21 episodes

The Unfinished Print is a podcast focused on the makers and those associated with the art of Japanese woodblock printing or mokuhanga. It’s a deep dive into the artists, gallery owners, and collectors of this unique art form. Through interviews Andre Zadorozny, himself a printmaker and academic, will explore what the art of mokuhanga means to so many people.

The Unfinished Print Andre Zadorozny

    • Arts
    • 4.9 • 9 Ratings

The Unfinished Print is a podcast focused on the makers and those associated with the art of Japanese woodblock printing or mokuhanga. It’s a deep dive into the artists, gallery owners, and collectors of this unique art form. Through interviews Andre Zadorozny, himself a printmaker and academic, will explore what the art of mokuhanga means to so many people.

    Mara Cozzolino - Printmaker: You Really Improve With Time (Part 1)

    Mara Cozzolino - Printmaker: You Really Improve With Time (Part 1)

    Mara Cozzolino is one of the best and brightest mokuhanga printmakers working today. Her work delves into the silence and simple moments, sending us face to face with the solitude and beauty that only nature can bring us. On this first of two episodes dedicated to Mara’s work and journey, we speak on her early attempts at mokuhanga, what traveling and attending mokuhanga workshops around the world has done for her current work, and how she believes in the power of mokuhanga as an art form. 


    This episode of The Unfinished Print is dedicated to our friend, Tim Whyte.
    Please follow The Unfinished Print and my own print work on Instagram @popular_wheatprints, Twitter @unfinishedprint, or email me at theunfinishedprint@gmail.com
    Notes: notes may contain a hyperlink. Simply click on the highlighted word or phrase.
    Mara Cozzolino’s work can be found on her website, And on Instagram. Mara also takes care of the International Mokuhanga Conference Instagram page.
    shina - tilia japonica,  is a specific plywood harvested for its sustainability and versatility in mokuhanga. It is a soft wood great for colour blocks but limited in its ability to hold thin line work. McClain’s sells blocks, here.
    MI Lab - Mokuhanga Innovation Laboratory is located in Tōkyō. It is a place set up for learning mokuhanga. The artist-in-residence program, having been held since 2011 on Lake Kawaguchi near Mt. Fuji, is an application based program hosting international mokuhanga practitioners who are looking to move their work forward. More information can be found, here.
    hanshita - is the preliminary drawing or sketch pasted on your woodblock, for the key block, and subsequent blocks of a multi block colour print. One can use a printer and spray tack, or a more traditional method of drawing on the paper itself and pasting with rice glue. One can also draw onto the block themselves, or use a soft plastic acetate to transfer the kentō and key block to the other blocks. Skies the limit.
    Motoharu Asaka - is a master woodblock carver located in Tōkyō. His Instagram,  and FB page, and website are a few ways to see his work.
    David Bull - is well known around the world as a modern scholar and preserver of the Japanese woodblock print and it’s process. Mokuhankan, woodblock.com, Twitch, and his YouTube channel are a few ways to see his work and what he is currently doing.
    mica - a mineral which, when ground into a fine powder, has been used to add a sheen or shine to woodblock prints. David Bull demonstrates this, here.
    Woodlike Matsumura   - is a supplier of woodblock print equipment, tools, and information.
    Jinbōchō - is an area in Tōkyō predominantly known for its plentiful array of used bookstores. Some information regarding the area can be found, here.
    Yamada Shoten - is a woodblock print art gallery located in the above mentioned Jinbōchō area of Tōkyō. Here they sell and exhibit woodblock prints of all types. Their English website can be found, here.
    Laura Boswell - is a lithograph and mokuhanga printmaker based in England. A very talented and busy printmaker, Laura is constantly evolving her work, and creating some of the finest prints you can find. Her interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here. Her website can be found, here.
    Paul Furneaux - is an artist based in Edinburgh, Scotland. His work is a fabulous blend of colour and geometric shapes. By blending his mokuhanga, with other types of mediums such as chiné colle, etching, and even sculpture. Paul creates powerfully unique works. His website can be found, here.
    intaglio - a type of printmaking which uses etching into a copper plate (or other metals) and pressing the paper onto the etched grooves. A MoMA video can be found here, regarding this process.
    Katsushika Hokusai -  (1760-1849) is one of the most famous woodblock print designers and painters in history. More information can be found, here.
    Kitagawa Utamaro - (b. ? - d. 1806). A famou

