261 episodes

No Jargon, the Scholars Strategy Network’s monthly podcast, presents interviews with top university scholars on the politics, policy problems, and social issues facing the nation. Powerful research, intriguing perspectives -- and no jargon. Find show notes and plain-language research briefs on hundreds of topics at www.scholarsstrategynetwork.org/nojargon. New episodes released once a month.

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon The Scholars Strategy Network

    • Government
    • 4.7 • 207 Ratings

No Jargon, the Scholars Strategy Network’s monthly podcast, presents interviews with top university scholars on the politics, policy problems, and social issues facing the nation. Powerful research, intriguing perspectives -- and no jargon. Find show notes and plain-language research briefs on hundreds of topics at www.scholarsstrategynetwork.org/nojargon. New episodes released once a month.

    Avoiding a Cyber Catastrophe

    Avoiding a Cyber Catastrophe

    Gone are the days of file cabinets, wall calendars and phone books, as advances in technology have made storing information easier than ever. But given a slew of high-profile data breaches in recent years – both at governmental agencies and private companies – cybersecurity is quickly becoming one of the most pressing issues facing our country. How can our government better protect against increasingly sophisticated cyber attacks? And how might these data breaches impact the lives of everyday Americans? Professor Jeremy Straub answered these questions and more, emphasizing what needs to happen to prevent a truly catastrophic data breach – and what such a breach could mean for the world. 
    For more on this topic:
    Check out Jeremy Straub’s SSN brief: Cybersecurity Incidents Can Be Unwelcome Wakeup Calls for Unprepared Agencies.  
    Read his paper: Defining, Evaluating, Preparing for and Responding to a Cyber Pearl Harbor.

    • 27 min
    Prison Cell or Recovery Center?

    Prison Cell or Recovery Center?

    According to the CDC, more than 107,000 Americans died of drug overdoses in 2021. And a record-breaking 627 of those deaths occurred in the state of Maine. Substance use disorder is seen as a public health emergency by the medical community – but drug arrests continue to increase all over the country. In light of these developments, professor of political science Rob Glover, alongside his colleague Karyn Sporer (professor of sociology), set out to discover Mainers’ attitudes about current drug policy in their state and what reforms they favor. Professor Glover shared these eye-opening findings with us – as well as its policy implications. 
    For more on this topic:
    Check out Rob Glover and Karyn Sporer’s OpEd published in the Kennebec Journal: Maine Voters Want a New Approach on Drug Policy.
    Read an overview of their findings.

    • 32 min
    Midterm Trailblazers

    Midterm Trailblazers

    With the midterm elections around the corner, all eyes are on the record-breaking number of Black female candidates on the ballot. We spoke to professor of government Nadia E. Brown, who shared her research on what’s contributing to the rising numbers of Black women seeking office. During the conversation, Professor Brown explored what the combined identity of being Black and female means for those who enter into politics and ways in which prior political participation becomes a key motivator for them to run for office. 
     
    For more on this topic:
    Check out Nadia E. Brown’s book, Sisters in the Statehouse: Black Women and Legislative Decision Making.
    Read her paper, coauthored by Jamil Scott, Lorrie Frasure, and Dianne Pinderhughes: Destined to Run?: The Role of Political Participation on Black Women’s Decision to Run for Elected Office.
    Read her SSN brief: What’s Hair Got to Do With It? Black Women’s Bodies and the Traditional Look of Success in American Politics.

    • 28 min
    In Search of a Home

    In Search of a Home

    With rent prices and mortgage rates continuing to skyrocket, finding and keeping stable housing is getting increasingly challenging for many  Americans. But according to sociology professor Prentiss Dantzler, those challenges are amplified for members of marginalized groups, such as Black Americans. Professor Dantzler spoke to us about the ways racial discrimination persists in the housing market, despite laws - such as the Fair Housing Act of 1968 - that were put into place decades ago to prevent it. He emphasized that having a home should not be viewed as a privilege, but rather a human right, and offered policy solutions to help achieve that vision.  
    For more on this topic:
    Read Prentiss Dantzler’s paper, Making Our Way Home: Housing Policy, Racial Capitalism, and Reparations.
    Check out a paper written by two of his colleagues, Elizabeth Korver-Glenn and Junia Howell, mentioned in the episode: The Increasing Effect of Neighborhood Racial Composition on Housing Values, 1980-2015.

    • 28 min
    Falling Through the Social Safety Net

    Falling Through the Social Safety Net

    Millions of Americans are poor, food insecure, housing cost-burdened, or medically uninsured. This is where the U.S. social safety net comes in – with programs like Medicaid, food stamps, and unemployment insurance  – to catch their fall. But how many experience a smooth landing? And how can society provide tangible relief to those who miss the net entirely? We sought answers from professor of public policy Chris Howard, who broke down what’s included when we talk about the “social safety net” and proposed ways to mend the gaping holes. 
    For more on this topic:
    Check out Chris Howard’s new SSN brief: A Realistic Portrait of the Social Safety Net
    Pre-order his forthcoming book, Who Cares: The Social Safety Net in America

    • 30 min
    Supporting the Needs of Refugees

    Supporting the Needs of Refugees

    The U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan and the war in Ukraine have brought an increased number of refugees to America over the past year. Enter refugee resettlement agencies – organizations that provide food, shelter, and of course, job placement to newly arrived refugees. But according to sociologist Dr. Nicole Kreisberg, their current strategy of job placement is deeply flawed: prioritizing immediate yet low-wage work over long-term reliable employment. Kreisberg spoke to us about the harms of this strategy, and what needs to be done to truly support incoming refugees.
    For more on this topic:
    Check out Nicole Kreisberg’s SSN brief, co-written by Els de Graauw and Shannon Gleeson: Refugee Settlement Should Look Beyond First Job Placements
    Read her recent paper, also co-written by Els de Graauw and Shannon Gleeson: Explaining Refugee Employment Declines: Structural Shortcomings in Federal Resettlement Support

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
207 Ratings

207 Ratings

K.sardine ,

Amazing info & insightful speakers

Love to share this podcasts with my friends on what’s going on in U.S. policy. Every month a new episode is released that details a topic in plain language that’s interesting, up-to-date and super informative. Love listening to this + using it for school papers.

Nickname1792804 ,

Concise, Academic, Interesting, and Accessible

This is the type of podcast that appreciates thoughtfulness and bringing academic consideration without the jargon. I would suggest this podcast to anyone looking for an interdisciplinary podcast to social science without the language that can make most scholarly subjects inaccessible to everyone but the professional researcher. No Jargon simultaneously balances this with not talking down to their audience.

zpsmith ,

Easy listen, easy learning

What a great show! No Jargon consistently puts out episodes with researchers that are easy to understand, not overly complex, but boy do they teach you a thing or two. Definitely check them out if you want to dig a little deeper on some fascinating subjects, without getting caught up in the jargon or methodolgy that often make academia so inaccessible.

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