100 episodes

Produced by Connecticut Public 'Where We Live' puts Connecticut in context. We bring you fascinating, informed, in-depth conversations and stories beyond news headlines.  We start local, but we take time to explore domestic and international issues and consider how they impact us personally and here at home.

Where We Live Connecticut Public Radio

    • News
    • 4.2 • 39 Ratings

Produced by Connecticut Public 'Where We Live' puts Connecticut in context. We bring you fascinating, informed, in-depth conversations and stories beyond news headlines.  We start local, but we take time to explore domestic and international issues and consider how they impact us personally and here at home.

    What do the national debt ceiling and a state budget surplus mean for you

    What do the national debt ceiling and a state budget surplus mean for you

    A U.S. debt default could be detrimental to federal employees, those in the military, and beneficiaries of Social Security and other government programs.

    Connecticut currently has the largest budget surplus in the state’s history. How the surplus might be utilized is still unknown.

    Today on Where We Live, we talk about what we might see prioritized in this year’s state budget, and how Congress could respond to the debt ceiling.

    We’ll also discuss what hitting the debt ceiling could mean for Connecticut residents.

    GUESTS:


    Dan Haar: Associate Editor and Columnist, Hearst Connecticut Media
    Ebong Udoma: Senior Reporter at WSHU
    Lisa Hagen: Federal Policy Reporter for Connecticut Public and Connecticut Mirror
    Keith Phaneuf: Budget Reporter, Connecticut Mirror
    Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 40 min
    Latinx stories are center stage at three Connecticut theaters

    Latinx stories are center stage at three Connecticut theaters

    At least three area theater companies in Connecticut are showcasing work by Latinx women playwrights this winter:


    "Water by the Spoonful" by Quiara Alegría Hudes at Capitol Classics from Jan. 25 to Jan. 29
    "Queen of Basel" by Hilary Bettis at TheaterWorks Feb. 3 to Feb. 26
    "Espejos: Clean" by Christine Quintana at Hartford Stage Jan. 12 to March 5

    "Queen of Basel" boasts an all-Latinx cast and crew, while "Espejos: Clean" is a bilingual production with supertitles projected over the stage.

    This hour, we go behind-the-scenes with playwrights, directors and actors, hearing about each powerful production, and the importance of spotlighting Latinx stories where we live.

    GUESTS:


    Hilary Bettis: Playwright, "Queen of Basel"
    Cristina Angeles: Director, "Queen of Basel" at TheaterWorks
    Cin Martinez: Playwright; Actor, "Water by the Spoonful" at Capitol Classics
    Melissa Crespo: Director, "Espejos/Clean" at Hartford Stage; Associate Artistic Director, Syracuse Stage
    Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 40 min
    'Oyster Haven Lost': Digging into the rich history of oystering in Long Island Sound

    'Oyster Haven Lost': Digging into the rich history of oystering in Long Island Sound

    Neil Berro, a local amateur historian, is building a massive manuscript on the history of Connecticut oystering titled Oyster Haven Lost. This hour, he previews this trove of information, spotlighting the state's once-booming oyster industry.Plus, the Sound School in New Haven was founded with a mission of centering hands-on curriculum, incorporating the harbor, marine science and oceanography in an “exciting educational alternative to the large comprehensive high schools in the city.”UntitledWe'll hear from Sound School aquaculture coordinators about how students encounter oysters and other filter feeders in the wild, helping to bolster their growth in Long Island Sound by planting "reef balls."GUESTS:


    Neil Berro: Amateur Historian
    Tim Visel: Former Aquaculture Coordinator, The Sound School
    Peter Solomon: Aquaculture Coordinator, The Sound School
    Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 40 min
    RuPaul’s Drag Race spotlights Connecticut’s “thriving” drag scene