    • 56 min
    Kevin Frances - Printmaker: The Strangeness Of The Everyday

    Kevin Frances - Printmaker: The Strangeness Of The Everyday

    One of the most interesting and intriguing mokuhanga printmakers working in the medium today, is Kevin Frances. Kevin lives in New York City and uses the everyday life of his space to make his prints. Combining sculpture, and photography in his mokuhanga Kevin Frances uses these different mediums to create some of the most compelling and fascinating woodblock prints I have ever seen. His attention to detail is amazing. In this episode of The Unfinished Print, we delve into Kevin’s mokuhanga, how he creates his projects, via tools and pigments, his philosophical approach and all with a sense of humour.
    Please follow The Unfinished Print and my own print work on Instagram @popular_wheatprints, Twitter @unfinishedprint, or email me at theunfinishedprint@gmail.com
    Notes: notes may contain a hyperlink. Simply click on the highlighted word or phrase.
    Any and all of Kevin’s works mentioned in this episode can be found on his website. Kevin’s interview and studio tour with the New Leaf Gallery can be found here. 
    Stella Ebner - printmaker and Associate Professor of Art and Design at SUNY, Purchase, NY
    Richard Serra - celebrated sculptor and artist from San Francisco. Serra uses steel, lead, stone, and other materials for his massive installations and sculptures.
    MDF - medium density fiberboard, used by artists for all types of art from oil painting to models.
    Arnold Berleant - is a scholar and academic focusing on philosophy, music, and the environment. He discusses many subject through the lens of aesthetics.
    George Adam’s Gallery - located in New York City, the George Adams Gallery provides a platform for new and emerging contemporary artists. You can read the galleries interview with Kevin Frances, for his 2020 show Superpositions, here. 
    2001 A Space Odyssey (1968) - is a science fiction film directed by Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999).
    Talas - is a conservation, archival, and bookbinding supply store based in Brooklyn, NY.
    Guerra Paint & Pigment - is an art supply store based in NYC with a wide assortment of pigments from powder to dispersions. Used by many mokuhanga printmakers.
    Daniel Heyman - is a painter and printmaker currently working as an assistant professor at the Rhode Island School of Design. Some of his most recent work can be found, here. 
    murasaki baren - is a specific style of baren unique to mokuhanga. It is generally cheaper than other baren. According to David Bull’s Encyclopedia of Woodblock Printmaking, this baren shouldn’t be used for fine and delicate work. But, if it’s all you have, then you’ll make it work. If you’re in the US, then McClains carries this baren, here.
    Yoonmi Nam - is an artist and mokuhanga printmaker originally from Seoul, South Korea. Her work is delicate and powerful.
    Richard Steiner - is an American printmaker who has made Kyōto, Japan his home for over forty years. Richard has been interviewed for The Unfinished Print, here. A huge proponent of the yuki baren, a ball bearing baren invented by printmaker Rei Yuki (1928-2003) this particular baren is a fine example of the ball bearing baren style. A video of Richard using the yuki baren can be found here. 
    Awagami Factory - a Japanese paper manufacturer popular with mokuhanga artists. Based in Tokushima, Shikoku, Japan.
    kentō - in mokuhanga one uses kentō, an “L” shaped corner cut and another flat cut to the right/center of the block. It, in essence, allows the paper to align with your carving, especially with multi block colour prints. But as Kevin described in his interview, there are various other ways to get proper registration, such as the positive and negative bolts, or a floating kentō, which is a piece of wood with your cut registration marks but used in conjunction with your block. These registration marks aren’t carved directly into your block.
    Kamisaka Sekka - (1866-1942) was a painter and woodblock printmaker. He was influenced and was a part of the Rinpa school of painti

