100 episodes

Monday-Friday from noon-1:00, Tom Hall and his guests are talking about what's on your mind, and what matters most to Marylander's, the latest news, local and national politics, education and the environment, popular culture and the arts, sports and science, race and religion, movies and medicine. We welcome your questions and comments. E-mail us at midday@wypr.org

Midday WYPR

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9 • 19 Ratings

Monday-Friday from noon-1:00, Tom Hall and his guests are talking about what's on your mind, and what matters most to Marylander's, the latest news, local and national politics, education and the environment, popular culture and the arts, sports and science, race and religion, movies and medicine. We welcome your questions and comments. E-mail us at midday@wypr.org

    Rousuck's Review: Everyman's Virtual 'An Almost Holy Picture"'

    Rousuck's Review: Everyman's Virtual 'An Almost Holy Picture"'

    It's time once again for a visit from Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck, who joins us today with her review of An Almost Holy Picture, the Pulitzer Prize-nominated 1995 play by Baltimore playwright Heather McDonald, which is getting a new virtual production by Baltimore's Everyman Theatre.

    Noah Himmelstein directs Everyman's resident company star, Bruce Randolph Nelson, in this reflective one-man drama about confronting challenges to our spiritual faith. The production's set design is by Page Hathaway, costumes are by David Burdick, lighting is by Harold F. Burgess, and sound design is by Megumi Katayama.

    Everyman Theatre's An Almost Holy Picture will be streaming for ticketed patrons until August 22nd. For information and tickets, follow the theater links above.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 9 min
    'Wild Creations': Hilton Carter's DIY Guide For Bringing Nature Indoors

    'Wild Creations': Hilton Carter's DIY Guide For Bringing Nature Indoors

    During the year and a half that Americans have been homebound by the COVID 19 pandemic, pet adoptions soared, and sales of houseplants have gone through the roof, increasing tenfold in some parts of the country.

    It makes sense: With unusually long stretches of time at home, many of us have discovered the simple joys of living things: be they four-legged, or placed in pots. Plants bring color and texture and sometimes sweet smells, and yes, occasionally, heartbreak.

    Newly christened plant lovers have any number of “houseplant savants” available to offer guidance and inspiration. Lots of green-thumbed entrepreneurs have taken to social media to teach folks how to care for their plants.

    One of the most successful of these plant influencers is my first guest today, Hilton Carter, a Baltimore-based filmmaker, editor and fine artist.His Baltimore apartment is filled with more than 200 plants. He shares his art and his knowledge of plant care and styling on his Website-store, ThingsbyHC.com, and with his more than half a million Instagram followers @hiltoncarter

    He’s currently hosting house plant workshops on the new online Magnolia Network. Target stores recently featured Hilton Carter’s Signature Collection of artfully designed houseplant fixtures and accessories, and he’s just published his third book on house plant design. It’s called Wild Creations: Inspiring Projects to Create, Plus Plant Care Tips & Styling Ideas For Your Own Wild Interior.

    Hilton Carter joins us today on Zoom...

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 40 min
    'LifeLines': Public Health Advocate Dr. Leana Wen's Unique Journey

    'LifeLines': Public Health Advocate Dr. Leana Wen's Unique Journey

    Tom's guest today is Dr. Leana Wen, an emergency room physician who is the former Health Commissioner of Baltimore, a columnist for the Washington Post,a professor of public health at George Washington University, a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a medical analyst for CNN.

    She is also the co-author of a book called When Doctors Don’t Listen: How to Avoid Misdiagnoses and Unnecessary Tests, published in 2013.She joins Tom today to discuss her new book, a critically acclaimed, important and timely reflection on her life, her career, and the state of public health in America. It’s part memoir and part prescription for elevating and improving public health.

    Leana Wen has long been one of this country’s most imaginative and innovative thinkers about public health policy; this book demonstrates the ways in which her masterful grasp of the pressing issues in public health is informed by a host of challenging personal experiences, a searing intellect, and unyielding compassion. It’s called Lifelines: A Doctor’s Journey in the Fight for Public Health.

    We are grateful to Dr. Leana Wenfor having been such a wonderful friend of Midday for many years. She has shared her expertise and advice so generously and we are delighted to welcome her back to the show, via Skype, to talk about her new book.

    ***

    Dr. Wen and Tom Hall will talk more about the book this Thursday, Aug. 5th, beginning at 6:30pm, as part of the Enoch Pratt Library’s Writers Live series. WYPR is a media partner for this free, on-line event. For more info and to register, follow this link.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 49 min
    Newsmaker: MD Senator Ben Cardin

    Newsmaker: MD Senator Ben Cardin

    Tom's Newsmaker guest today is Maryland's senior US senator, Ben Cardin.

    Back in March, President Joe Biden had a big victory when Congress passed his enormous $2 trillion dollar American Rescue Plan. Since then, Democrats have suffered setbacks with legislation around voting rights and police reform.

