269 episodes

A biweekly roundtable by the former editorial team of The Dissolve examining how classic films inspire and inform modern movies. Episodes take a deep dive into a classic film and its legacy in the first half, then compare and contrast that film with a modern successor in the second. Hosted and produced by Genevieve Koski, Keith Phipps, Tasha Robinson and Scott Tobias. Part of the Filmspotting family of podcasts.

The Next Picture Sho‪w‬ Filmspotting Network

    • Film History
    • 4.7 • 620 Ratings

A biweekly roundtable by the former editorial team of The Dissolve examining how classic films inspire and inform modern movies. Episodes take a deep dive into a classic film and its legacy in the first half, then compare and contrast that film with a modern successor in the second. Hosted and produced by Genevieve Koski, Keith Phipps, Tasha Robinson and Scott Tobias. Part of the Filmspotting family of podcasts.

    Hard Water Pt. 1 — Jean de Florette

    Hard Water Pt. 1 — Jean de Florette

    Lee Isaac Chung’s new MINARI centers on a family starting over in the country, a theme that got us thinking about French director Claude Berri’s 1986 film JEAN DE FLORETTE, and how its concerns of agrarian hardship in general and water scarcity in particular echo those in Chung’s film. In this half of the pairing we get into JEAN DE FLORETTE’s unsparing view of an oft-idealized provincial setting, its showy yet subtle performances, and what it reveals about French filmmaking in the 1980s. Plus, we respond to some of our favorite kind of feedback — voicemail feedback!

    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about JEAN DE FLORETTE, MINARI, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. 

    Outro Music: The Temptations, “I Wish It Would Rain”
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    • 56 min
    Uneasy Riders Pt. 2 — Nomadland

    Uneasy Riders Pt. 2 — Nomadland

    In Chloe Zhao’s new NOMADLAND, Frances McDormand’s Fern “drops out of society” not by choice, unlike the yuppie couple at the center of Albert Brooks’ 1985 comedy LOST IN AMERICA, but she proves much more adept than they at surviving (perhaps even thriving?) outside the mainstream. This week we bring NOMADLAND’s view of life on the road into conversation with LOST IN AMERICA’s satirization of the impulse to pursue that lifestyle, to consider their respective approaches to dropping out of society and living without a safety net. Plus Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent filmgoing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your radar.

    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about LOST IN AMERICA, NOMADLAND, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. 

    Your Next Picture Show:

    Tasha: David Lynch’s THE STRAIGHT STORY
    Keith: Agnès Varda’s DAGUERREOTYPES
    Genevieve: The New York Times Presents FRAMING BRITNEY SPEARS
    Scott: Sarah Polley’s STORIES WE TELL
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    • 1 hr 17 min
    Uneasy Riders Pt. 1 — Lost In America

    Uneasy Riders Pt. 1 — Lost In America

    Chloe Zhao’s new feature NOMADLAND presents a “houseless” life on the road as a choice born half out of desperation and half out of curiosity about life outside the American mainstream, which called to mind the yuppie adventurers looking to “drop out of society” in Albert Brooks’ 1985 comedy LOST IN AMERICA. This week, Brooks’ film serves as the catalyst for another Scott-Tasha showdown, as we dig into the nuances of both Brooks’ comedic style and the satirical premise he sets up in LOST IN AMERICA. Plus, we respond to some feedback on our recent episodes on AMERICAN PSYCHO and PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN.

    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about LOST IN AMERICA, NOMADLAND, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. 

    Outro Music: Johnny Cash, “I’m an Easy Rider”
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    • 1 hr 4 min
    Lady Killers, Pt. 2 — Promising Young Woman

    Lady Killers, Pt. 2 — Promising Young Woman

    Though Emerald Fennell has cited Mary Harron’s AMERICAN PSYCHO as one of the inspiration points for her buzzy debut feature PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN, there’s not a whole lot obviously linking the films in terms of protagonist, narrative, or even their respective satirical targets. But as we discuss in this week’s comparison, both woman-directed films are deeply concerned with ideas of male privilege and toxic masculinity, make ample use of high-pop needledrops, and engage with violence in a heightened and stylized manner that underlines their thematic concerns. We get into all that, plus Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent filmgoing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your radar.