    • 1 hr 11 min
    Benoit Varaillon - Printmaker: I Work As I Go

    Benoit Varaillon - Printmaker: I Work As I Go

    The art of the modern printmaker is universal. All over the world mokuhanga has reached people from all aspects of life. It touches a chord that is unique and powerful. On this episode of The Unfinished Print I speak to an artist who’s work does just that. Benoit Varaillon, also known as Beno Uki Ga, is a French mokuhanga printmaker who mixes the traditional and the modern; pieces that are full of colour, exciting, and interesting. When setting up this interview, Beno’s one request was to have a translator. You’re going to hear three voices on this episode, of Beno, myself, and his cousin Lucie Galinon who kindly agreed to help translate. I hope you enjoy this newest episode of The Unfinished Print.
    Please follow The Unfinished Print and my own print work on Instagram @popular_wheatprints, Twitter @unfinishedprint, or email me at theunfinishedprint@gmail.com
    Notes: notes may contain a hyperlink. Simply click on the highlighted word or phrase.
    Beno’s Instagram, and website. All prints mentioned in the episode can be found on wither Instagram or Beno’s website. 
    Edo Period prints - woodblock prints of the Edo Period (1603-1867) were predominantly of kabuki actors (Sharaku), and courtesans (Harunobu) beginning in the middle of the 18th century. The traditional system of production came into play when making ukiyo-e of this period, designer,  carver, printer, and publisher. Famous designers of the day were Hiroshige (1797-1858), Hokusai (1760-1849).
    Meiji Period prints - 1868-1912 This period of woodblock prints were rich in colour and in experimentation. Still using the traditional production system, the printing become more intense via larger formats, triptychs and subject matter from war to murder. Famous artists of the time were Kunichika (1835-1900), and Yoshitoshi (1839-1892).
    Ogata Gekkō (1859-1920) was a self taught designer of woodblock prints. His life began designing rickshaw’s and under the auspices of the Ogata family his career began to flourish. His style is said to favour ukiyo-e, with subjects raging from landscape, war (past and present), Japanese history, and nature. A great website of his work and history can be found here.
    Akira Kurosaki (1934-2019) - Japanese printmaker and scholar who developed the Disk Baren. His printmaking career and academic career go hand in hand as he always seemed to be creating his abstract and surreal works while working as a professor. Seeing his work in person is a must, as the vibrant and powerful colours of his pieces can only do justice in person. Some of his works can be found here, at the Azuma Gallery
    Shun Yamamoto - is a modern printmaker who has worked with artist Shinji Tsuchimochi making his “Ginza In The Rain” print using a laser engraved block and can be found here via Mokuhankan.
    David Bull - is a Canadian mokuhanga printmaker who has spent most of his life in Tōkyō. He is the owner of Mokuhankan of Asakusa in Tōkyō where he and his staff create woodblock prints. He teaches and educates people from all over the world via his Twitch live streams and YouTube videos.
    aizuri-e - a late Edo Period (1603-1867) type of printmaking where the woodblock print is predominantly in blue, or shades of the color blue. The blue colour was usually a Prussian Blue imported into Japan around 1790. artelino have a great description of Prussian Blue and aizuri-e, here.
    shōmenzuri - “front printing,” rubbing the print in reverse so as to get a polished look on the print, usually for patterns. 
    Bretagne, France - a peninsula in Western France, which contains old architecture, beauty for sea coasts,  nature walks, as well as a great art scene. More information can be found, here.
    shin-hanga  1915-1940 - a renaissance of the Japanese woodblock started by Shōzaburō Watanabe (1885-1962). He used the traditional methods and line of production from the Edo and Meiji Periods. Mixing western painting and traditional Japanese motifs, for these new

