219 episodes

Hosts Juliet Beauchamp and Ken Mingis talk with guests about the latest tech trends and news.

Today in Tech IDG

    • Technology
    • 4.2 • 6 Ratings

Hosts Juliet Beauchamp and Ken Mingis talk with guests about the latest tech trends and news.

    Apple introduces the A15-powered iPhone 13, plus iOS 14.8 patches Pegasus spyware flaw

    Apple introduces the A15-powered iPhone 13, plus iOS 14.8 patches Pegasus spyware flaw

    Apple announced its latest additions to its iPhone lineup, as well as a new iPad mini, at its "California Streaming" event on Tuesday. Both devices will be powered by Apple's new A15 Bionic processor. Macworld executive editor Michael Simon and Computerworld executive editor join Juliet to discuss how the A15 processor compare to its predecessor, the A14, and how Apple may use it in future products. They also cover what the iPhone 13 and iPad mini mean for the enterprise. Plus, Michael, Ken and Juliet discuss Apple's response to the Pegasus spyware flaw.

    • 38 min
    iPhone 13 announcement: What to expect at Apple's September 14 event

    iPhone 13 announcement: What to expect at Apple's September 14 event

    Apple's next event, titled "California Streaming," will occur on Tuesday, September 14 at 10 a.m. PT. It's expected that Apple will announce the iPhone 13, Apple Watch Series 7 and new set of AirPods. Potential new iPhone features include the ability to photograph stars at night, an always-on display and portrait mode videos. Macworld executive editor Michael Simon and Computerworld executive editor Ken Mingis join Juliet to discuss what rumored devices, software and features will be announced at the event. If you have any questions about Apple's September event, let us know in the comments. We'll respond during the live broadcast.

    • 35 min
    Windows 11 overview: Hardware requirements, security updates and upgrade confusion

    Windows 11 overview: Hardware requirements, security updates and upgrade confusion

    Microsoft will launch Windows 11 on October 5, but not every PC will be eligible for an immediate upgrade. Rollout will last well into 2022 for machines that meet the necessary hardware requirements, and Windows 10 will be supported through October 2025. But, there's still some confusion about what hardware is required to support Windows 11's beefed up security measures. Computerworld executive editor Ken Mingis and contributing editor Preston Gralla join Juliet to discuss Windows 11 security, whether it will require new hardware and what IT needs to know before upgrading. 

    • 27 min
    How the iPhone SE compares to the Pixel 5a

    How the iPhone SE compares to the Pixel 5a

    Google's latest addition to the Pixel lineup, the Pixel 5a, ships out today. While Apple also has a low(er) cost phone in the iPhone SE, the two smartphones don't have much in common. The Pixel 5a comes with 5G capability, an OLED screen and two camera lenses. On the other hand, the iPhone SE comes with LTE, a Retina screen and one lens. But, the differences don't stop there. Importantly, the iPhone SE is powered by Apple's A13 chip, whereas the Pixel 5a relies on the Snapdragon 765G processor (not Google's upcoming Tensor chip). Computerworld executive editor Ken Mingis and Macworld executive editor Michael Simon join Juliet to discuss how the two phones compare.

    • 29 min
    Apple's plan to monitor iCloud photos met with pushback from cybersecurity and privacy experts

    Apple's plan to monitor iCloud photos met with pushback from cybersecurity and privacy experts

    Apple announced last week that it will soon begin scanning photos uploaded to iCloud for child sexual abuse material. Cybersecurity and privacy experts met the announcement with skepticism, with many pointing out potential abuse of this system. Specifically, experts say this encryption backdoor could encourage oppressive governments to ask Apple to police other types of illegal content. Apple says it will refuse such requests from governments. Still, this change, which will arrive in iOS 15, marks a shift in the company's privacy policy. Macworld executive editor Michael Simon and Computerworld executive editor Ken Mingis join Juliet to discuss Apple's privacy rules and why security experts are concerned about potential misuse of this surveillance tool.

    • 31 min
    Google makes its own chip for the Pixel 6, plus how to make hybrid work successful

    Google makes its own chip for the Pixel 6, plus how to make hybrid work successful

    Google announced that its new system on a chip, called Tensor, will power the upcoming the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro phones. Google says Tensor will improve the Pixel's camera system and its speech recognition abilities, among other things. The company's shift away from Qualcomm to Tensor follows Apple's path of making its own silicon. Macworld executive editor Michael Simon and Computerworld executive editor Ken Mingis join Juliet to discuss what this shift means for Google, and how the Pixel 6 will compare to the iPhone 13. Then, Computerworld managing editor for features Val Potter and writer Charlotte Trueman will join the show to explain how to intentionally create a successful hybrid work environment. As companies in some parts of the world craft plans to return to the office, the majority say they will permit hybrid work in some capacity. While companies are now used to employees working remotely, fostering an intentionally hybrid-first work is another strategy entirely. Val, Charlotte and Juliet will discuss how to successfully implement a hybrid-first policy and the consequences of waiting too long to do so.

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

AverageListener3000 ,

Bordering on Recklessness

I just listened to the first and last episode of this podcast, the one about FIDO security and a possible password-less future. The description of Zero Trust was inaccurate to put it mildly. But, the real problem was the core subject of passwords being replaced with biometrics. They did not discuss any of the problems with biometrics, like the fact that they cannot be changed or revoked like passwords can. They did not mention the risks of using SMS for 2FA due to SIM swap attacks, or the extreme measures some have suffered where criminals have cut off fingers to sign in to victims’ accounts. Hey, how about at least suggesting a password manager solution for the time being. These people know not of what they speak. Do not trust them.

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