202 episodes

We live in a confusing time, bombarded every day with news from around the world that can be hard to follow, or fully understand. Let Worldly be your guide. Every Thursday, senior writer Zack Beauchamp, senior foreign editor Jennifer Williams, and staff defense writer Alex Ward give you the history and context you need to make sense of the moment and navigate the world around you. Produced by Vox and the Vox Media Podcast Network.

Worldly Vox

    • News
    • 4.4 • 1.7K Ratings

We live in a confusing time, bombarded every day with news from around the world that can be hard to follow, or fully understand. Let Worldly be your guide. Every Thursday, senior writer Zack Beauchamp, senior foreign editor Jennifer Williams, and staff defense writer Alex Ward give you the history and context you need to make sense of the moment and navigate the world around you. Produced by Vox and the Vox Media Podcast Network.

    Bonus: Rep. Ro Khanna on what America owes India

    Bonus: Rep. Ro Khanna on what America owes India

    On a special bonus Worldly, Zack interviews Rep. Ro Khanna — the vice-chair of the House’s India Caucus — on the covid crisis in that country. They talk about how things got so bad in India and what it says about the state of India’s political institutions and democracy. Then they talk about the US response, where Rep. Khanna gives an inside view of how the Biden administration decided to increase its commitment to India — and makes the case for doing even more. They also reference a whole lot of political philosophy.

    References:
    Vox's Kelsey Piper wrote a piece about vaccine patents

    Amartya Sen's book Development as Freedom
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The politics of India’s Covid crisis

    The politics of India’s Covid crisis

    Zack, Jenn, and Alex discuss the political implications of the ongoing Covid-19 catastrophe in India, where cases are skyrocketing, overwhelming the country’s health care system. They look at how much Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government is to blame for the crisis and the degree to which it’s creating political problems for Modi both at home and abroad. In the second half, they talk about the recent local election in West Bengal, how it does and doesn’t relate to the Covid-19 outbreak, and the complex story it tells about the direction of Indian politics right now.

    References:

    Here’s Zack’s piece for Vox on the West Bengal elections.

    Vox’s Jen Kirby and Umair Irfan wrote about what more the world could do to help India.

    And this is Alex’s Vox story on what seemed like a looming India crisis last year.

    The New Yorker had an excellent piece on India under Modi back in 2019.

    The Diplomat reports on Modi’s political predicament.

    The Associated Press notes how India’s outbreak is ruining Modi’s image.

    Hosts:
    Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox
    Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox
    Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox
    Consider contributing to Vox:
    If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts
    More to explore:
    Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.
    About Vox:
    Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.
    Follow us:
    Vox.com
    Newsletter: Vox Sentences
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 46 min
    The surprising success of Covid-19 travel bans

    The surprising success of Covid-19 travel bans

    Zack, Jenn, and Alex are joined by special guest Julia Belluz, Vox's senior health correspondent, to talk about how Vietnam has managed to keep its total coronavirus deaths to just 35 — yes, you read that right, 35 — in part by completely sealing its borders with one of the world’s strictest travel bans. The gang discusses what led Vietnam to take such drastic measures, why they seem to have worked so well, and whether replicating that approach in other countries currently experiencing outbreaks is feasible now that the virus is so widespread. Then they zoom out to look at whether we can take lessons from Vietnam’s experience when thinking about how to deal with the next pandemic.

    References:

    Here’s Julia’s excellent piece for Vox on how Vietnam handled Covid-19.

    Vietnam has long been a Covid-19 success story. Vox wrote about it here and here.

    Check out Vox’s “Pandemic Playbook” series, featuring work from friend-of-the-show Jen Kirby on Senegal.

    The Hindustan Times notes that the farmers’ protest didn’t lead to India’s second wave.

    Here’s Kirby’s piece for Vox on India and its second wave.

    The Atlantic published a piece in 2020 about why the pandemic meant the post-9/11 era was over.

    Hosts:
    Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox
    Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox
    Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox

    Consider contributing to Vox:
    If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts

    More to explore:
    Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.

    About Vox:
    Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.

