248 episodes

Posptartum Depression is real. And it's only part of the story. We dig in to ALL of the stuff that no tells you about, but you NEED to know. Dr. Kat, Psychologist and specialist in perinatal mental health, interviews moms, dads, experts and advocates about how to cope, manage and recover from perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. We talk about postpartum depression, postpartum anxiety and SO MUCH MORE! We get real. We get honest. We put on our stigma crushing boots and address the realities of the transition to motherhood and parenthood. Learn about it before you find out about it the hard way! You don't have to suffer! www.momandmind.com

Mom and Mind Katayune Kaeni, Psy.D., PMH-C

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.8 • 171 Ratings

Posptartum Depression is real. And it's only part of the story. We dig in to ALL of the stuff that no tells you about, but you NEED to know. Dr. Kat, Psychologist and specialist in perinatal mental health, interviews moms, dads, experts and advocates about how to cope, manage and recover from perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. We talk about postpartum depression, postpartum anxiety and SO MUCH MORE! We get real. We get honest. We put on our stigma crushing boots and address the realities of the transition to motherhood and parenthood. Learn about it before you find out about it the hard way! You don't have to suffer! www.momandmind.com

    246: More Than: PPD Healing and Supporting Suffering Mothers

    246: More Than: PPD Healing and Supporting Suffering Mothers

    My guest today shares her story of pregnancy and postpartum where she experienced “the sampler platter” of issues. Her experiences were varied, and they amounted to more than just the classic PPD symptoms. Because she didn’t understand what was happening, she felt like she was a bad parent in every way even though she appeared to be doing “just fine.” Maybe you–or someone you know–can relate to Alison’s story. Join us to learn more in today’s episode!
    Alison Staiger is a licensed clinical social worker certified in perinatal mental health. She owns Highwire Therapy, a solo private practice serving clients in Illinois and Louisiana, specializing in full-spectrum reproductive mental health through a feminist lens. Her coaching practice, The Matriarchy, helps feminist mothers use rebellious anger and fierce care to lead their families and small businesses with pleasure, purpose, and personality. Alison shares her personal story, along with her perspective on American motherhood and why we need a new culture of care. 
    Show Highlights:

    Highlights of Alison’s story of unexpected motherhood around age 30

    How Alison worked through an eating disorder and several challenges that left her feeling disoriented during pregnancy

    How medical interventions furthered Alison’s belief that she wasn’t prepared for motherhood and led to an emergency C-section to give birth to her daughter

    How Alison had to prove that she was OK and handling everything while she was in panic mode on the inside and felt totally dysregulated

    How it took slow work with a therapist for Alison to believe that she was allowed to have self-compassion

    Why Alison had the realization with the 2016 election that she wanted to have more autonomy

    Why Alison felt like she wasn’t showing up as a mom and in her life like she wanted

    How things began to shift and change for Alison as she gained a new perspective on her feelings

    How Alison learned that rebellion and anger against society’s norms can be part of being a good mother

    How she learned that it was OK to be “anti-perfectionist” and question every voice she hears

    How Alison’s healing became the context for the work she does today to help other moms

    Why much of parenting is wrapped up in trauma responses–and we don’t even realize it

    How our societal structure systems of parenthood and perfectionism make it difficult for moms to ask for care and receive care 

    How Alison stresses to her clients the need to drop into their sense of identity as an internal reconnection

    How Alison offers support to families through her therapy private practice and coaching practice

    What Alison wants parents to know about becoming a new parent

    Resources:
    Connect with Alison: Therapy Website, Coaching Website, and Instagram
    Visit www.postpartum.net for resources!
    Visit www.postpartum.net/professionals/certificate-trainings/ for information on the grief course.  
    Visit my website, www.wellmindperinatal.com, for more information, resources, and courses you can take today!
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 49 min
    245: Postpartum in the Pandemic with Courtney Ginder

    245: Postpartum in the Pandemic with Courtney Ginder

    Our story comes from a postpartum depression survivor during the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s normal for parents to have worry and anxiety when sickness is raging all around them, and these feelings are exacerbated by any sort of mental health condition. My guest shares her experience–and success story–of finding the help she needed in the middle of the pandemic. Many people will resonate with her story, so tell a friend—and join us now to learn more!
    Courtney Ginder is a mom, wife, and a postpartum depression survivor. She became a mom in February 2020, and three weeks later is when the world shut down due to COVID. Courtney and her husband were first-time parents who were cut off from their support network as they rode out colic and silent reflux with their newborn daughter. Courtney feels lucky that she was able to get help for postpartum depression during the pandemic, and she has become a passionate advocate for perinatal mental health, making sure that no parent feels alone. She is a part-time social media and graphics specialist for Postpartum Support International, the Social Media Chair for the Indiana Chapter of PSI, and a Climb Leader for Climb out of the Darkness in Indianapolis. She writes a blog about postpartum depression recovery, parenting, and mood disorders at Beyond Postpartum Depression. 
    Show Highlights:

    How Courtney and her husband enjoyed about three weeks of normal parenthood before the pandemic shutdown of March 2020

    How colic and the “witching hours” set in for her baby

    Why Courtney tried to justify her early postpartum depression symptoms

    How Courtney felt like she was drowning with her daughter’s constant feeding schedule and demands

    How Courtney began thinking intrusive and irrational thoughts and blamed herself for her daughter’s difficulties with silent reflux, thrush, and colic

    How Courtney and her husband dealt with the baby’s constant crying

    How her husband insisted that she reach out for help 

    Why Courtney was devastated about not being able to have her six-week postpartum visit in person

    How Courtney admitted to her doctor that she had postpartum depression and needed help

    How things improved for Courtney’s mental health and her daughter’s physical issues

    The reality that someone can be suffering from postpartum depression while appearing perfectly normal to other people

    How Courtney became involved as an advocate who wanted to do more for struggling mothers

    How postpartum depression is misrepresented and misnamed in the media

    How Courtney’s advocacy work gives great meaning to the suffering she went through as a new mom


    Resources:
    Connect with Courtney and her resources: www.beyondpostpartumdepression.com, Instagram, Facebook, PSI Indiana Instagram, and Climb Out of the Darkness Instagram
    Visit www.postpartum.net for resources!
    Visit www.postpartum.net/professionals/certificate-trainings/ for information on the grief course.  
    Visit my website, www.wellmindperinatal.com, for more information, resources, and courses you can take today!
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 53 min
    244: Postpartum Depression and Anxiety's Impact and Healing Journey

    244: Postpartum Depression and Anxiety's Impact and Healing Journey

    Today’s story is from a mom who experienced postpartum depression, anxiety, OCD, and rage. Many of us have been through one or more of these symptoms, and it’s especially hard for mental health providers to acknowledge these conditions. Postpartum depression and anxiety can take you by surprise, even if you know what to look for in the symptoms. Join us to hear more from Rosalinda in today’s episode.
    Rosalinda Heider is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker who received her Bachelor’s in Social Work from West Texas A&M University in 2006 and Master’s degree from the Baylor University School of Social Work in 2008. She has spent the last 12 years working as a mental health and suicide prevention social worker for the Department of Veteran Affairs. In her motherhood experience, she became aware of the lack of support for new mothers who are struggling with mental health. After starting a postpartum support group for mothers in her community in 2017, she also began a virtual postpartum support group within the VA for female veterans. Rosalinda joins us to share her story and her message to those with postpartum struggles, that they can come out stronger than ever with the right type of support and treatment. 
    Show Highlights:

    An overview of Rosalinda’s story as a social worker and her first pregnancy with her daughter

    How the pregnancy and birth went well but there were a few feeding issues with her newborn

    How going dairy-free and chiropractic care helped the feeding/colic situation

    How Rosalinda began being tearful and emotional and thought it was normal, never realizing she was experiencing postpartum depression and anxiety

    Why Rosalinda saw her primary care doctor for a postpartum depression screening–and cried all the way through it

    Why a postpartum depression diagnosis brought a sense of relief to Rosalinda and a realization of how common her feelings are

    How she felt alone in her diagnosis until she found support in talking to other moms

    Why Rosalinda didn’t enjoy motherhood until her daughter was about 5-6 months old

    How therapy and medications helped with the depression, anxiety, and intrusive thoughts

    How a simple suggestion from her therapist helped Rosalinda get better sleep and combat anxiety

    Why Rosalinda started a support group for moms in 2017

    Why it’s therapeutic just to share your story and have it validated by others–knowing you are not alone in your experience

    How it took a couple of years for Rosalinda to feel normal again because she felt angry and frustrated so much of the time–and struggled to hold her marriage together

    How Rosalinda realized and felt shame over all the times she blamed her husband for their problems

    Why social media doesn’t give a true picture of what people are experiencing—and can make some moms feel even more isolated

