12 episodes

The past is never past. Every headline has a history. Join us every week as we go back in time to understand the present. These are stories you can feel and sounds you can see from the moments that shaped our world.

Throughline NPR

    • History
    • 4.6, 3.4K Ratings

The past is never past. Every headline has a history. Join us every week as we go back in time to understand the present. These are stories you can feel and sounds you can see from the moments that shaped our world.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
3.4K Ratings
3.4K Ratings
review1298768 ,

Had Potential, Losing Optimism

This show started out great, with in-depth analysis and a legitimate “throughline”. It felt well-researched and independently intellectual. The episode on Korea and most of the Conspiracy one reminded me of how Chomsky cuts to the reality of events and paints a fuller picture. Lately this show has become very corporate-liberal, painfully so, and the episodes have no “throughline”. The Nancy Pelosi episode was not insightful at all and didn’t analyze our male-dominated political culture in any way, just talked about how great Nancy was at fundraising with no analysis of that or what that means. The morphine and lightbulb episodes were equally dull, felt like 3 separate mini-stories rushed and smushed together for a deadline. Hopefully they get back to a focused thesis through these episodes instead of these loosely connected meanderings.

bahareh12idol ,

Informative

I’ve really enjoyed the podcast and learned a lot from every episode. So thank you to everyone who works hard on producing the show. I look forward to listening to every episode!

Rosunitiner ,

War of the World

Fascinating and easy to follow brief history on Sunni and Shia conflict.
I listen to other episodes. Initially, I felt the hosts talked down to the listener when telling story
The evolution of the hosts and the way they now present the episodes have made this one of my favorite podcasts. Well done.

Top Podcasts In History

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by NPR