150 episodes

David Remnick is joined by The New Yorker’s award-winning writers, editors and artists to present a weekly mix of profiles, storytelling, and insightful conversations about the issues that matter — plus an occasional blast of comic genius from the magazine’s legendary Shouts and Murmurs page. The New Yorker has set a standard in journalism for generations and The New Yorker Radio Hour gives it a voice on public radio for the first time. Produced by The New Yorker and WNYC Studios.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin, Nancy and many more.
© WNYC Studios

The New Yorker Radio Hour WNYC

    • News Commentary
    • 4.4, 171 Ratings

David Remnick is joined by The New Yorker’s award-winning writers, editors and artists to present a weekly mix of profiles, storytelling, and insightful conversations about the issues that matter — plus an occasional blast of comic genius from the magazine’s legendary Shouts and Murmurs page. The New Yorker has set a standard in journalism for generations and The New Yorker Radio Hour gives it a voice on public radio for the first time. Produced by The New Yorker and WNYC Studios.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin, Nancy and many more.
© WNYC Studios

    Laura Marling, a Briton in Los Angeles

    Laura Marling, a Briton in Los Angeles

    The thirty-year-old British singer/songwriter Laura Marling has produced seven albums of dense but delicate folk music, starting when she was only eighteen. After several years touring on the road, she tells John Seabrook, she found herself in Los Angeles. Speaking at The New Yorker Festival in October, 2017, she explained how, growing up, her father played her a lot of Joni Mitchell, and the influence stuck. In Los Angeles, she felt that many of the musicians she had long idolized were still “there in the hills, looking down on the city.”

    Marling performed her songs “Daisy,” and “The Valley,” accompanying herself on guitar.

     

    This story originally aired January 26, 2018.

    • 15 min
    Hasan Minhaj and Kenan Thompson

    Hasan Minhaj and Kenan Thompson

    The 2019 New Yorker Festival was the twentieth edition of the annual event, and it was particularly star-studded. This program features interviews with Kenan Thompson, the longest-running cast member of “Saturday Night Live,” and Hasan Minhaj, the “Daily Show” veteran whose Netflix show “Patriot Act” won both an Emmy and a Peabody Award.

    • 34 min
    Keeping Released Prisoners Safe and Sane

    Keeping Released Prisoners Safe and Sane

    Starting this spring, many states began releasing some inmates from prisons and jails to try to reduce the spread of COVID-19. But a huge number of incarcerated people are mentally ill or addicted to drugs, or sometimes both. When those people are released, they may lose their only consistent access to treatment. Marianne McCune, a reporter for WNYC, spent weeks following a psychiatrist and a social worker as they tried to locate and then help some recently released patients at a time of uncertainty and chaos. 

    This is a collaboration between The New Yorker Radio Hour and WNYC’s “The United States of Anxiety.”

    • 29 min
    Hilton Als’s Homecoming and the March for Queer Liberation

    Hilton Als’s Homecoming and the March for Queer Liberation

    In the summer of 1967, a young black boy in Brooklyn was shot in the back by a police officer. The writer Hilton Als recalls the two days of “discord and sadness” that followed, and reflects on the connection between those demonstrations and this summer’s uprising following the killing of George Floyd. Plus, an activist group sees an opportunity to reclaim the mantle of gay pride after New York cancels its official parade. 

    • 19 min
    Live at Home Part II: Phoebe Bridgers

    Live at Home Part II: Phoebe Bridgers

    Phoebe Bridgers’s tour dates were cancelled—she was booked at Madison Square Garden, among other venues—so she performs songs from her recent album, “Punisher,” from home. The critic Amanda Petrusich talks about the joys of Folkways records, and the novelist Donald Antrim talks about a year in which he suffered from crippling depression and rarely left his apartment, finding that only music could be a balm for his isolation and fear.

    • 31 min
    Live at Home Part I: John Legend

    Live at Home Part I: John Legend

    Like everyone in the United States, John Legend has spent much of the past three months in lockdown. He has been recording new music (via Zoom), performing on Instagram, and promoting his upcoming album. Though many artists have delayed releasing records until they can schedule concert dates—increasingly the most reliable revenue in the music industry—Legend didn’t want to hold back. The new album, “Bigger Love,” was written before the pandemic and the current groundswell of protest for racial justice, but his message about resilience and faith resonates. All art, Legend tells David Remnick, “is there to help us imagine a different future.”

    • 16 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
171 Ratings

171 Ratings

MBelderson ,

Showcases exceptional journalism

I need to say little more than it lives up to the magazine’s world-class standards. It also has mercifully high technical production values (as a radio co-production it would be shocking if it din’t) which make it easier to listen to than a lot of its technically poor rivals.

One thing baffles me: the show’s vast number of producers. I’ve checked back over ten episodes and, on average, between ten and eleven producers are mentioned in the end credits (with three to five more people assisting). It is an absurd and embarrassingly high number. In comparison, similar BBC radio shows somehow struggle to get on air every week with just one producer and (sometimes) one assistant. Do these people realize should they defame (even accidentally) someone vengeful like, say, Peter Thiel, that they will all be liable? It is the main reason why the producer job is so important. If you take the credit, you have to shoulder the legal burden too.

Cosmovitelli ,

Losing it’s edge.

I used to love reading the New Yorker because it provided a window on so many worlds I knew nothing about. Increasingly this podcast seems to seek subjects to assist it in reiterating an increasingly predictable view of our time. I can’t stand journalism that seeks to create conflict for the sake of it, nevertheless, there are rarely any difficult questions asked here, and I think the content suffers as a result.

JA in UK ,

Essential Listening

Intelligent, erudite, eloquent and vitally informative news and views from the thankfully sane body of U.S. opinion.

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