127 episodes

A podcast about Asia, Asian America, and life during the Coronavirus pandemic, featuring Jay Caspian Kang, Tammy Kim, and Andy Liu.

goodbye.substack.com

Time To Say Goodbye Time To Say Goodbye

    • News
    • 4.8 • 298 Ratings

A podcast about Asia, Asian America, and life during the Coronavirus pandemic, featuring Jay Caspian Kang, Tammy Kim, and Andy Liu.

goodbye.substack.com

    American psychos, maternal supply chains, and a new-old leader in the Philippines

    American psychos, maternal supply chains, and a new-old leader in the Philippines

    Hello from Prague!

    Tammy tells us about her travels through Czech Republic, and Jay describes his favorite cioppino recipes. Then, a few items from the news:

    The US is experiencing a critical baby-formula shortage. We get into the political and economic factors behind this crisis; discuss the role of formula and the US’s regressive family leave policies; and dabble in a bit of libertarian pro-free trade contrarianism. Also, Andy recs a book, Lactivism by Courtney Jung, for the history and debate over formula vs. feeding + a segment comparing children strollers.

    Then we talk about the horrific shooting that took place in east Buffalo over the weekend. What is the history of “replacement theory,” can we do anything about these shootings, and how does this intersect with the Democrats’ recommitment to policing?

    Finally, Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. has won the Philippines presidential election, 36 years after his authoritarian father was exiled by a popular coup. We get into disinformation, historical whitewashing, US influence, dynastic families, and the false trade of authoritarianism for growth and stability. Scary times in the Philippines going forward.

    Thanks for listening and supporting the pod!

    Thanks for listening, and stay in touch via Substack, timetosaygoodbyepod@gmail.com, https://twitter.com/ttsgpod, and/or https://www.patreon.com/ttsgpod!

    This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit goodbye.substack.com/subscribe

    • 1 hr 14 min
    Judging the judges on abortion, with Kate Redburn

    Judging the judges on abortion, with Kate Redburn

    Hello from a million-person protest!

    We wish…

    This week, we speak with a brilliant friend of the pod, Kate Redburn, a lawyer and legal historian.

    Kate takes us through the leaked Supreme Court draft decision that would overturn Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey, and explains how decades of organizing and legal scheming by Christian conservatives got us to this point. They also predict how the expected ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization could affect the rights of people who use contraception, queer and trans people, and people of color—and exacerbate a chaotic interstate patchwork of abortion laws.

    Plus: the state of abortion rights today, judicial activism, weaknesses in the feminist movement, and the need for a mass mobilization to advance our collective well being.

    Thanks for listening, and stay in touch via Substack, timetosaygoodbyepod@gmail.com, https://twitter.com/ttsgpod, and/or https://www.patreon.com/ttsgpod!

    This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit goodbye.substack.com/subscribe

    The Wobblies and the end of Covid?

    The Wobblies and the end of Covid?

    Happy belated May Day!

    We celebrate international workers’ day by discussing a newly remastered version of the 1979 documentary The Wobblies (directed by Stewart Bird and Deborah Shaffer), now showing in theaters and online. We discuss the continuing relevance of the Industrial Workers of the World for today’s labor movements, its universalist vision (in contrast to that of the AFL), the role of the Pacific Northwest in labor history, and continuities in the organization of labor and business ever since. Plus: a controversy over the screening at Metrograph in New York.

    Then, we get back to the pod’s roots to talk about what’s next in the pandemic, in a United States that seems increasingly ready to get rid of all of its mandates. What do we make of data suggesting that even the vaccinated are at risk of dying? Are our pandemic responses doomed to be privatized and individualized?

    Thanks for listening, and get in touch via Substack, timetosaygoodbyepod@gmail.com, https://twitter.com/ttsgpod, and/or https://www.patreon.com/ttsgpod!

    This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit goodbye.substack.com/subscribe

    • 1 hr 21 min
    Our warring cultures + Elon / Shanghai lockdown

    Our warring cultures + Elon / Shanghai lockdown

    Hello from a reunited podsquad, each back in their natural habitat!

    This week, taking off from an essay by Jamelle Bouie, we discuss the right wing’s composite attack on queer educators and racial-justice curriculum as an attack on public goods. How should the Democrats—and the left—respond?

    Plus: notes on and from the lockdown in Shanghai and Elon Musk’s takeover of Twitter.

    Thanks for listening, and ping us via Substack, timetosaygoodbyepod@gmail.com, https://twitter.com/ttsgpod, and/or https://www.patreon.com/ttsgpod!

    This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit goodbye.substack.com/subscribe

    • 1 hr 9 min
    A strike against capital at Amazon

    A strike against capital at Amazon

    Hello from the Staten Island Ferry!

    This week, the podsquad reunites for all kinds of $$ talk. We begin with a chat —occasioned by a book prize Andy received — about how to balance leftist politics and theory in journalism and academia. Then, our main topic: the historic victory by Amazon Labor Union (ALU) at the JFK8 warehouse!

    We discuss Tammy’s reporting in The New Yorker, traditional/large versus small/independent unions, and the links between Amazon, the Democrats, and labor.

