1,002 episodes

Interviews with Political Scientists about their New Books
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Interviews with Political Scientists about their New Books
Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

    Ronald Beiner, "Dangerous Minds: Nietzsche, Heidegger, and the Return of the Far Right" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2018)

    Ronald Beiner, "Dangerous Minds: Nietzsche, Heidegger, and the Return of the Far Right" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2018)

    Following the fall of the Berlin Wall and demise of the Soviet Union, prominent Western thinkers began to suggest that liberal democracy had triumphed decisively on the world stage. Having banished fascism in World War II, liberalism had now buried communism, and the result would be an end of major ideological conflicts, as liberal norms and institutions spread to every corner of the globe. With the Brexit vote in Great Britain, the resurgence of right-wing populist parties across the European continent, and the surprising ascent of Donald Trump to the American presidency, such hopes have begun to seem hopelessly naïve. The far right is back, and serious rethinking is in order.
    In Dangerous Minds: Nietzsche, Heidegger, and the Return of the Far Right (U Pennsylvania Press, 2018), Ronald Beiner traces the deepest philosophical roots of such right-wing ideologues as Richard Spencer, Aleksandr Dugin, and Steve Bannon to the writings of Nietzsche and Heidegger--and specifically to the aspects of their thought that express revulsion for the liberal-democratic view of life. Beiner contends that Nietzsche's hatred and critique of bourgeois, egalitarian societies has engendered new disciples on the populist right who threaten to overturn the modern liberal consensus. Heidegger, no less than Nietzsche, thoroughly rejected the moral and political values that arose during the Enlightenment and came to power in the wake of the French Revolution. Understanding Heideggerian dissatisfaction with modernity, and how it functions as a philosophical magnet for those most profoundly alienated from the reigning liberal-democratic order, Beiner argues, will give us insight into the recent and unexpected return of the far right.
    Beiner does not deny that Nietzsche and Heidegger are important thinkers; nor does he seek to expel them from the history of philosophy. But he does advocate that we rigorously engage with their influential thought in light of current events--and he suggests that we place their severe critique of modern liberal ideals at the center of this engagement.
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    • 47 min
    Sumantra Bose, "Kashmir at the Crossroads: Inside a 21st-Century Conflict" (Yale UP, 2021)

    Sumantra Bose, "Kashmir at the Crossroads: Inside a 21st-Century Conflict" (Yale UP, 2021)

    “Kashmir” carries the burden of being known as one of the world’s biggest flashpoints. If a novel, TV show, or video game wants an easy international crisis, there’s a good chance Kashmir will be the crisis of choice.
    But while Kashmir is globally known, few understand the roots of the conflict—or what the people that live in Kashmir actually think.
    For those that do, Professor Sumantra Bose’s Kashmir at the Crossroads: Inside a 21st-Century Conflict (Yale University Press, 2021) walks readers through the origins, developments, and potential future of the situation in Jammu and Kashmir, going right to the present day with the Modi administration’s turning of the state into two Union territories.
    In this interview, we run through the history of Kashmir, and how we should think about recent developments in this part of the world.
    Sumantra Bose is one of the world’s foremost experts on the Kashmir conflict. He is the author of seven previous books including Contested Lands: Israel-Palestine, Kashmir, Bosnia, Cyprus and Sri Lanka (Harvard University Press: 2007) and Secular States, Religious Politics: India, Turkey, and the Future of Secularism (Cambridge University Press: 2018).
    You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Kashmir at the Crossroads. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia.
    Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon.
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    • 1 hr 3 min
    Eric D. Loepp et al., "The Palgrave Handbook of Political Research Pedagogy" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

    Eric D. Loepp et al., "The Palgrave Handbook of Political Research Pedagogy" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

    Political Scientists Daniel Mallinson (Pennsylvania State University-Harrisburg), Julia Marin Hellwege (University of South Dakota), and Eric Loepp (University of Wisconsin-Whitewater) have assembled more than thirty chapters that examine how to think about and teach political science research. Reading The Palgrave Handbook of Political Research Pedagogy (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021) is almost like attending a teaching and learning conference focused on how to teach the research process to students. The book is divided into four sections: information literacy, research design, research methods, and research writing. Each section includes numerous chapters written by a diversity of authors. These authors include not only political scientists, but also graduate students and librarians. The broad array of authors come from a wide cross section of kinds of institutions, they represent a variety of ranks and positions, and they also provide representative diversity in terms of gender, race, and ethnicity. One of the common themes throughout the chapters is the integration of personal experience in teaching aspects of the research process—thus, the chapters provide the audience with stories of successes and failures, reconceptualizing the learning objectives in research, particularly research methods, classes, and many “how to” guides to integrating different approaches into the classroom.
    As we discuss in the conversation, The Handbook was originally conceptualized as two volumes: one volume on teaching students how to consume political science research, learning how to interpret and digest research; the other volume directed at how to produce political science research, so how to teach students about research methods and writing up their work. Ultimately, both approaches were integrated into a singular, very accessible volume that has guidance for so many of us who teach any number of aspects of the research process. The many authors pay attention to how much knowledge students have as they enter the political science classroom, and thus where we, as educators, need to meet them. Being aware of this starting point also helps to guide the pedagogical approaches that we take in teaching students about the research process, the skills and capacities that are needed to master an understanding of political science, and how to help students to learn these skills and abilities. This is a very valuable handbook for anyone who is teaching political science, regardless of substantive area within the discipline or years of experience—and it is engaging and accessible.
    Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj.
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    • 48 min
    Gideon Sapir and Daniel Statman, "State and Religion in Israel: A Philosophical-Legal Inquiry" (Cambridge UP, 2019)

