27 episodes

SAPIR is a journal exploring the future of the American Jewish community and its intersection with cultural, social, and political issues. These podcasts are recordings of Zoom webinars we have held with our contributors (season numbers correlate with issue numbers). To find out more and join our next events live, visit www.sapirjournal.org.

SAPIR Conversations SAPIR: Ideas for a Thriving Jewish Future

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 5.0 • 18 Ratings

SAPIR is a journal exploring the future of the American Jewish community and its intersection with cultural, social, and political issues. These podcasts are recordings of Zoom webinars we have held with our contributors (season numbers correlate with issue numbers). To find out more and join our next events live, visit www.sapirjournal.org.

    S7E2: A Conversation with Prof. Joshua Katz and Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens

    S7E2: A Conversation with Prof. Joshua Katz and Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens

    In this episode, SAPIR Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens talks with Prof. Joshua Katz about his recent SAPIR article, The Culture of the Canceled

    • 58 min
    S7E1: A Conversation with Lionel Shriver and Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens

    S7E1: A Conversation with Lionel Shriver and Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens

    In this episode, SAPIR Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens talks with commentator and novelist Lionel Shriver about her recent SAPIR article, Are the Good Guys Winning the Culture War?

    • 59 min
    S6E4: A Conversation with Michael Sandel and Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens

    S6E4: A Conversation with Michael Sandel and Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens

    In this episode of SAPIR: Journal of Jewish Conversations, Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens invites Michael Sandel to discuss his article on the  Limits of Meritocracy

    • 1 hr 1 min
    S6E3: A Conversation with Anshel Pfeffer and Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens

    S6E3: A Conversation with Anshel Pfeffer and Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens

    In this episode of SAPIR: Journal of Jewish Conversations, Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens invites Anshel Pfeffer to discuss his article on Jewish Life in Wartime Ukraine.

    • 55 min
    S6E2: A Conversation with Shuki Taylor, Ben Jacobs, and Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens

    S6E2: A Conversation with Shuki Taylor, Ben Jacobs, and Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens

    In this episode of SAPIR: Journal of Jewish Conversations, Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens invites Shuki Taylor and Ben Jacobs to discuss Jewish Education.

    • 56 min
    S6E1: A Conversation with Bethany Mandel and Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens

    S6E1: A Conversation with Bethany Mandel and Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens

    In this episode of SAPIR: Journal of Jewish Conversations, Editor-in-Chief Bret Stephens invites Bethany Mandel to discuss her article on how Homeschooling Might Just Be Your Answer

    • 57 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
18 Ratings

18 Ratings

dennis.karpf ,

Dennis Karpf

Aspirational no doubt. However, conversation with Prof. Sandel failed to question the underlying assumptions of inequality and the alleged equity of similar outcome. Furthermore, Prof. Sandel simply adds gloss of grievance and resentment to the Marxist perspective of the only meaningful categories for humans are class, race and gender. All judgments flow from those categories. What a hollow life. Unfortunately, Prof. Sandel and Bret Stephens fail to address the fundamentals of Judaism and economics which directly contradict the essential socialist principles of material equity as the predominate measure of the good society and person. First, the claim of inequality of income and class during the last 40 years is false. The Gini Coefficient measuring inequality has in fact not changed. Resentment and hubris as claimed by Prof. Sandel resulting from inequality in truth result from human gratitude and responsibility, personally, communally, morally and G-dly. For a moral philosopher like Prof. Sandel to dismiss free will and effort is a fundamental error. 14 o/o remains the poorest category of wealth which has been stable throughout the last century. Interested readers should read the works of Thomas Sowell, the “Dignity of Difference” by R. Sacks, z’l and “The Myth of Inequality”, by Phil Gramm. Second, the conflation of material outcome to the value of each citizen directly contradicts halakah and marshava of Judaism. Rather, Judaism recognizes the inherent and equal value of each individual created in the image of G-d irrespective of different individual talent. Merit is measured multi-dimensionally by the right and goodness of each person seeking to fulfill her mission from G-d on earth personally, communally and G-dly. To deny such as Prof. Sandel argues is simply not Judaism. In this season of repentance and return, Prof. Sandel has forgotten the very basis for human flourishing under G-d and Torah at Sinai.

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