    A glimpse into Rosalinda’s support group for moms


    Resources:
    Connect with Rosalinda: Postpartum Support of the Texas Panhandle 
    Visit www.postpartum.net for resources!
    Visit www.postpartum.net/professionals/certificate-trainings/ for information on the grief course.  
    Visit my website, www.wellmindperinatal.com, for more information, resources, and courses you can take today!
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 43 min
    243: Postpartum Anxiety and Coping with Congenital Birth Defects Diagnosis

    243: Postpartum Anxiety and Coping with Congenital Birth Defects Diagnosis

    Even though postpartum anxiety is common and carries less stigma than it once did, things escalate to a whole new level when a birth defect diagnosis enters the mix. The stress and anxiety of a mother, father, and caregivers are compounded when new parenthood involves caring for a baby with special needs, and these parents feel more alone than ever. My guest today shares her story to let other parents know they are not alone in their struggles. There is hope, there is help, and there are resources! Join us to learn more!
    Robin Giesen is a certified perinatal mental health therapist who experienced postpartum anxiety herself. That anxiety was further compounded by the news that her son had a rare birth defect. Robin explains what craniosynostosis is, and how her son’s condition impacted her anxiety. After that totally unexpected diagnosis with her firstborn, her second pregnancy brought the same diagnosis to her second son while in utero. She explains how she coped and why she is invested in helping other parents who are going through similar circumstances. Robin is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in Long Beach, CA. She is certified in perinatal mental health, leads a postpartum anxiety group at her practice, and is a Bringing Baby Home educator. Robin opens our eyes to the rarely-talked-about situation of how a birth defect and caring for a special needs child impact a mother’s mental health. 

    Show Highlights:

    How Robin’s well-controlled autoimmune disorder brought her worry and anxiety as she experienced her first pregnancy almost 11 years ago

    How an emergency C-section and a NICU stay complicated what she thought would be a normal labor and delivery

    How Robin began thinking that some harm would come to her baby if he wasn’t right beside her

    Why Robin started taking medication to “take the edge off” of her anxiety and intrusive thoughts

    How Robin noticed something strange about the shape of her son’s head, saw a pediatric eye doctor, and received the diagnosis of craniosynostosis

    Robin explains craniosynostosis and its impacts

    How Robin went through the unimaginable scenario of neurosurgery for her newborn son

    Why Robin felt guilt over her son’s diagnosis and anxiety in preparing for his surgery

    Why Robin is adamant with her clients today about coregulation and how it begins

    How Robin’s second pregnancy (through IVF) revealed that her unborn son also had craniosynostosis 

    How her second son was delivered via planned C-section with a totally different outcome—and no anxiety for Robin even though she faced another surgery for her baby

    Why Robin realizes that she should have done more than talk therapy after her first son’s birth

    How Robin helps support other moms facing similar situations with their children


    Resources:
    Find resources for craniosynostosis and other cranial issues:  Cranio Care Bears and Faces
    Connect with Robin:  Website, Facebook, and Instagram
    Visit www.postpartum.net for resources!
    Visit www.postpartum.net/professionals/certificate-trainings/ for information on the grief course.  
    Visit my website, www.wellmindperinatal.com, for more information, resources, and courses you can take today!
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 43 min
    242: The Value of Fathers and the Black Voice in Parenthood

    242: The Value of Fathers and the Black Voice in Parenthood

    I’m excited to introduce you to my guest, who is doing amazing work with fathers. His work is very important and very needed in today’s world, and he’s working to combat the negative stereotypes around uninvolved fathers. I met him recently at the Postpartum Support International conference, where he won an award for his work, and I knew we needed to hear more from him on the show. Join us!
    Reginald (Reg) Day is a Certified Lactation Consultant, creator of the Get At Me Dad podcast, fatherhood expert, and Southeast Michigan IBCLCs of Color. He is the co-facilitator of the Nature’s Playhouse Fatherhood support group and a community health worker. He has also co-facilitated a community-based birth and breastfeeding support group, “Meet, Nurse, Love,” where he has served by mentoring alongside fathers in supporting their birthing and breastfeeding partners. The married father of two children, who were both breastfed, has made it his mission to change the narrative of how fatherhood is viewed in BIPOC populations. Reg lives out his passion for people by serving as an associate pastor at his local church. He is a fatherhood and family advocate who believes that great communities begin with strong families. He makes his home in metro Detroit with his wife and two children.

