by Errol Laborde, Executive Editor of Louisiana Life Magazine.

Louisiana Insider Louisiana Insider

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9 • 18 Ratings

A superlative guide to a great state’s destinations, hosted by Errol Laborde, Executive Editor of Louisiana Life Magazine.

    Episode 104: Love That Chicken!

    Episode 104: Love That Chicken!

    You’ve heard the expression “love that chicken!” Well, you might like this colorful  interview as well. Al Copeland Jr , the CEO and chairman of the Copeland foundation, joins Louisiana Life Executive Editor Errol Laborde and podcast producer Kelly Massicot to tell stories from the new book, “Secrets of A Tastemaker: Al Copeland. The Cookbook. Recipes and Spicy Delicious Memories." His late dad founded the business best known as Popeyes, which is being honored this year on its 50th anniversary.

    Oh yes, we will also hear about Copeland’s famous standoff with vampire author Anne Rice.

    • 40 min
    Episode 103: Learning About Ourselves – What the Numbers Say

    Episode 103: Learning About Ourselves – What the Numbers Say

    Allison Plyer is an expert on numbers – not the boring kind that we may have experienced in school, but the fascinating statistics that reveal information about our lives and futures, as well as trends in the state. Plyer, the chief demographer for The Data Center,  joins Louisiana Life Executive Editor Errol Laborde, along with podcast producer Kelly Massicot for riveting revelations about people and places.

    Oh yes, we will also hear about the chief causes of stress among Louisianians. One of them may surprise you.

    Follow Plyer on Twitter @allisonplyer

    • 45 min
    Episode 102: Shrimp Boats are Coming

    Episode 102: Shrimp Boats are Coming

    Shrimp may be the most versatile of all seafoods. We crave the jumbo shrimp but small shrimp has a use in gumbo. We eat the crustacean fried, boiled, grilled or topped with a remoulade sauce. It is also an industry with its own unique issues and culture. Emma Lirette, author of the new book “Last Stand of the Louisiana Shrimpers,” joins Louisiana Life Executive Editor Errol Laborde, along with podcast producer Kelly Massicot to discuss what ties shrimpers to their boats and nets.

    Oh yes, we will also hear about the next generation of workers and will they stay on the bayou.

    • 28 min
    Episode 101: Looking for the Latest in Louisiana

    Episode 101: Looking for the Latest in Louisiana

    What’s new in Louisiana? That's a question that Louisiana Life magazine asks in every issue but especially its annual cover story entitled "La Nouvelle Louisiane." The magazine’s editorial staff probes the state to discover what’s new in many topics including architecture, visitor attractions, outdoor spaces, hotels bars, musicians and restaurants. Melanie Warner Spencer, the managing editor of Louisiana Life, joins the magazine's Executive Editor Errol Laborde, along with podcast producer Kelly Massicot to discuss great discoveries across the state.

    Oh yes, we will also hear what a Lake Charles casino and a New Orleans basilica have in common.

    • 56 min
    Episode 100: Russel Honoré, The General Who Took Charge

    Episode 100: Russel Honoré, The General Who Took Charge

    In 2005, during the days of confusion after Hurricane Katrina broke New Orleans’s levees, the military needed someone to take charge. That happened once Russel Honoré, a Louisiana-born General with lots of swagger, stepped off the helicopter. New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin would describe him as "that John Wayne type character." Honoré would be called again to defend a different city in 2021, after the January 6 assault on the U.S. Capitol. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi asked the general to conduct a security analysis. Honoré joins Errol Laborde, executive editor of Louisiana Life, along with podcast producer Kelly Massicot to discuss his battlefield career and his latest battle for equitable energy policies.

    Oh yes, we will also talk about his Green Army and how to go to battle.

    • 54 min
    Episode 99: Angela Gregory - A Woman Who Turned Stone Into Art

    Episode 99: Angela Gregory - A Woman Who Turned Stone Into Art

    Angela Gregory was one of Louisiana’s greatest artists and among the least known. She is distinguished for having chiseled a reputation in a field long dominated by men – sculpturing. From the streets of turn-of-the-century New Orleans, where she grew up, to the Parisian studio where she honed her craft, Angela Gregory’s story is that of a woman before her time. Beginning with her interest in art at an early age, a film produced for Louisiana Publish Broadcasting explores Gregory’s studies at Newcomb College in New Orleans and at the studio of Auguste Rodin’s chief sculptor Antoine Bourdelle in Paris.

    “At a time when women struggled to be taken seriously, Gregory married her mathematics skills with her love for art and architecture to create beauty in what she called ‘the ultimate lasting pieces of art," said Dorothy Kendrick, the film’s producer and writer, .

    Kendrick, along with art historians Susan Hymel and Elizabeth Weinstein, join Louisiana Life Executive Editor Errol Laborde and podcast producer Kelly Massicot to talk about Gregory’s career.

    Oh yes, we will also hear about an exhibit and a documentary created to tell more of her story.

    • 38 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
18 Ratings

18 Ratings

Cordesk ,

Listening from Texas!

Thank you!!!!! Best way to handle my homesickness during covid.

Syd009 ,

Hosts need to do their research

The hosts need to vet their guests before they invite them onto the show. Their most recent episode spread a popular myth about free women of color in New Orleans: The Quadroon Balls. These balls did not happen in New Orleans, and this myth has been disproven by several prominent New Orleans historians. While placage does have historical roots via Haitian refugees to the city after The Haitian Revolution, Placage was not a popular practice in New Orleans by free women of color. This myth is damaging and reeks of racism and its intersections with sexism aka misogynoir. Don’t spread false damaging narratives.

mccoyca20 ,

So inspirational

I don’t want our historic culture lost to next gen.

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