300 episodes

Extraordinary first person stories from around the world

Outloo‪k‬ BBC

    • Personal Journals
    • 4.7 • 236 Ratings

Extraordinary first person stories from around the world

    The sport I love damaged my brain

    The sport I love damaged my brain

    From the time he started playing rugby at the age of four, Alix Popham and everyone around him knew he was destined for big things. He didn't disappoint, representing his country, Wales, more than thirty times during a long and successful career at the top of the game. When injury forced him into retirement in 2011, he became an entrepreneur and fell in love with an old schoolfriend, Mel, with whom he had a baby girl. But their bright future dimmed when Alix found out last year - at the age of 40 - that he has early-onset dementia, a condition his doctors blame on brain trauma suffered throughout his career. He now struggles to remember many of his finest moments on the pitch. The devastating diagnosis has rocked his family - and the sport they love. Alix and Mel spoke to Jo Fidgen.

    Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


    Picture: Alix Popham and Mel Bramwell-Popham
    Credit: Alix Popham

    • 36 min
    The Cuban dad who became a lifeline for Chernobyl's children

    The Cuban dad who became a lifeline for Chernobyl's children

    In 1990, Manuel Barriuso was a professor of Russian literature in Havana when one morning he was ordered to the city's paediatric hospital. Unknown to him, a plane-load of seriously ill children – all victims of the devastating Chernobyl nuclear disaster – had arrived in Cuba for free treatment in a historic humanitarian program. And Manuel – who had no medical background – would be one of their translators. He had to abandon Tolstoy and Chekov and learn about oncology to translate life and death conversations between medics, sick children and their distressed parents. Manuel's sons Sebastián and Rodrigo have turned their father's story into the award-winning feature film, Un Traductor.

    Presenter: Emily Webb
    Producer: Maryam Maruf

    Translations by Jose Lopez and Melissa Riggall, and voiceover by Martin Esposito.

    Picture: Manuel Barriuso with his sons Sebastián and Rodrigo Barriuso, 1992.
    Credit: Courtesy of Rodrigo & Sebastián Barriuso

    Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

    • 29 min
    An Orthodox rapper in Jerusalem

    An Orthodox rapper in Jerusalem

    Nissim Black grew up in the American city of Seattle, where he made his name rapping about drug dealing and drive-by shootings. These were all subjects that were familiar to him, and his music was doing well, but nevertheless Nissim became increasingly unhappy with the gangster image he portrayed. He started as a Christian looking for answers in the Bible, but a growing interest in the Old Testament led on to a conversion to Orthodox Judaism, and ultimately a move to Jerusalem. Nissim still raps, but now he does it in a Shtreimel hat.

    Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


    Presenter Emily Webb
    Producer: Harry Graham

    Picture: Nissim Black
    Credit: Tziporah Litman

    • 22 min
    My son found his birth mother using Google Earth

    My son found his birth mother using Google Earth

    Sue Brierley adopted her son, Saroo, after he had been found wandering the streets of Kolkata as a five year old. He had got on a train that took him across India and away from his birth family, and couldn’t find his way back. Sue always believed that Saroo’s birth mother was alive, and would send comforting thoughts to her every night, sharing the boy's progress as he grew up in Tasmania. 25 years later Saroo used satellite maps online to retrace his steps to his first family’s home in India, and Sue finally met the birth mother she had thought about for so long. Saroo’s story was made into the Oscar-nominated film Lion, in which Sue’s character is played by Nicole Kidman.

    Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

    Presenter: Emily Webb
    Producer: Rebecca Vincent

    Picture: Sue Brierley with Saroo, shortly after his adoption
    Credit: Photo courtesy of Sue Brierley

    • 40 min
    Taking over my parents' legendary jazz venue

    Taking over my parents' legendary jazz venue

    In 1961, American couple Allan and Sandra Jaffe were on their honeymoon when they stumbled upon some of their favourite jazz musicians playing at a small art gallery in New Orleans. Within days the young couple had been offered the chance to run the place. Over the next 30 years they helped turn it into one of the city’s jazz institutions, Preservation Hall. Their son Ben Jaffe tells Outlook’s Emily Webb about following in the footsteps of his tuba-playing father - both in running the venue and as bandleader of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band.

    Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


    Presenter: Emily Webb
    Producer: Andrea Rangecroft

    Picture: Ben Jaffe, Creative Director of Preservation Hall
    Credit: Josh Goleman

    • 39 min
    New York to Saigon: taking beers to my friends in a warzone

    New York to Saigon: taking beers to my friends in a warzone

    A crazy idea thrown around a neighbourhood pub soon became the adventure of a lifetime. In 1967 New-York-City-native Chickie Donahue crossed oceans and hitched rides across a warzone to hand-deliver beers to his friends fighting in Vietnam. Not a soldier, Chickie relied on his charm and wit to get him to where he needed to go. But what began as a short morale-boosting mission soon became much more trecherous as Chickie found himself caught up in the deadly Lunar New Year attacks on what was then Saigon.


    Presenter and producer: Mariana Des Forges

    Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

    Picture: Chickie Donahue in Vietnam
    Credit: Courtesy of Chickie Donahue

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
236 Ratings

236 Ratings

Seton Notes ,

Probably my favorite podcast in the world

Amazing, lesser known, heroic stories. So well-told and with such empathy. Can bring joy and inspiration in dark times. Thank you thank you for continuing to make this series.

OG in NC ,

My favorite podcast

I absolutely love this show. I listen to a lot of podcasts, and usually have the radio on at home in the background (often tuned to BBC.) Outlook is a wonderful show for so many reasons: it is intimate, and worldly; it deals with heavy issues, such as death, heartbreak, sexuality, parenting, while often mainaining a sense of humor and optimism. The interviewers, two women, are superb. I can't recommend it highly enough.

e b-p ,

Danny Stewart/ We found our baby on the subway

Stopping a busy Saturday morning to leave a huge appreciation for this story- it is one of the dearest and most relatable stories I’ve ever heard. Thank you BBC, and God bless lucky Kevin’s adopted parents. This is the way the world should work. Love is love!!!

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