    Show Highlights:

    How Reg came into the work he does today as a way to reframe his personal experiences around fatherhood

    How mental health issues carry a stigma in the Black community

    Why Reg felt unseen, unheard, and devalued as an expectant and new father 

    How therapy became the turning point for Reg, providing an outlet and a healthy way to deal with the stress of fatherhood

    Why Reg chose to use his experience to help others in changing and challenging the system

    Why the value of a father can never be underestimated

    How fathers can advocate for themselves in a system that isn’t listening to them

    What Reg’s platform, Get At Me Dad, is achieving in educating and supporting fathers

    What Reg does through his extremely rare role as a Black male lactation consultant 

    How Reg teaches fathers to recognize the signs of postpartum depression and anxiety

    Why Reg works to get more Black fathers involved to help save communities and bring others out of darkness

    How the stereotype of Black fathers doesn’t match up with the reality of Black fatherhood

    How Reg gets his message to the fathers who don’t think they need help and support

    What Reg wants Black fathers to know


    Resources:
    Connect with Reg: Email and Instagram and Podcast
    Visit www.postpartum.net for resources!
    Visit www.postpartum.net/professionals/certificate-trainings/ for information on the grief course.  
    Visit my website, www.wellmindperinatal.com, for more information, resources, and courses you can take today!




    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 45 min
    241: From Pregnancy Anxiety to Making Impactful Change for New Parents with Anne Wanlund

    241: From Pregnancy Anxiety to Making Impactful Change for New Parents with Anne Wanlund

    Even in our modern world, we still have progress to make in terms of education around pregnancy, motherhood, and maternal mental health. Education and information are key in keeping parents from feeling blindsided and helping them feel supported when issues arise. Out of her personal motherhood experience, my guest is making an impact in the world for today’s new mothers. Join us to learn more!
    Anne Wanlund is a new mom who has been working in maternal/child health for most of her career, primarily in East Africa. Besides her work in maternal and child nutrition, she has been active in other humanitarian work in various corners of the world. She’s with us to share her story of being caught off guard in trying to manage her anxiety and mood during her pregnancy and postpartum. Through her experiences, she realized there was a huge neglected part of maternal mental health of which she was not aware, so Anne decided to dedicate her life to this issue through Canopie, a social impact company focused on preventing and addressing common maternal mental health conditions. In this episode, she shares her work today and what she wishes other moms knew about maternal mental health. Like me, Anne desires for more parents to know about these conditions so they know what options they have and what help is available. 

    Show Highlights:

    How Anne came to the work she does today with nutrition programs for mothers and babies in East Africa and the US

    Highlights of Anne’s personal pregnancy experience in managing her anxiety

    How pregnant Anne was shamed by her doctor upon returning to the US from Rwanda

    How Anne felt much compassion for other moms and babies but didn’t allow herself the same compassion

    Why we don’t realize the distinction between those who are there to clinically assess and those who provide care

    How Anne realized that something wasn’t right in her pregnancy but never found the support she needed at the time

    How society pressures us into thinking we aren’t supposed to ask for help

    What Anne wishes every mom knew about motherhood and support

    What Anne wishes our society would do differently around maternal mental health

    A look at the work of Canopie to prevent isolation and offer support in motherhood


    Resources:
    Connect with Anne and Canopie:  LinkedIn and Canopie
    Visit www.postpartum.net for resources!
    Visit www.postpartum.net/professionals/certificate-trainings/ for information on the grief course.  
    Visit my website, www.wellmindperinatal.com, for more information, resources, and courses you can take today!
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 45 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
171 Ratings

171 Ratings

CGN0246 ,

Wise, helpful, and relatable

Dr. Kaeni is a true expert, and she hosts a fantastic podcast. I highly recommend Mom and Mind for anyone - clinicians, parents, etc - looking to learn more about postpartum and perinatal mood disorders and other mental health challenges.

TovaEast ,

Genuine and Real!

So many moms who I work with struggle with postpartum depression, anxiety, and overall lowered quality of life after becoming a mom. This podcast is SO helpful in bringing this to light, normalizing it, and bringing inspiration that improving the overall quality of life for mothers is possible!

LizBar31 ,

Postpartum anxiety

I’m a first time listener and I couldn’t explain to my husband the way I feel. The first episode I heard I felt understood I felt that I wasn’t alone that there’s other mom’s like me. I was able to share the podcast with my husband he understands the way I feel now. Thank you for this space you give to moms that are going thru a difficult time. We are trying we are warriors ♥️

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