89 episodes

Keep up with the latest scientific developments and breakthroughs in this award winning weekly podcast from the team at New Scientist, the world’s most popular weekly science and technology magazine. Each discussion centers around three of the most fascinating stories to hit the headlines each week. From technology, to space, health and the environment, we share all the information you need to keep pace.

New Scientist Weekly New Scientist

    • Science
    • 4.6 • 34 Ratings

Keep up with the latest scientific developments and breakthroughs in this award winning weekly podcast from the team at New Scientist, the world’s most popular weekly science and technology magazine. Each discussion centers around three of the most fascinating stories to hit the headlines each week. From technology, to space, health and the environment, we share all the information you need to keep pace.

    #89: Climate-ready food of the future; the biology of poverty; deepfake audio; mystery cosmic signal; Captain Kirk in space

    #89: Climate-ready food of the future; the biology of poverty; deepfake audio; mystery cosmic signal; Captain Kirk in space

    Breadfruit could help us weather the storm of climate change. The team hears how the tropical fruit is tough enough to survive Earth’s warming temperatures and could even replace staple crops like wheat in the future. The team finds out why children living below the poverty line experience a raft of health issues, as new research examines the mechanisms that are at play. They also explore a good old fashioned space mystery, after strange signals have been detected from an unknown object at the centre of our galaxy. And that’s not the only exciting space news - they also discuss Blue Origin’s latest passenger flight to space, featuring Star Trek legend William Shatner. They also share deepfake audio of Donald Trump, showcasing how accurate the technology has become, and why we should be concerned. And they share a fascinating new theory about how sea cucumbers are able to survive in extreme environments. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, Michael Le Page, Jason Murugesu and Chelsea Whyte. To read about these stories and much more, subscribe at newscientist.com/podcasts.

    • 21 min
    #88: Should climate activism go to extreme levels?; malaria vaccine; new drugs to treat covid; mission to the asteroid belt

    #88: Should climate activism go to extreme levels?; malaria vaccine; new drugs to treat covid; mission to the asteroid belt

    The team opens with the welcome news that after 37 years of development, the world’s first malaria vaccine has been approved. They then hear from Swedish author Andreas Malm, who argues that the climate movement needs to get more militant. He says the likes of Extinction Rebellion have 'peace-washed' historical accounts of protest movements, and, controversially, puts the case for escalating from mass civil disobedience to engage in property destruction. The fight against covid is picking up pace - the team unpacks a flurry of announcements about promising new treatments. They discuss the new UAE space mission launching in 2028 which plans to swing by Venus before heading to the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. They also share a roundup of the physics and chemistry Nobel prize winners, and find out how touch receptors in the skin are involved in social bonding and sexual desire. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet and Alice Klein. To read about these stories and much more, subscribe at newscientist.com/podcasts.

    • 27 min
    #87: Mini black holes impacting the moon; first CRISPR gene-edited food goes on sale; why leaves turn brown in autumn

    #87: Mini black holes impacting the moon; first CRISPR gene-edited food goes on sale; why leaves turn brown in autumn

    CRISPR gene-edited food has gone on sale commercially for the first time. The team finds out about this ‘super tomato’ which has been created by a startup in Japan. Have you ever wondered why leaves change colour in the autumn? The team discusses an evolutionary explanation suggesting that leaf colour is a signal. Following Greta Thunberg’s latest speech at the pre-COP26 event Youth4Climate, the team reflects on Germany’s recent election, which could be very positive for action on climate change. They also discover how mini-black holes may have created some of the moon’s craters, and they find out why humans don’t have tails. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet and Abby Beal. To read about these stories and much more, subscribe at newscientist.com/podcasts.

    • 27 min
    #86: The woman who couldn’t smell; solving the climate and biodiversity emergencies; China’s quantum of solace

    #86: The woman who couldn’t smell; solving the climate and biodiversity emergencies; China’s quantum of solace

    Imagine going your whole life without being able to smell - and then suddenly you can. The team tells the amazing story of a woman who first gained the ability to smell aged 24 - a case which has scientists baffled. Efforts to tackle the climate and biodiversity crises need to be unified. We hear from Nathalie Pettorelli of the Zoological Society of London, lead author of a new paper calling for a more joined up approach, with an emphasis on nature-based solutions. The team discusses the latest developments in quantum computing, including a city-wide quantum communications network in China that has been running for almost three years - showcasing how a future quantum internet might work. They also find out why cuttlefish are being compared to ancient Romans, and explore the reasons behind the UK’s winter fuel crisis. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet, Matt Sparkes and Alice Klein. To read about these stories and much more, subscribe at newscientist.com/podcasts.

    • 27 min
    #85: The violent frontline of climate change; bringing back the mammoth; another first for SpaceX

    #85: The violent frontline of climate change; bringing back the mammoth; another first for SpaceX

    In some parts of the world, taking a stand for the planet can be incredibly dangerous. This week we hear from Laura Furones, of the campaign group Global Witness, on the finding that 227 environment activists were murdered in 2020. She explains why this is happening and what needs to be done to protect these people. In de-extinction news, $15 million has been given to a team hoping to bring mammoths back to life. While exciting news for some, evolutionary biologist Tori Herridge discusses the ethical implications of creating mammoth-elephant hybrids. The team finds out the latest on the UK’s plans to vaccinate children, and whether the country is likely to face another lockdown. They also discuss the SpaceX Inspiration4 mission, and learn that cows are easier to potty train than toddlers. Your hosts on the pod are Rowan Hooper and Penny Sarchet. To read about these stories and much more, subscribe at newscientist.com/podcasts.

    • 31 min
    #84: Health benefits of male flatulence; cave dwellings on Mars; covid booster shots

    #84: Health benefits of male flatulence; cave dwellings on Mars; covid booster shots

    Great news for the more flatulent among us - breaking wind is a sign of good gut bacterial health. The team discusses a slightly unsavoury experiment in which men weighed their poos, stored them in freezers, and even had their farts measured… all in the name of science. The team also questions the wisdom of rolling out covid-19 booster jabs. Some countries are already gearing up to deliver dose number three, all while poorer populations struggle to get their hands on a first dose. Potential homes have been identified for Martians of the future - the team talks about the discovery of caves on Mars which could be turned into settlements for human explorers. They also discuss the news of a billionaire-funded lab that’s been set up with the aim of ‘curing’ the ageing process. And you even get to hear the words of a swearing duck which has learnt to say ‘you bloody fool’ - yeah, you read that right. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet and Alice Klein. To read about these stories and much more, subscribe at newscientist.com/podcasts.

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
34 Ratings

34 Ratings

JadeTLG ,

Informative!

We subscribe to the weekly New Scientist magazine as well. Enjoy listening to NS podcast while waiting for new issue!

sciencepyar ,

Good except one unnecessary host

Great content, Tiffany is annoying - annoying voice, annoying questions not sure why she is in the podcast

migueelgarciaa ,

it’s ok but

enough with the corona talk

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