300 Folgen

The programme that offers a female perspective on the world

Woman's Hour BBC

    • Nachrichten
    • 4.5, 28 Bewertungen

The programme that offers a female perspective on the world

    Talking to kids about the US protests; Trouper Sandy Collver; Dating after lockdown

    Talking to kids about the US protests; Trouper Sandy Collver; Dating after lockdown

    The US has been convulsed by nationwide protests over the death of an African-American man in police custody. George Floyd, 46, died after being arrested by police outside a shop in Minneapolis, Minnesota. But what are black parents here saying to their youngsters about some of the images coming from America, such as the arrest footage itself, then the violent demonstrations and the angry confrontations between protesters and the police? And how does what happens there relate to how things are here?

    Could Neanderthal genes be influencing the fertility of modern humans? New research shows that one in three women in Europe have inherited sections of Neanderthal DNA that make them have fewer bleedings during pregnancy, fewer miscarriages and give birth to more children. Dr Hugo Zeberg from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany explains what it might mean for future fertility research.

    How are attitudes towards dating changing as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic? Has it changed how people feel about meeting prospective partners in real life? And now couples can meet for physically distanced dating, how confident will people feel about getting physically intimate once restrictions are lifted further? Zoe Strimpel is the author of Seeking Love in Modern Britain: Gender, Dating and the Rise of ‘the Single’. Oloni is a sex and relationships content creator.

    Coronavirus has made visible an often forgotten group of people – volunteers. Thousands have signed up to help the NHS, local residents’ groups have got together to help those who can’t get to the shops, or to call people who might be experiencing severe isolation. Before lockdown, Woman’s Hour began interviewing women who volunteered in all sorts of areas – from community cafes to food banks and working with the homeless. They're women who see a gap or a problem to be solved, and just get on with it – Troupers. They told their stories to Laura Thomas. Today it’s the turn of Sandy Collver, a volunteer nurse with St Johns Ambulance Sussex Homeless Service.

    • 48 Min.
    Troupers: the founders of the Profanity Embroidery Group. Tackling debt. Midwives on the benefits of colostrum

    Troupers: the founders of the Profanity Embroidery Group. Tackling debt. Midwives on the benefits of colostrum

    More from our series that celebrates the women who get things done – the Troupers. They're very bad at blowing their own trumpets so we're doing it for them. Today we hear from Annie Taylor and Wendy Robinson the founders of the Profanity Embroidery Group in Whitstable.

    After building up credit card debt of £25,000 Clare Seal decided she had to do something drastic to deal with it. She set up an Instagram account to make herself accountable. Posting anonymously she shared her story and offered advice and solidarity to a growing community of people. She’s now written a book with tips and advice for others in a similar situation. It’s called Real Life Money: an honest guide to taking control of your finances

    Plus two midwives from Kent Kent midwives - Sally Sidhu and Jan Gatehouse - who've just an award for their work on promoting colostrum tell Jane all about the benefits of so called "liquid gold" especially for premature babies.

    And as some children in England return to school how do you deal with a child who still needs to be shielded.

    Presenter Jane Garvey
    Producer Beverley Purcell

    Guest; Annie Taylor
    Guest; Wendy Robinson
    Guest; Clare Seal
    Guest; Sally Sidhu
    Guest; Jan Gatehouse

    • 51 Min.
    Women, alcohol and lockdown, The Equal Pay Act at 50, Public toilets, Giving birth in lockdown

    Women, alcohol and lockdown, The Equal Pay Act at 50, Public toilets, Giving birth in lockdown

    An editorial in the British Medical Journal reported that one in five harmful and dependent drinkers got the help they needed, and now the proportion will be lower. How do you cope with an alcohol problem under lockdown? We hear the experience of a listener, the journalist Catherine Renton who has been sober for over 3 years, and from Julia Sinclair, professor of Addiction Psychiatry, University of Southampton and consultant in alcohol addiction. She’s also chair of the Royal College of Psychiatry’s addiction faculty.

    It is fifty years since the Equal Pay Act became law. However, it’s proved tricky over the years for women to find out what their male comparators were earning. It’s also proved tricky for women without financial and legal support to use the law. However, cases have been brought over the years and as the law has been strengthened. Frances O’Grady, General Secretary of the TUC and Jane Hannon, Employment partner at the law firm DLA Piper discuss.

    The writer Michele Roberts discusses her memoir Negative Capability - written after the rejection of a novel by her publisher caused hurt and depression.

    Lizzie tells her story of giving birth during lockdown. We also hear from the obstetrician Dr Kenga Sivarajah.

    Council cuts have meant that there are 50% fewer public toilets than a decade ago. Coronavirus has caused even more closures – albeit temporarily. But where does that leave people who need urgent access to the loo? Jo Umbers from the Bladder and Bowel community explains how this issue is affecting women of all ages. Raymond Martin, from the British Toilet Association, discusses the economic and health importance of public toilets in a post-Covid world.

    Jackie Kay, the National Poet for Scotland, discusses her new online poetry and music festival Makar to Makar, which is streaming via the National Theatre of Scotland's YouTube channel. We also hear poetry from Gerda Stevenson and music from Claire Brown, who are both performing in the festival.

