171 episodes

Race, inequality, and economics in the US and throughout the world from Glenn Loury, Professor of Economics at Brown University and Paulson Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute

glennloury.substack.com

The Glenn Show Glenn Loury

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9 • 1.8K Ratings

Race, inequality, and economics in the US and throughout the world from Glenn Loury, Professor of Economics at Brown University and Paulson Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute

glennloury.substack.com

    John McWhorter and James Beaman – A Peek Behind the Antiracist Curtain

    John McWhorter and James Beaman – A Peek Behind the Antiracist Curtain

    0:00 How the pandemic affected diversity in the theater
    10:24 James gets drawn into an “antiracist” meltdown during rehearsal
    21:08 James’s story of ostracism and Loving v. Virginia
    26:58 Juilliard students revolt
    39:19 A plea for mutual understanding in the theater
    47:57 A preview of things to come on The Glenn Show
    50:32 Glenn’s problem with “racial inequity”
    59:18 Getting through to “Donna”
    1:03:58 To speak your mind or to speak strategically?
    Recorded November 27, 2022

    Links and Readings
    James’s homepage
    Glenn and John’s conversation with Don Baton
    John’s NYT piece, “‘Racism’ Without Racists”
    Ronald Ferguson’s speech from Glenn’s festschrift



    This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit glennloury.substack.com/subscribe

    • 1 hr 11 min
    Kmele Foster, Robert Woodson, Shelby Steele & Reihan Salam – The Ethics of Black Identity

    Kmele Foster, Robert Woodson, Shelby Steele & Reihan Salam – The Ethics of Black Identity

    0:00 What does “black identity” mean?
    4:53 Why Bob left the Civil Rights Movement
    8:04 Shelby: Our problem today is freedom, not racism
    15:36 Glenn: We can’t afford to give up on black collective goals
    21:30 Why Shelby wouldn’t sign a letter of support for Clarence Thomas
    30:13 Would freeing ourselves from race mean sacrificing collective action?
    39:10 The tactical efficacy of racial identification
    44:32 The struggle for human freedom
    50:46 Can we take pride in group achievements past?
    1:02:22 Kmele: We have a too-narrow sense of diversity
    1:07:20 Glenn: “The future is assimilation”
    1:13:03 Concluding statements

    Links and Readings
    Kmele’s podcast, The Fifth Column
    The Woodson Center
    Glenn and Bob’s letter of support for Clarence Thomas
    Thomas Chatterton Williams’s book, Self-Portrait in Black and White: Family, Fatherhood, and Rethinking Race



    This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit glennloury.substack.com/subscribe

    • 1 hr 25 min
    John McWhorter – The Wake of the "Red Wave"

    John McWhorter – The Wake of the "Red Wave"

    0:00 Glenn’s culinary dilemma
    3:31 Why the Republican Party depresses John
    8:14 What’s the difference between Herschel Walker and John Fetterman?
    13:12 Glenn’s argument for voting Republican
    30:01 Woke theater’s “melodramatic agitprop”
    43:10 Kanye, Kyrie, and the Jews
    54:00 What’s “systemic,” “structural,” or “institutional” about racism?
    Recorded on November 13, 2022

    Links and Readings
    John’s NYT column, “Racism and Theater, Then and Now”
    Glenn and John’s conversation with orchestra conductor Don Baton
    Wilson Jeremiah Moses’s book, Afrotopia: The Roots of African American Popular History


    This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit glennloury.substack.com/subscribe

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Rob Montz – The Heterodox Docs of Rob Montz

