150 episodes

David Remnick is joined by The New Yorker’s award-winning writers, editors and artists to present a weekly mix of profiles, storytelling, and insightful conversations about the issues that matter — plus an occasional blast of comic genius from the magazine’s legendary Shouts and Murmurs page. The New Yorker has set a standard in journalism for generations and The New Yorker Radio Hour gives it a voice on public radio for the first time. Produced by The New Yorker and WNYC Studios.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin, Nancy and many more.
© WNYC Studios

The New Yorker Radio Hour WNYC

    • News
    • 4.4 • 201 Ratings

David Remnick is joined by The New Yorker’s award-winning writers, editors and artists to present a weekly mix of profiles, storytelling, and insightful conversations about the issues that matter — plus an occasional blast of comic genius from the magazine’s legendary Shouts and Murmurs page. The New Yorker has set a standard in journalism for generations and The New Yorker Radio Hour gives it a voice on public radio for the first time. Produced by The New Yorker and WNYC Studios.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin, Nancy and many more.
© WNYC Studios

    Jon M. Chu on “In the Heights”

    Jon M. Chu on “In the Heights”

    It’s easy to see why the director Jon M. Chu was adamant that the release of “In the Heights” wait until this summer, when more people could see it in theatres: it’s big, it’s colorful, the dance sequences are complex—it’s a spectacle in the best sense of the term. “In the Heights,” based on Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hit stage musical, is a love letter to the largely Latino community in Washington Heights, in upper Manhattan. The characters are dreaming big and wrestling with what happens when those dreams start to pull them away from the neighborhood. For Chu, who directed the enormous hit “Crazy Rich Asians,” directing the film was a risk—it’s said that Miranda teased him by writing “Don’t fuck this up” on his copy of the script. As an Asian-American from California, Chu “was already one step removed from this neighborhood,” he tells David Remnick. “How do you make sure you don’t miss a detail? The director is probably the only person on set who can stop everything and say, ‘Let’s discuss this.’ . . . That’s what made me nervous, making sure I was always present to hear those things.”

    • 16 min
    Yo-Yo Ma and Emanuel Ax on Beethoven’s Politics of the Cello

    Yo-Yo Ma and Emanuel Ax on Beethoven’s Politics of the Cello

    Yo-Yo Ma and Emanuel Ax have both been playing Beethoven’s Cello Sonata No. 3 in A Major for over forty years. But it took a global pandemic for the two of them to fully understand it. “This is such open, hopeful music,” Ax said. But when Beethoven dedicated the original piece to a friend, he signed the manuscript, “amid tears and sorrow.” Beethoven, Ma and Ax reflected, finished the sonata during a tumultuous period in which Napoleon was at war with Austria and the composer was losing his hearing. “I thought this was a good piece for this moment,” Ma told The New Yorker’s music critic Alex Ross. “Because people are suffering, and we do think that music can give comfort.” The musicians spoke to Ross and performed from an empty concert hall as part of the New Yorker Festival. 

     

    The segment originally aired November 13, 2020.

    • 21 min
    A Vaccinated Day at the Ballpark, and Sarah Schulman on ACT-UP

    A Vaccinated Day at the Ballpark, and Sarah Schulman on ACT-UP

    The staff writer Patricia Marx checks out the new vaccinated sections at New York’s Major League Baseball parks. The author and activist Sarah Schulman talks with David Remnick about her new book on the early years of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power. The group’s radical tactics forced changes in government policy and transformed how America saw gay people and AIDS patients.

    • 28 min
    Looking Back at the Year of Protest Since the Death of George Floyd

    Looking Back at the Year of Protest Since the Death of George Floyd

    We look back on the year since the murder of George Floyd galvanized the nation. David Remnick talks with Vanita Gupta, the No. 3 official in the Justice Department, who is charged with delivering on President Biden’s bold promises to address racial injustice. A Minneapolis activist explains why it is so hard to abolish the police. Plus, Hilton Als on why America finally rose up against long-standing abuses of Black people.

    • 34 min
    Spike Lee on the Knicks’ Resurgence

    Spike Lee on the Knicks’ Resurgence

    Spike Lee is one of the most passionate and committed fans of the New York Knicks—not to mention one of the most celebrated filmmakers of our time. Underdogs for many years, the Knicks are enjoying a renaissance, and Lee is in his glory. David Remnick and Vinson Cunningham called Lee to talk about a life of fandom, the politics of activism in the N.B.A. and the N.F.L., and Lee’s multipart documentary about life in New York since September 11th, which will be released to mark the twentieth anniversary of the attacks.

    Can We Finally End School Segregation?

    Can We Finally End School Segregation?

    By many accounts, American schools are as segregated today as they were in the nineteen-sixties, in the years after Brown v. Board of Education. WNYC’s podcast “The United States of Anxiety” chronicled the efforts of one small school district, Sausalito Marin City Schools, in California, to desegregate. Fifty years after parents and educators there first attempted integration, the state’s attorney general found that the district “knowingly and intentionally” maintained a segregated system, violating the equal-protection clause of the Constitution. The district’s older public school, which served mostly Black and Latino students, suffered neglect; meanwhile, a new charter school, though racially diverse, enrolled virtually all the white children in the district. The reporter Marianne McCune explored how one community overcame decades of distrust to finally integrate.

    • 49 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
201 Ratings

201 Ratings

MBelderson ,

Showcases exceptional journalism

I need to say little more than it lives up to the magazine’s world-class standards. It also has mercifully high technical production values (as a radio co-production it would be shocking if it din’t) which make it easier to listen to than a lot of its technically poor rivals.

One thing baffles me: the show’s vast number of producers. I’ve checked back over ten episodes and, on average, between ten and eleven producers are mentioned in the end credits (with three to five more people assisting). It is an absurd and embarrassingly high number. In comparison, similar BBC radio shows somehow struggle to get on air every week with just one producer and (sometimes) one assistant. Do these people realize should they defame (even accidentally) someone vengeful like, say, Peter Thiel, that they will all be liable? It is the main reason why the producer job is so important. If you take the credit, you have to shoulder the legal burden too.

HistoryObserver ,

Thought provoking and challenging

This episode on faith and politics in the USA was both thought provoking and challenging.
Giving a perspective from both (what one might call) the ‘Evangelical Left’ and Catholicism, the discussions frankly and openly discuss both the changing nature of this faith interaction with politics and contemporary issues and questions. Great podcast.

Cosmovitelli ,

Losing it’s edge.

I used to love reading the New Yorker because it provided a window on so many worlds I knew nothing about. Increasingly this podcast seems to seek subjects to assist it in reiterating an increasingly predictable view of our time. I can’t stand journalism that seeks to create conflict for the sake of it, nevertheless, there are rarely any difficult questions asked here, and I think the content suffers as a result.

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