    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about AMERICAN PSYCHO, PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. 

    Your Next Picture Show:

    Scott: Abel Ferrara’s MS. 45
    Keith: Mary Harron/Guinevere Turner’s THE NOTORIOUS BETTIE PAGE and CHARLIE SAYS
    Tasha: “Emerald Fennel Explains Herself” by Angelica Jade Bastién (Vulture.com)
    Genevieve: Eugene Ashe’s SYLVIE’S LOVE

    Outro Music: Juice Newton, “Angel of the Morning”
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    • 1 hr 27 min
    Lady Killers, Pt. 1 — American Psycho

    Lady Killers, Pt. 1 — American Psycho

    PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN writer-director Emerald Fennell has cited AMERICAN PSYCHO as one of her cinematic reference points when creating her first debut feature, which was enough reason for us to revisit Mary Harron’s 2000 cult classic ‘80s satire to see if there’s more to that comparison than the films’ shared taste for dark, dark humor. First up this week, we dig into AMERICAN PSYCHO’s inscrutable protagonist and even more inscrutable ending, its approach to adapting what many considered an unadaptable Bret Easton Ellis novel, and whether the characters in this film who are not named Patrick Batemen have any lasting resonance. Plus, we respond to some feedback regarding our recent episode on Pixar’s SOUL, and another about the pandemic’s effects on our home-viewing habits.

    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about AMERICAN PSYCHO, PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. 

    Works Cited:
    • “The Frustrating Tradition Behind Soul’s Great Flaw,” by Robert Daniels (polygon.com)
    • “Stop Telling Me To Turn My Brain Off At Movies,” by Matt Singer (screencrush.com)
    • “Pixar’s Troubled ‘Soul’” by Namwali Serpell (newyorker.com)

    Outro Music: Huey Lewis and the News, “Hip to Be Square”
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    • 1 hr 4 min
    Drinking Buddies, Pt. 2 — Another Round

    Drinking Buddies, Pt. 2 — Another Round

    With the new ANOTHER ROUND, Thomas Vinterberg saw Alexander Payne’s 2004 middle-aged-men-drink-and-have-feelings comedy SIDEWAYS and said “Hold my Akvavit.” After swooning for a while over Vinterberg’s film — in particular its spectacular closing scene — we bring it into conversation with Payne’s to consider what the two films are each driving at when it comes to their ideas about middle age, lost youth, and drinking culture, and tackle the inevitable (but perhaps uninteresting) question of “is this alcoholism?” Plus, Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent filmgoing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your radar.

    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about SIDEWAYS, ANOTHER ROUND, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. 

    Your Next Picture Show:

    Tasha: Blake Edwards’ DAYS OF WINE AND ROSES
    Genevieve: Steven Soderbergh’s LET THEM ALL TALK
    Keith: Joko Anwar’s IMPETIGORE
    Scott: Sergio Leone’s ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST

    Outro Music: Scarlet Pleasure, “What a Life”
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    • 1 hr 13 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
620 Ratings

620 Ratings

Filmspotting ,

A Few Good Men and Chicago 7?

That’s a combo that’s just waiting to be discussed!

Also, thank you very much for your informed and thoughtful discussions and analyses.

mic-check1212 ,

Podcast is great. Tasha is insufferable :’)

I love this podcast and learn so much from it! No movie seems to be good enough for Tasha which is very annoying and pretentious to me as a listener. I appreciate the other hosts perspectives and how they push back on Tasha who seems to need the last word. One star for the Britney Spears and Paris Hilton hate. Honestly how dare you speak ill of Britney and say that she belongs on the “anti-feminist” island. Do your research... this is embarrassing for you.

DumplingDiva ,

Hot air

Smug and boring windbaggery.

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