    Rob Montz – The Heterodox Docs of Rob Montz

    My guest this week, filmmaker Rob Montz, is an unlikely figure: a libertarian-leaning Brown University graduate who loves ‘90s rap and produces politically inflected documentaries that push back against the orthodoxies of the mainstream media. Rob has featured me in several of his works, and so I thought it was time to return the favor and have him on TGS.
    I begin by asking Rob how someone with a Brown pedigree ends up interested in such un-Brown-like figures as Charles Murray, Roy Beck, and Scott Atlas. Rob traces out his path from Brown to the Cato Institute to starting his own company, Good Kid Productions. He talks about some of his work, including a forthcoming doc about James Blake and Kyle Rittenhouse and one defending Roland Fryer from Harvard’s spurious sexual harassment charges. We then discuss the niches we’ve created for ourselves outside of the mainstream. Rob asks whether there’s a place for younger figures who can follow in my footsteps by achieving legitimacy both within academia and as a critic of the pieties that govern academic and political life in the US. We then move on to what’s shaping up to be one of the most crucial questions of the next two years: Trump or DeSantis? And finally, I ask Rob about his abiding affection for rap.
    Rob is doing important work as a filmmaker, and I recommend that everyone check out his YouTube channel. I’ll certainly be keeping an eye on it to see what comes next.
    (Note: This conversation took place on September 20, 2022, before the latest set of controversies around Kanye West emerged.)
    This post is free and available to the public. To receive early access to TGS episodes, an ad-free podcast feed, Q&As, and other exclusive content and benefits, click below.
    Featured Content from City Journal
    Roland G. Fryer discusses affirmative action, why the current system doesn’t work, and suggests alternatives to the status quo.
    0:00 The appeals of immigration restrictionism
    16:52 The 2013 Ray Kelly incident at Brown University
    24:39 Rob’s forthcoming documentary about Jacob Blake and Kyle Rittenhouse
    36:29 The response to Rob’s Roland Fryer doc
    41:41 Why Rob and Glenn aren’t seeking the mainstream spotlight
    47:20 Is there a “next Glenn Loury”?
    55:10 Glenn’s course on race and policing be required?
    1:02:19 Rob’s position on Trump
    1:09:11 DeSantis vs. Trump
    1:15:22 Rob’s love of ‘90s rap
    Links and Readings
    Good Kid Productions on YouTube
    Rob’s interview with Roy Beck
    Ray Kelly getting heckled at Brown in 2013
    Rob’s interview with Jay Bhattacharya
    Rob’s mini-doc about Roland Fryer
    Roland Fryer’s education company, Reconstruction
    Roland Fryer’s other company, Equal Opportunity Ventures
    Dexter Filkins’s New Yorker piece on Ron DeSantis



    This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit glennloury.substack.com/subscribe

    • 1 hr 23 min
    John McWhorter – The Golden Age of Black Heterodoxy

    John McWhorter – The Golden Age of Black Heterodoxy

    I’m back with John McWhorter for the latest installment of our ongoing conversation. John hit some technical snags in the first ten minutes of the recording, so apologies if the beginning sounds a little jumpy. After that, things smooth out. On to the conversation.
    We begin by talking about my memoir, which is now, after years of false starts, humming along nicely. But the process has forced me to confront some very dark episodes from my past, and they don’t always cast me in the most flattering light. As I explain, I think that presenting this unvarnished account of my own actions is necessary, both in the service of truth and in building credibility. John says he’ll probably never write a memoir, but I believe that if he sat down to do it, people would be more receptive than he thinks they would. After a rant about the “lightweights” against whom John and I often find ourselves pitted in the public square, we consider that we and people like us are finally making some headway in the conversation about race. Our views are no longer so marginal, and we may even be in, as John says, a “golden age of black heterodoxy.” And speaking of heterodoxy, I recount my recent debate with Shelby Steele, Robert Woodson, and Kmele Foster on “the ethics of racial identity” (watch this space for more soon). We finish the episode with accounts of the strange case of Jessica Krug’s racial masquerade and Darrell Brooks’s pathetic defense in his murder trial.
    We get deep in this one. As always, I’m looking forward to your comments.
    This post is free and available to the public. To receive early access to TGS episodes, an ad-free podcast feed, Q&As, and other exclusive content and benefits, click below.
    Featured Content from the Manhattan Institute
    Reihan Salam argues Congress should fund innovative public–private partnerships now to prepare for a future pandemic. 
    0:00 Walking through the valley of the shadow of death
    5:20 Earning credibility through self-discrediting disclosure
    16:29 The lionization of the lightweights 
    21:09 The golden age of black heterodoxy
    26:01 The mainstreaming of Glenn and John
    37:36 Glenn’s debate with Shelby Steele, Robert Woodson, and Kmele Foster
    45:45 Are we ready to “get past race”?
    56:03 The strange case of Jessica Krug
    1:03:46 Darrell Brooks’s courtroom performance
    Links and Readings
    The announcement for 2022 Philip Merrill Award for Outstanding Contributions to Liberal Arts Education
    Kmele Foster’s podcast, The Fifth Column
    Darrell Brooks’ closing statement at his trial