    • 40 min
    Maureen de Vries - Curator at Nihon no Hanga Gallery Amsterdam: We Like To Talk About Ideologies

    Maureen de Vries - Curator at Nihon no Hanga Gallery Amsterdam: We Like To Talk About Ideologies

    Up to this point for The Unfinished Print, the primary goal has been to share the lives and works of mokuhanga creatives, for those who want to understand how contemporary Japanese woodblock prints are made. While understanding contemporary mokuhanga is important I believe that one must also search the past histories of mokuhanga. History, how prints were made, sourced and produced in Japan will, I believe, help the contemporary mokuhanga artist understand their craft all the more. 
    In this episode of The Unfinished Print I speak to Maureen de Vries, co-curator of the Nihon no Hanga gallery in Amsterdam. A small boutique gallery which is the vision of Elise Wessels, a collector who’s passion for the Japanese print led her to create a place for people to see and be educated on mokuhanga. 
    Maureen and I speak on multiple ideas and concepts about modern Japanese prints, post Meiji Period (1868-1912), such as how these prints were viewed in Japanese and Western society. We do this via Nihon no Hanga’s exhibitions. We try to understand the ideas and concepts behind the production of woodblock prints in that era. We also speak esoterically about what it means to produce prints from history, what is considered an “original” print, as well as how people from the past and today view post-Meiji mokuhanga. I certainly hope when you listen to this episode you will be inspired to friendly debate, and realize that there can be a lot more involved when trying to understand mokuhanga. 

    Please follow The Unfinished Print and my own print work on Instagram @popular_wheatprints, Twitter @unfinishedprint, or email me at theunfinishedprint@gmail.com
    Notes: notes may contain a hyperlink. Simply click on the highlighted word or phrase.
    Nihon no Hanga - website 
    Itō Shinsui (1898-1972) - Nihon-ga, and woodblock print artist and designer who worked for print publisher Watanabe Shōzaburō (1885-1962). Shinsui designed some of our most famous shin hanga, or “new” prints of the early 20th century. One of my favorites is “Fragrance of a Bath” 1930.
    Hashiguchi Goyō (1880-1921) - a woodblock print designer who also worked, albeit shortly, with Shōzaburō. In his short life Goyō designed some of the most iconic woodblock prints ever made. “Kamisuki” 1920, and “Woman Applying Powder” 1918. 
    shin hanga/sōsaku hanga - on the surface shin hanga, the new print movement that began with Watanabe Shōzaburō and sōsaku hanga started by Kanae Yamamoto (1882-1946) couldn’t be more different. Whereas the shin hanga movement harked back to an idillic time  of ukiyo-e, sōsaku hanga looked to folk traditions and a more rustic aesthetic. Both can be considered “new” prints in my estimation as both began to present their products to a general population at a time when mokuhanga was on the decline.
    Kondō Kōichiro (1884-1962) - a painter who produced a small amount of woodblock prints. Produced a series of printed called Senryu Manga dedicated to the poetry of Kenkabo Inoue (1870-1934). For more info and to see his work check out the Artelino page.
    Koizumi Kishio (1893-1945) - from Shizuoka, Kishio was a sōsaku print artist. Although his work, such as “Girl Before a Mirror,” 1933, shows the aesthetic of shin hanga in my opinion, so talented was he. For more information, Scholten Japanese Art has a great write up on him with an image of the above print.
    Nihon no Hanga has a wonderful array of catalogues for sale on their website, here.  They are incredibly well done and very accessible scholastically. Every exhibit spoken about by Maureen in this episode can be found on their website.
    Junichirō Seki (1914-1988) - an accomplished sōsaku hanga printmaker , Seki travelled the world and his work was published in Oliver Statler’s groundbreaking work “Modern Japanese Prints,” 1956. For more info on Seki and a visual of his works Artelino does a great job, here.
    Onchi Kōshirō (1891-1955) - arguably

    • 1 hr 5 min
    Graham Scholes - Printmaker: Do/Undo

    Graham Scholes - Printmaker: Do/Undo

    The work of Canadian mokuhanga printmaker Graham Scholes is the work of an artist searching for history. His career has taken him across Canada, teaching, studying and creating his prints and water colours.  Graham has worked in various types of printmaking and art but it is mokuhanga which he seems to have found his voice.  In this episode of The Unfinished Print, Graham (accompanied with his wife Marnie) goes into his artist life, his relationship with printmaker Noboru Sawai, his various print series as well as his printmaking methods and philosophies. We also discover how history shapes an artist.  