    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Producer: Dianne McGregor

    • 54 Min.
    The Equal Pay Act at 50, Rachael Hearson Health Visitor, Public Toilets

    The Equal Pay Act at 50, Rachael Hearson Health Visitor, Public Toilets

    It’s fifty years since the Equal Pay Act became law, though employers were given a couple of years to prepare for the change to take effect. The legislation followed the strike of a group of women machinists at the Ford factory in Dagenham who wanted to be paid just as a man would for doing skilled work. It set out that an individual can claim equal pay for work of equal value. However, it’s proved tricky over the years for women to find out what their male comparators were earning. It’s also proved tricky for women without financial and legal support to use the law. However, cases have been brought over the years and as the law has been strengthened. Last year, Glasgow City Council agreed to pay out a reported £548 million in compensation to thousands of women who were paid less than men working in jobs on the same grade. Jane is joined by Frances O’Grady, General Secretary of the TUC and by Jane Hannon, Employment partner at the law firm DLA Piper

    Health visiting is one of those professions that most people think is a bit of a non-job. After 40 years in the NHS and 30 as a health visitor, Rachael Hearson tells us why this is not the case. She’s written about her experiences and explains how the role has changed and why it’s needed more now than ever before. Her book is called Handle With Care.

    Public toilets have been a well-known victim of council cuts, leaving the UK with 50% fewer toilets than a decade ago. Coronavirus has caused even more closures – albeit temporarily. But where does that leave people who need urgent access to the loo? Jo Umbers from the Bladder and Bowel community explains how this issue is affecting women of all ages. Raymond Martin, from the British Toilet Association, discusses the economic and health importance of public toilets in a post-Covid world.

    Producer: Louise Corley
    Editor: Karen Dalziel

    • 48 Min.
    Women, alcohol & lockdown; Jenny Colgan; Michele Roberts

    Women, alcohol & lockdown; Jenny Colgan; Michele Roberts

    Last week an editorial in the BMJ reported that before Covid-19 only one in five harmful and dependent drinkers got the help they needed, and now the proportion will be lower. There is concern for those struggling with dependence and those on the brink of dependence. How do you cope with an alcohol problem under lockdown? And what support is out there? We hear the experience of a listener, the journalist Catherine Renton who has been sober for over 3 years and from Julia Sinclair, professor of Addiction Psychiatry, University of Southampton and consultant in alcohol addiction. She’s also chair of the Royal College of Psychiatry’s addiction faculty.

    Jenny Colgan's latest novel is called Five Hundred Miles From You. It's about a nurse in London and a nurse in the Scottish Highlands. It explores everything they've seen in their careers and whether or not they can help each other.

    Coronavirus has made visible a group of people who were often invisible – volunteers. Thousands of people signed up to help the NHS as a volunteer. Local residents’ groups have got together to help those who can’t get to the shops, or to call people who might be experiencing severe isolation. Before lockdown, Woman’s Hour began interviewing women who volunteered in all sorts of areas – community cafes, at food banks, working with the homeless. Women who see a gap, or a problem to be solved, and just get on with it – Troopers. They told their stories to Laura Thomas. Today Annie Taylor and Wendy Robinson, the founders of the Profanity Embroidery Group in Whitstable.

    How do authors cope with the rejection of the books they are writing? Struggling after her latest novel was rejected by publishers Michèle Roberts decided to write down everything that had happened. In the resulting memoir of a year, Negative Capability, Michèle reckons with the hurt and depression caused by the rejection. She rewrites and edits her novel, reconnects with and loses treasured friends, ultimately finding acceptance and understanding.

    Presented by Jenni Murray
    Produced by Sarah Crawley
    Interviewed guest: Catherine Renton
    Interviewed guest: Julia Sinclair
    Interviewed guest: Jenny Colgan
    Interviewed guest: Annie Taylor
    Interviewed guest: Wendy Robinson
    Interviewed guest: Michèle Roberts
    Reporter: Laura Thomas

    • 45 Min.
    Office Cleaners, Cassa Pancho, Jackie Kay

    Office Cleaners, Cassa Pancho, Jackie Kay

    The UK cleaning sector is worth almost £50bn a year to the country’s economy. It employs more than 900,000 people, mostly women. Right now, many are vulnerable. Some feel they won't be able to stop working if they fall ill or have to self- isolate because they can't afford it. Jenni speaks to Katy, a cleaner. Also Maria Gonzalez who's an employment barrister and Janet Macleod who's a Unite representative

    Cassa Pancho set up Ballet Black twenty years ago. It's a professional ballet company for Black and Asian dancers, and from the start its aim was to make the dance world more diverse. As well as Cassa, we also talk to Cira Robinson who performed with Stormzy at last year's Glastonbury. Tonight Ballet Black is part of a new BBC TV series called Danceworks.

    Jackie Kay, the National Poet for Scotland, also known as Makar, discusses her new online poetry and music festival. It's called Makar to Makar and streams via the National Theatre of Scotland's YouTube channel. We also hear from Gerda Stevenson who's a writer, actor, director and singer and is on Jackie's show, plus the singer Claire Brown, who performs a beautiful, traditional Scottish song live.

    • 44 Min.

Kundenrezensionen

4.5 von 5
28 Bewertungen

28 Bewertungen

A Zürich ,

Depends

Dip in and out, depending on the topic being discussed

Moonballoon ,

Love it

Fascinating, entertaining, informative and addictive! Become an integral part of my week.

Top‑Podcasts in Nachrichten

Zuhörer haben auch Folgendes abonniert:

Mehr von BBC