191 episodes

A monthly review of the arts and intellectual life. Interviews, poetry readings, musical criticism, and more.

newcriterion.com

The New Criterion The New Criterion

    • Arts
    • 4.8, 43 Ratings

A monthly review of the arts and intellectual life. Interviews, poetry readings, musical criticism, and more.

newcriterion.com

    Music for a While #26: Time, timelessness, etc.

    Music for a While #26: Time, timelessness, etc.

    Jay begins with some festive music: specifically, the “Festive Overture” of Shostakovich. He has a showtune: “Some Other Time.” He has an Aretha Franklin hit, about zoomin’. He has a spiritual: “Ain’t Got Time to Die.” Some French organ music. And more. He ends with Karel Ančerl, the great Czech conductor who endured horror and produced much beauty and brilliance.

    Tracks played:

    Shostakovich, “Festive Overture”
    Bernstein and Comden & Green, “Some Other Time,” from “On the Town”
    Aretha Franklin et al., “Who’s Zoomin’ Who?”
    Trad., “Ain’t Got Time to Die”
    Guilmant, March on a Theme by Handel
    Tchaikovsky, “Garland Waltz” from “Sleeping Beauty”
    Mahler, Symphony No. 9, final movement

    • 39 min
    James Panero on “the woman who saw the future.”

    James Panero on “the woman who saw the future.”

    James Panero, the Executive Editor of The New Criterion, reconsiders the Gilded Age author Anna Bowman Dodd and her uncanny predictions about the future.

    • 16 min
    Music for a While #25: Sons, daughters, and others

    Music for a While #25: Sons, daughters, and others

    Jay plays some music by a Bach son. There is also Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Saint-Saëns, and other composers. The episode ends with a tribute to Rosalind Elias, the late American mezzo-soprano: the thirteenth and last child of Lebanese immigrants.

    Tracks played:

    Bach, Carl Philipp Emanuel, Rondo II in C minor
    Saint-Saëns, “Aimons-nous”
    Beethoven, Sonata for Piano and Violin in G major, Op. 3, No. 3, final movement
    Hahn, “À Chloris”
    Dohnányi, Serenade in C
    Wolf, “Benedeit die sel’ge Mutter”
    Tchaikovsky, String Sextet in D minor, “Souvenir de Florence”
    Verdi, “Stride la vampa,” from “Il trovatore”

    • 42 min
    Roger Kimball introduces the May issue

    Roger Kimball introduces the May issue

    Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the May 2020 issue and reads from its opening pages.

    • 17 min
    Music for a While #24: Springtime, round two

    Music for a While #24: Springtime, round two

    Jay’s previous episode was devoted to music of spring. As he points out, it’s still spring—and there’s a lot of spring music out there. So he goes a second round. This round serves up Schubert, Mahler, Copland, Rodgers & Hammerstein, and more. A colorful, happy bouquet.

    Tracks played:

    Argento, “Spring”
    Schumann, “Spring” Symphony
    Mahler, “Frühlingsmorgen”
    Mahler, “Der Trunkene im Frühling,” from “Das Lied von der Erde”
    Copland, “Appalachian Spring”
    Schubert, “Frühlingsglaube”
    Duke, “April in Paris,” Count Basie and His Orchestra
    Rodgers & Hammerstein, “It Might As Well Be Spring”

    • 35 min
    James Panero on plagues, art & Venice

    James Panero on plagues, art & Venice

    James Panero, the Executive Editor of The New Criterion, discusses the long history of plagues and their relationship to the art of our Western tradition, especially in Venice.

    • 16 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
43 Ratings

43 Ratings

Miasarx ,

New to this podcast

Wonderful.

Dan the liberal ,

Music For a While - worthwhile

Jay does a great job putting together varied selections & genres. Really knowledgeable guy.

MotDav ,

Top notch

The best part is Music for a While which could stand on its own as a podcast. I also enjoy everything else but the aforementioned show is the standout here.

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