    How did the ALU do it? Is it okay for the left to make celebrities out of Chris Smalls and Derrick Palmer? How do multiracial, immigrant politics intersect with class politics? What’s the next step, both for Amazon and US labor in general?

    Also, we unpack Ohio politician Tim Ryan’s pathetic new “workers first” ad, which scapegoats China. (If you want to take action, check out the responses of Asian American Midwest Progressives and OPAWL.)

    Thanks to TTSG Discord member, Lance, and the NBA Dark Web channel for the new theme music :)

    Thanks for listening!

    Please get in touch via timetosaygoodbyepod@gmail.com or https://twitter.com/ttsgpod.

    And subscribe via Substack or https://www.patreon.com/ttsgpod.

    This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit goodbye.substack.com/subscribe

    • 1 hr 25 min
    Adolph Reed Jr: Jim Crow + race/class debates

    Adolph Reed Jr: Jim Crow + race/class debates

    Hi everyone:

    Today it’s just me, Andy, talking with guest Adolph Reed, Prof. Emeritus at University of Pennsylvania, about his new book The South: Jim Crow and its Afterlives. Drawing from personal experience, he argues that racial segregation cannot be fully explained through abstract ideas about white supremacy and anti-Blackness. It was a coherent social order animated by ruling class power. 

    We talk about what he calls “neoliberal race politics,” the charge against him of “class reductionism” (NYT), and the broader usefulness of this analysis to contexts across the US and the world. Also, a bit of NBA banter. 

    See: our conversation with Merlin Chowkwanyun (2020) on his work with Reed on racial disparity discourse (their piece on Covid reporting here)

    Also: Adolph’s new podcast Class Matters

    and Adolph’s essays on nonsite.org

    0:00: The premise of the book and its reception (The New Yorker, Common Dreams, Harper’s podcast). Adolph periodizes Jim Crow from the 1890s-1960s, and he speaks about his formative years in Louisiana, North Carolina, Arkansas, and Atlanta. He first drafted the book in the 2000s after realizing his would be the last generation with clear memories of the Jim Crow order. Jim Crow, he argues, has been conspicuously overlooked in contemporary discussions about race and slavery, which flatten history (“the bad old timey-times”).

    20:20: An aside on Adolph’s polemic (2013) on Hollywood “race movies” such as Django Unchained and The Help.

    28:30: Adolph describes the Jim Crow racial order as a practical and pragmatic strategy of class power over all workers, rather than an abstract hatred of one group. And why it is counterproductive to frame it as a binary story of all white versus all Black people.

     It’s not like white people had a meeting around the campfire and said, “let’s go put some Jim Crow on some Black people”

    36:30: Framing Jim Crow as unrelenting oppression in fact mirrors, ironically, the very vision laid out by segregationists themselves. This view, found today in liberal anti-racism discourses, attributes everything to an abstract “white supremacy” and “anti-Blackness.” Class is disavowed. The effect is to help sustain an elite stratum of racial spokespeople. But also, why does this race-first worldview have such broad appeal?

    53:15: Adolph responds to charges that his argument is class reductionist. We reference an older exchange with the late political theorist Ellen Meiskins Wood (2002) to clarify the distinctions in Adolph’s arguments (see the original text here, esp. the “Rejoinder”). Race, he argues, is one of many ideologies to sustain accumulation and class power that rest on “ascriptive differences,” or, putative ideas about the natural differences between people: if not race, then sex, gender, religion, caste, tribe, mental and physical abilities, etc. 

    Also see Adolph’s concise summary in New Labor Forum (2013).

    1:03:50: Wrestling with common objections, such as, “ethnocentrism predates capitalism, so race is autonomous from class”; or, “upper-class Black people are subject to police violence too, so class doesn’t explain racism.”

    1:14:20: Adolph on the broader generalizability of his analysis for other groups, in the US and globally (see Clare Kim on comparative analyses of Asian American/Black racial ideology). And where Adolph got his Marxism.

    I wouldn’t say I’m the most cosmopolitan world traveler. But the thing I will say is that, in every place that I’ve been, what I’ve noticed is that most people are scuffling trying to work for a living. It doesn’t matter what kind of food they eat or the music they listen to. I mean that’s all interesting, more or less. But the basic human condition is that, right?

    1:30:30: NBA banter.

    Thanks for listening! Please get in touch via timetosaygoodbyepod@gmail.com or https://twitter.com/ttsgpod

    You can subscribe via substack or https://www.patreo

    • 1 hr 38 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
298 Ratings

298 Ratings

______nikki________ ,

Love.

I have a dwindling list of enjoyments as of late, but this podcast is something I wait for and devour. It is incredible. Thank you

Fidelio#9 ,

Thoughts on the show:

I love Andy

jddddddan ,

good listen

Really enjoyed this podcast! Found it thru the squid game episode and really liked the debate/critiques.

Side note: I am not East Asian but I think the way Ali’s character was portrayed in the series highlighted how his class position + immigrant status enables others to continually exploit his labor and personhood.

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