    But Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has expressed confidence that an infrastructure bill can make it through, perhaps as early as this week. The White House and a bipartisan group of Senators spent months negotiating an infrastructure blueprint. The Senate was in session over the weekend, and an infrastructure bill, totaling about $550 billion dollars in new spending, was delivered to the floor last night.

    Schumer has now undertaken the complicated task of shepherding both the bi-partisan infrastructure package and another package which does not have any Republican support through the closely divided Congress. The second bill, a Democratic-only led effort, would fund massive increases for education, child care and climate programs.

    Sen. Ben Cardin will be with us for the hour on Zoom. We’ll take your calls and comments a little later in the broadcast.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 49 min
    Perspectives On Anti-Asian Bigotry: Facing Hate With Art And Science

    Perspectives On Anti-Asian Bigotry: Facing Hate With Art And Science

    It has been a week in which the Asian American community has been in the news for reasons both triumphant and sorrowful. Sunisa Lee, the 18 year old Hmong-American gymnast, won an Olympic gold medal yesterday in Tokyo. On Tuesday, the man who murdered eight people in metro-Atlanta spas was sentenced to four life terms in prison in four of those murders. Seven of his victims were women of Asian descent.

    Today on Midday, conversations about the continuing problem of anti-Asian racism. As of May, the group Stop Asian American Pacific Islander Hate had reported 6,600 incidents of anti-Asian racist acts in the last year, several of which have been captured on horrifying videos.

    Anti-Asian incidents have spiked during the pandemic, with prominent political leaders and media personalities disparaging China in particular as a malicious actor in the pandemic.

    According to a Gallup Poll released yesterday, just 46% of Americans are satisfied with the way Asian people are treated, a 14% drop from last year. Before 2016, Gallup found more than seven in 10 Americans were satisfied with the way society treated Asian people.

    Tom's first guests today are two artists who are co-founders and co-executive directors of the Baltimore Asian Pasifika Arts Collective (APAC), a nonprofit organization that uses art to advocate for representation of Asian Americans and Pacific Indigenous Americans and to build cross-community relationships.

    Catrece Ann Tipon is a photographer and choreographer who is also a nurse.

    Cori Dioquino is an actress and producer, the owner of the Dioquino Acting Studio here in Baltimore, and a force behind the brand campaign, Unapologetically Asian.

    Then, Tom speaks withDr. Charissa Cheah. She’s a developmental psychologist who studies immigrant families and their experience of discrimination and identity. Dr. Cheah is a professor of Psychology and an affiliate faculty member in the Asian Studies Department at the University of MD Baltimore County. She’s also the Director of the Culture, Child and Adolescent Development Lab at UMBC.

    In November of last year, Dr. Cheah and several colleagues published an article in the Journal of Pediatrics about anti-Chinese racism experienced by Chinese American families since the advent of the Coronavirus. That research continues.

    Dr. Charissa Cheah joins us on Zoom from her home in Ellicott City.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 49 min
    How Trump Lost The 2020 Election: Michael Bender's Inside Story

    How Trump Lost The 2020 Election: Michael Bender's Inside Story

    Donald Trump continues to cling to the fabrication that he won the 2020 election, and his embrace of this pernicious and outrageous lie has cost him nothing. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R, Calif.), thirsty to regain power, is shunning Liz Cheney (R, Wyo.) and Adam Kinzinger (R, Ill.) as “Pelosi Republicans,” a truly bizarre bit of oxymoronic branding by a Trump sycophant who wants Nancy Pelosi’s job. McCarthy has completely retreated from his original position faulting Trump for not acting more swiftly to quell the insurrection at the US Capitol in January. But Trump’s behavior is as consistent and predictable as it is disgusting.

    As Michael C. Bender reports in his new book, "Frankly, We Did Win This Election": The Inside Story of How Trump Lost, Trump went into election day being told by his staff that he would win, and he has not given up that fantasy since. He has, as some are wont to say, “doubled down” on his fictional claim, and he has remained oblivious to the harm his claim is causing to the very foundations of our democracy.

    Bender’s book is a page-turner best-seller that chronicles Trump’s losing effort in the 2020 campaign. Mr. Trump spent twice as much in 2020 than he did in his 2016 election effort, and he garnered 10 million more votes the second time around, more votes than any other candidate in history, except one: Joe Biden, who won the election by more than 7 million votes, and a solid majority in the electoral college.

    Michael Bender is the award-winning senior White House reporter for the Wall Street Journal. He has covered the former president since the 2016 election, and he is with us for the hour today to talk about his new book. Michael Bender joins us on our digital line from Washington, D.C..

    Mr. Bender will be reading from and discussing his book with his Wall Street Journal colleague Julie Bykowicz tonight (July 29) starting at 6pm on the Back Patio at The Ivy Bookshop, located at 5928 Falls Rd., Baltimore, MD 21209. For more information and to register for the free, one-night event, click here.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 48 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
19 Ratings

19 Ratings

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Great Source of Local News

Thank you, Tom and team, for covering local issues so well, especially during this covid-19 crisis, as well as around local elections. Your services are critical and much appreciated.

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Love the pod

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