    Please follow The Unfinished Print and my own print work on Instagram @popular_wheatprints, Twitter @unfinishedprint, or email me at theunfinishedprint@gmail.com
    Notes: notes may contain a hyperlink. Simply click on the highlighted word or phrase.
    Graham Scholes website and shop can be found here.
    Art Gallery Of Ontario is a big box art gallery located in the city of Toronto founded in 1900.
    Western Technical School is a high school located centrally in the city of Toronto and was founded in 1927 with a focus on machinery and robotics. 
    Font de libération du Québec (FLQ) was a neo-nationalist and separatist political group and terrorist organization which was highly active in the Canadian province of Québec from 1963-1971. For a good read on the subject, D’arcy Jenish’s book The Making of the October Crisis is worth a read.
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada is a city located in the Canadian province of Ontario with a long a rich history of First Nation and settler tradition and culture. The McLaren Art Centre which Graham discussed in the episode is located in Barrie.
    Vancouver Island is an island off the coast of Canada with a rich history of First Nations and settler culture.
    Watercolours and How is a book published by Graham Scholes describing the use of watercolours as an art form.
     
    Let There Be Light  is a book by Graham Scholes about his lighthouse woodblock prints.
     
    Noboru Sawai (1931-2016) - mokuhanga and printmaking teacher of Graham Scholes, an American/Japanese printmaker who spent 22 years in Calgary, Alberta at the University of Calgary. He studied printmaking with Tōshi Yoshida (1911-1995) in Japan. His studio, Sawai Atelier was established in Vancouver, BC in 1981.
     
    Kochi, is a prefecture located on Shikoku Island in Japan. It has a rich samurai history and tradition of paper making. Inochō paper making museum is located in Kochi.
     
    Takamatsu is a port city in Kagawa prefecture on Shikoku Island in Japan.


    shina (Tilia Japonica) is a Japanese plywood made for mokuhanga printmaking. 
     
    The West Coast Trail is a 75km trail for backpacking which follows the southwestern edge of Vancouver Island.


    gomazuri is a printmaking technique called sesame printing in English printed with water and pigment. 
     
    waterless lithography is a form of printmaking developed by Canadian printmaker Nik Semenoff using silicone, offset aluminum plates, toner, water-soluble pencils and heat. 


    dry point is drawing on copper plates with diamond or carbide tipped needles, inked then cleaned.  This process is in the intaglio family of printmaking.


    John Amoss is an American mokuhanga printmaker whose Appalachian Trail series is one of the greatest modern mokuhanga print series available today. He was interviewed by The Unfinished Print and can be found here. 


    Sybil Andrews (1898-1992) was a British modernist linocut printmaker, painter, and teacher who lived in British Columbia. Her works are lauded and highly collectable. 


    kappazuri are Japanese stencil prints by layering colour and form with stencils cut by the artist. Made famous by Yoshitoshi Mori (1898-1992). Mokuhanga printer and painter Paul Binnie also began his career with kappazuri. Ronin Gallery NY has a great blog post about kappazuri  here. 


    reduction printmaking, colloquially known as “suicide prin

    • 1 hr 8 min
    Jennifer Mack-Watkins - Printmaker: Our Life Evolves And Changes All The Time