    This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit glennloury.substack.com/subscribe

    • 1 hr 14 min
    A Tribute to John McWhorter

    A Tribute to John McWhorter

    As I mentioned at the start of our latest subscriber-only Q&A episode, John McWhorter recently received the 2022 Philip Merrill Award for Outstanding Contributions to Liberal Arts Education, bestowed by the American Council of Trustees and Alumni. According to the ACTA, the award honors “individuals who have made an extraordinary contribution to liberal arts education, core curricula, and the teaching of Western Civilization and American history.” Perhaps I’m biased, but I can think of no one who more richly deserves such recognition, and so I was proud to be asked to deliver some remarks in tribute to John at a ceremony, which I offer below. (I’ve also recorded an audio and video version for those who prefer to listen and watch. The audio is available now, video will uploaded tomorrow.)
    Next month will mark the fifteenth anniversary of my first recorded dialogue with John. Since that first episode, the two of us have experienced much. The beginnings and ends of marriages, the loss of loved ones, the birth of children and grandchildren, not to mention changes in political orientation and new career paths. Through all of that, John and I have kept talking to each other. I think those conversations are important for the reasons I state below. But equally important to me is the friendship that has allowed us, despite our differences, to keep the dialogue going. Without that bond, we may have been able to continue the conversation, but it would not have meant nearly as much to me as it does.
    This post is free and available to the public. To receive early access to TGS episodes, an ad-free podcast feed, Q&As, and other exclusive content and benefits, click below.
    There are things that don’t—or can’t—get said when we talk about race in most venues in America. Those who have followed the 15-year-long conversation on this topic that I have been undertaking with John at The Glenn Show know what I’m talking about, whether it’s crime in black communities or out-of-wedlock birthrates, academic underperformance or the unbearable intellectual lightness of anti-racism agitation. In academia, in mainstream publications and media outlets, and increasingly in K-12 classrooms, what I’ve called “the bias narrative” holds sway. Negative aspects of black life are attributed almost entirely to the nation’s history of racial oppression, which is said to begin in the early seventeenth century and to continue unabated to this day. We are said to be a bandit society built on genocidal plundering undertaken by unrepentant racists.
    That’s one story you could tell. And if that story were just one of many circulating through our national discourse, it wouldn’t be the worst thing. But this “bias narrative” has become not just one of many stories. It’s now the only story on newspaper opinion pages, in scholarly journals, and in educational materials disseminated throughout our schools. It’s the story told by the White House. It’s the story that ramifies out from the most elite precincts of our country and shapes ordinary conversations and relations between individuals. Its grip on so many areas of the public imagination has become so tight that anyone challenging it is viewed with suspicion and, often enough, outright contempt. If an alternate explanation for black underperformance is proffered, it’s not the explanation that gets challenged but the individual making it. For to challenge this narrative, ipso facto, proves that one is a racist, or a deplorable or, if the challenger is a black man, an Uncle Tom.
    This situation is intellectually infantile and morally bankrupt. How we talk and think about race has consequences that can be measured not just in dollars and cents but in stagnant lives and dead bodies. So, responding with ad hominem attacks to any account of our current predicament that is not rooted in bias isn’t merely unfortunate, it is actively damaging. The stakes are enormously high here and th

    • 8 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
1.8K Ratings

1.8K Ratings

Ia Wil ,

Iowa Dairyman

You two continue to be my North Star with your discussions of issues that I am powerless to enunciate. Your shared intellect, and yes, your levels of melatonin, allow the two of you to say things I may think, but certainly can’t say. I hope the two of you outlast me in this Earthly realm, because you two make me smarter

Jesan Sorrells - Podcast Host ,

Thank You Glenn and John

Hello All -

Though not politically aligned on most stuff with John, I have to give Glenn major kudos for providing a platform were complicated cultural issues with no easy answers can be debated, discussed, and debunked by reasonable people. This is a rarity in our polarized media landscape where clicks and downloads tend to drive content decisions. John McWhorter's thinking and writing is incisive and Glenn Loury's contributions round out every point. You all are probably thinking of doing a "spin-off" show in the future, and we'll keep an ear out here for it if you do. Thanks again.

Granny'sGirl ,

I love this show!

I love being a fly on the wall listening to Glenn and John converse. Glenn’s lovely wife also needs to share that recipe for collard greens with coconut milk! This southern woman is intrigued.

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