177 episodes

The writers and editors of Rolling Stone take you inside the biggest stories in music. Featuring interviews with our favorite artists; what's playing in the office; expert insight on the week's biggest music news; and much more.

Rolling Stone Music Now Rolling Stone

    • Music
    • 4.2, 62 Ratings

The writers and editors of Rolling Stone take you inside the biggest stories in music. Featuring interviews with our favorite artists; what's playing in the office; expert insight on the week's biggest music news; and much more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
62 Ratings

62 Ratings

bongothewonderchimp ,

The Golden Age of Rock and Roll

I love Rock and Roll, so naturally I assumed I'd enjoy Rock and Roll podcasts. But I didn't: Most are recorded by guys that don't know how to speak, for people who don't know how to listen. When I saw Rolling Stone had a podcast I assumed the worst. Once standard bearer for the glorious revolution, turned corporate shill rag, and finally desperate and desperately obsolete, like that hair metal singer you're already picturing, what credibility the Rolling Stone had once gathered had long since dried to dust. I was expecting to hear a Jim Ladd kind of dude reminiscing about scoring weed for Grand Funk Railroad in '73, but I tried them anyway. First one I heard was a precocious child who sounded like McLovin, interviewing a barely tolerant Pete Townsend . The audio sounded like it had been accidently captured on a baby monitor. This was Rolling Stone? But then I heard Brian Hiatt. He sounds about 20 until you really listen, and then you hear what Rolling Stone once was: Smart, insightful, funny, deeply knowledgable and most of all passionate, genuinely passionate about all good music. Then I realized McLovin was Andy Green. I'm thinking in another universe Lester Bangs took Andy aside in 1973 and told him that he'd missed out on real rock and roll, but wants 1500 words on The Black Keys. Andy is smart, very smart, and hearing him shred indulgent revisionist rock biopics was pure joy. In the late 60's and early 70's Rolling Stone was amateur and unpolished, but driven by keen young minds that had something worth listening to, especially when it came to popular music, and thanks to Brian and Andy that spirit is back...at least in podcast form.

goodguyaustin ,

Quality content, but recording quality suffers

Love the show, but please back up from the microphones (and/or use pop filters). Way too many plosives and it distracts from what you’re actually saying. Keep up the good work!

Rougelightsaber ,

As irrelevant as the magazine I used to love

Surely with RS resources you could come up with a format that isn’t just personal opinions on musicians. Ex. “ I went to Woodstock 99 and had a bad time, most of the music was aggressive, the whole festival was a disaster”... Or the grunge episode where it sounded like millennials talking over top of one another about what “for me” is grunge. Super Pretentious

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