    Jennifer Mack-Watkins - Printmaker: Our Life Evolves And Changes All The Time

    Jennifer Mack Watkins is making thought provoking and powerful work. Jennifer’s hard work and her unique approach to mokuhanga, screen printing,  and lithography has begun to pay off. Her current solo show, “Children Of The Sun,” has been written about in The New York Times, Essence, Vogue, and Bust. Along with her solo show at the Brattleboro Musuem and Art Center in Vermont, where she organized all of the events regarding her exhibition, she is also currently taking part in Womb of Violet 2 or Unraveled. Restructured. Revealed at the Trout Museum of Art in Appleton Wisconsin. It is a group show which recognizes how marginalized  peoples have been affected by society today. In this episode of the Unfinished Print I speak with Jennifer about her mokuhanga experiences, what she has learned from travelling to Japan, what mokuhanga brings to her life as an artist and the evolution of her work. 
    Please follow The Unfinished Print and my own print work on Instagram @popular_wheatprints, Twitter @unfinishedprint, or email me at theunfinishedprint@gmail.com
    Notes: notes may contain a hyperlink. Simply click on the highlighted word or phrase.
    Notes:
    Jennifer Mack-Watkins -  website Instagram 
    Morris Brown/Clark Atlanta 
    Power Grip - are beginner/middle range tool set which are easy to use and are perfect for all levels of carvers. This set is sold at Intaglio Printmaker in London.
    Tufts University 
    Pratt Institute 
    Lower East Side Printshop
    April Vollmer - a seasoned printmaker who wrote one of the standards in woodblock printmaking, Japanese Woodblock Print Workshop, sold wherever you buy your books. Her long and successful career as a teacher and a printmaker are unparalleled.
    MI Lab - (Mokuhanga Inovation Laboratory) at Lake Kawaguchi. It is a program dedicated to the art of mokuhanga and hosts artist in residence programs.
    Takuji Hamanaka - printmaker based in Brookly, NY. Uses bokashi,  a printmaking technique, predominately in his works. Unique and powerful. website Instagram
    Manhattan Graphics Center 
    Speedball - make printmaking tools for various styles of printmaking.
    McClains Printmaking supplies - the go to woodblock printmaking supply company in the US. 
    Guerra Paint and Pigments - located in NYC a wonderful place to get the colours for your prints. 
    Mt. Fuji/Yamanashi Prefecture tourist website.
    Female samurai existed in Japan. Called onna musha (女武者), these women warriors were associated with the ruling samurai of the time. I hate to say it, but Wikipedia has a good write up about these warriors as a start.
    Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839-1892) - was one of the greatest print designers of his time. Yoshitoshi’s works straddled the line of beautiful and horrific in many of his series. Famous in the West for his One Hundred Aspects Of The Moon, Yoshitoshi’s works are highly collectable. Some of his works are available to view at the Lavenberg Collection,  and Ukiyo-e.org.
    Studio Noize Podcast -  a podcast focusing on contemporary black artists. Jennifer Mack-Watkins’ episode can be found here. 
    Kremer Pigments - a NYC based pigment shop carrying all types of pigments, especially powdered pigments.
    E/AB Fair
    Agness Scott College
    Newark Public Library
    Jungle Press Editions 
    Katsutoshi Yuasa - printmaker who lives in Tokyo. Began the East Tokyo Mokuhanga Studio in 2017. Creates works that are without key blocks and with a lot of bright colour.
    Project For Empty Space -  “A nonprofit organization dedicated to creating safe and equitable spaces for audiences and artists alike.” This description is from their website, found here.
    risograph printing - is a method of printmaking using a digital printer. More info can be found here.
    opening and closing credit background music:  Zangetsu - from the album Japanese Shamisen released in the US by Lyirichord.

    © Popular Wheat Productions
    Disclaimer: Please do not reproduce or use anything from this podc

    • 50 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
9 Ratings

9 Ratings

Jimbo1818 ,

Excellent podcast!

I am very interested in Japanese woodblock printing. I have seen so much content relating to it online, but this podcast was refreshing, interesting, and I loved hearing the perspective from different artists that I had not heard a lot about before.

Top Podcasts In Arts

You Might Also Like