    Follow us:
    Vox.com
    Newsletter: Vox Sentences
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 47 min
    The Super League

    The Super League

    Twelve of Europe’s richest soccer teams tried, and failed, to create their own elite tournament in a naked money grab. Worldly’s Alex Ward, arguably Vox’s top soccer fan, explains why the move angered basically everyone and the scheme failed — for now.

    References:
    Alex wrote an explainer on the Super League and how the fans killed it.

    Support Worldly by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 9 min
    How Nigeria explains the climate crisis

    How Nigeria explains the climate crisis

    In a very special Earth Month episode, Zack, Jenn, and Alex use Nigeria as a case study to uncover the deep reasons why it’s so hard for the world to quit fossil fuels. Nigeria is a country deeply threatened by climate change, but it’s also one with a major oil industry that hopes to lift millions out of poverty — a feat that has never been done without some degree of reliance on dirty energy. The team explains how these barriers affect the prospects for mitigating climate change in both Nigeria and globally, and talk about what solutions might help overcome these barriers.

    References:

    Check out all of Vox’s Earth Month podcasts.

    This is Nigeria’s national climate action plan.

    Reuters reports on how Nigeria’s minister of environment said the country must be ready for oil’s decline.

    Science magazine explains how fighting poverty makes it harder to fight climate change.

    Amnesty International details the Shell controversy Zack mentioned.

    Olúfẹ́mi Táíwò wrote about the African case for carbon capture for Africa Is A Country.

    Zack read from this smart paper on home energy needs in Nigeria.

    Here’s Private Empire, the book on ExxonMobil by Steve Coll that Alex referenced.

    Learn about the problem with “degrowth.”

    Hosts:
    Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox
    Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox
    Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox

    Consider contributing to Vox:
    If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts
     
    More to explore:
    Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.
    About Vox:
    Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.
    Follow us:
    Vox.com
    Newsletter: Vox Sentences
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 59 min
    America is finally leaving Afghanistan

    America is finally leaving Afghanistan

    Zack, Jenn, and Alex talk about President Joe Biden’s announcement that all remaining US troops will withdraw from Afghanistan by September 11, 2021 — the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks that launched the war. They discuss what the US withdrawal means for the near-term future of Afghanistan, why Biden finally made the tough call that his predecessors couldn’t (or wouldn’t), and what that decision tells us about how Biden sees the future of US military engagement abroad.

    References:

    Here’s Alex’s Vox story on Biden’s announcement to withdraw all US troops by September 11.

    Alex interviewed experts making the best case for and against an Afghanistan withdrawal.

    Biden’s Afghanistan withdrawal speech is on the White House’s website.

    The Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace, and Security ranked Afghanistan as the second-worst country for women.

    The BBC reports that the Taliban is already claiming it won the war.

    The Wall Street Journal reported how the US is looking to other countries to base its counterterrorism forces.

    Here’s the story by the Daily Beast’s Spencer Ackerman on how Biden defended the war on terrorism.

    Hosts:
    Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox
    Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox
    Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox
     
    Consider contributing to Vox:
    If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts
     
    More to explore:
    Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.
     
    About Vox:
    Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.
     
    Follow Us:
    Vox.com 
    Newsletter: Vox Sentences
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 54 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
1.7K Ratings

1.7K Ratings

ROHAN. 321 ,

Great stuff but other vox better than this

Amazing content great but a lot of other vox shows are better than this

Smicheleclark ,

Silly tone is odd for facts being presented

I was interested in getting an in depth and critique of events happening around the world from the perspective of Vox employees. But it’s hard to listen to after a while when they can’t stop giggling or laughing at themselves, maybe because they’re not confident in how they present the info, but it’s definitely not landing as humorous. It comes off as this nerdy club that’s full of them selves and maybe isn’t as knowledgeable as they want to be or think they are. Their guests are more informative and serious in their presentation, and it’s sad to hear the hosts cut them off with “USA, USA.” In a way they’re turning the show into a joke in itself.

Inliwa ,

I love this podcast!!!

Another great Vox podcast.

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