    RuPaul’s Drag Race spotlights Connecticut’s “thriving” drag scene

    While contestants with Connecticut ties have appeared on the reality competition series RuPaul's Drag Race in the past, the season 15 premiere on MTV marks the first time more than one Connecticut drag queen has been represented.Robin Fierce from Hartford, Loosey LaDuca from Ansonia, Amethyst from West Hartford and Jax from Brooklyn, raised in Connecticut, comprise this season's Connecticut contingent.This hour, Loosey and Robin join us to discuss how they discovered drag, developed their artistry, and why they’re determined to confront misunderstanding by showcasing drag as a force for good.GUESTS:


    Loosey LaDuca: Contestant, RuPaul's Drag Race
    Robin Fierce: Contestant, RuPaul's Drag Race
    Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 49 min
    Connecticut tribes co-create state social studies curriculum, centering "our culture and our ways

    Connecticut tribes co-create state social studies curriculum, centering "our culture and our ways

    The State Department of Education and five Connecticut tribal nations are working together to meet a legislative mandate calling for Native American curriculum for K-12 social studies classes. Resources with localized information from the tribal nations themselves – Eastern Pequot, Mashantucket Pequot, Mohegan, Schaghticoke and Golden Hill Paugussett – are expected to be available in January 2024.

    This hour, we preview this collaboration with educators from the Mohegan Tribal Nation and the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation, as well as State Department of Education social studies advisor Steve Armstrong.

    Darlene Kascak, education coordinator for the Institute of American Indian Studies and a traditional Native American storyteller with the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation, explains the importance of centering, and distinguishing, each tribe's story and voice.

    Plus, Sam Cholewa Tondreau is the director of curriculum and instruction for the Mohegan Tribal Nation, helping develop the Educators Project, an online portal that provides a "combination of free Native American study resources and tools" to educators and homeschoolers.

    For those with young learners outside of the classroom who want to learn more, Cholewa Tondreau recommends the American Indian Library Association (ailanet.org) and American Indians in Children's Literature (AICL).

    Cholewa Tondreau points to one book she recommends for middle-schoolers and adults alike: An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States For Young People by Jean Mendoza, Debbie Reese, and Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz. "While United States history isn't 12,000 years old, it does add an additional layer of Indigenous perspective and events," she says.

    GUESTS:


    Darlene Kascak: Education Coordinator, Institute of American Indian Studies; Traditional Native American Storyteller, Schaghticoke Tribal Nation
    Sam Cholewa Tondreau: Director of Curriculum and Instruction, Mohegan Tribal Nation
    Steve Armstrong: Social Studies Consultant, Connecticut State Department of Education

    Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode!

    Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired December 6, 2022.
    Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 48 min
    A year for housing legislation: What we might see in the 2023 session

    A year for housing legislation: What we might see in the 2023 session

    One of the biggest focuses for the 2023 legislative session is housing. Rent has gone up for many Connecticut residents at a time when inflation limits what they can afford to pay. They face a lack of affordable housing in Connecticut – and eviction.

    Today, we talk about the housing market in our state, and what legislative action we might see in the future.

    We hear from those covering housing across our state including Jacqueline Rabe Thomas of Hearst Media and Ginny Monk from the Connecticut Mirror.

    Advocates are calling for rent caps and better protections against evictions, as well as more low income housing for residents of a variety of economic backgrounds and circumstances. Are you seeing enough affordable housing where you live?

    GUESTS:


    Ginny Monk: Children's issues and Housing Reporter for the CT Mirror
    Jacqui Rabe Thomas: Investigative Reporter for Hearst Media
    Christine Stuart: Editor-in-Chief of CT News Junkie
    Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 49 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
39 Ratings

39 Ratings

Retmus Wahs ,

Great show!

This show does a great job of making the connections between our state, the region, the country and the world! I never miss a show.

Ctmac83 ,

Love this show

This show is great for CT residents, and I love it on WNPR. I have a hard time tuning in live because of the hours it airs, so I am very happy to see it as a podcast.

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