    Gideon Sapir and Daniel Statman, "State and Religion in Israel: A Philosophical-Legal Inquiry" (Cambridge UP, 2019)

    Mahatma Gandhi said, “Those who believe religion and politics aren't connected don't understand either.”
    The relationship between religion and state presents complex challenges to liberal democracies around the world. In this work, Gideon Sapir and David Statman

    Propose a comprehensive theory about state and religion relations, providing tools to think systematically about questions in this field

    Use a clear philosophical underpinning for its analysis

    Offer a detailed case study of the arrangements in Israel which encourages sensitivity to the unique circumstances of different countries


    State and Religion in Israel: A Philosophical-Legal Inquiry (Cambridge UP, 2019) begins with a philosophical analysis of the two main questions regarding the role of religion in liberal states: should such states institute a 'Wall of Separation' between state and religion? Should they offer religious practices and religious communities special protection?
    Sapir and Statman argue that liberalism in not committed to Separation, but is committed to granting religion a unique protection, albeit a narrower one than often assumed. They then use Israel as a case study for their conclusions.
    Although Israel is defined as a Jewish state, its Jewish identity need not be interpreted religiously, requiring that it subjects itself to the dictates of Jewish law (Halakha). The authors test this view by critically examining important topics relevant to state and religion in Israel, such as marriage and divorce, the drafting of yeshiva students into the army, and the character of the Sabbath.
    Renee Garfinkel, Ph.D. is a psychologist, writer, Middle East television commentator and host of The New Books Network’s Van Leer Jerusalem Series on Ideas. Write her at reneeg@vanleer.org.il
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    • 58 min
    Conflicted Citizenship in Vietnam: Between Grassroots Mobilization and State Repression

    Conflicted Citizenship in Vietnam: Between Grassroots Mobilization and State Repression

    Does ‘citizenship’ exist in a socialist or communist context? If it does, what would this mean in the case of Vietnam? To what extent do the Vietnamese state and Vietnamese citizens perceive citizenship differently? And how are those differences negotiated? Why does the wave of recent popular protests in neighbouring countries concern the Vietnamese government? Two lecturers from the University of Passau, Mirjam Le and Franziska Nicolaisen, share and discuss with Linh Phương Lê their findings on these issues.
    Mirjam Le is a lecturer and PhD researcher in Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Passau, Germany. Her thesis focuses on small town urbanization and the production of urban space in Vietnam. Her research interests involve urbanization and state-society relations in Vietnam, especially processes of self-organization and citizenship.
    Franziska S. Nicolaisen is a lecturer and research assistant for the chair of Development Economics at the University of Passau in Germany. Her work focuses on sustainable urban mobility in Vietnam. Other research interests include heritage tourism, health governance and social movements in the context of Southeast Asia.
    This episode is a discussion of their chapter of the same title, published in Vietnam at the Vanguard: New Perspectives Across Time, Space, and Community, edited by Jamie Gillen, Liam Kelley and Phan Le Ha (Springer 2021).
    Linh Phương Lê is a PhD Researcher at the Institute for Media Studies, KU Leuven University in Belgium. Her work explores the media representation of Vietnamese female migrants to China and Taiwan. A former NIAS-SUPRA scholarship receiver, Linh’s regional focus is on Vietnam and East Asia.
    The Nordic Asia Podcast is a collaboration sharing expertise on Asia across the Nordic region, brought to you by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) based at the University of Copenhagen, along with our academic partners: the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Turku, and Asianettverket at the University of Oslo.
    We aim to produce timely, topical and well-edited discussions of new research and developments about Asia.
    About NIAS: www.nias.ku.dk
    Transcripts of the Nordic Asia Podcasts: http://www.nias.ku.dk/nordic-asia-podcast
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    • 28 min
    Kris Sealey, "Creolizing the Nation" (Northwestern UP, 2020)

    Kris Sealey, "Creolizing the Nation" (Northwestern UP, 2020)

    Can the concept of the nation be a resource for liberatory political struggle? Are the dangers of nationalism simply too great? In Creolizing the Nation (Northwestern UP, 2020), Kris F. Sealey argues that creolization offers theoretical resources for imagining the possibilities of decolonial nations. Such new imaginings are made possible by the ways creolization allows us to think subjectivity, community, and history inventively. Sealey draws our focus to everyday practices of sabotage and jostling that deserve our attention. She creates conversations between the work of Édouard Glissant, Frantz Fanon, Gloria Anzaldúa, María Lugones, and Mariana Ortega to theorize identity and community in terms of difference, flux, and ambiguity. Sealey gives us errant possibilities. Creolizing the Nation was just awarded the Nicolás Cristóbal Guillén Batista Outstanding Book Award by the Caribbean Philosophical Association.
    Sarah Tyson is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Colorado, Denver.
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    • 57 min

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50 Ratings

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an Archy ,

Fascinating but flawed

The New Books podcasts do me a huge service by keeping me up to date on my field (American elections and public opinion) while introducing me to work is never have thought to read on my own. For example, I really enjoyed the recent episode on Buddhist politics in Myanmar.

However, they also occasionally remind me how much academics struggle to explain their work. Obviously these podcasts aren't aimed at a lay audience, but the interviewees often have trouble conveying why even another academic outside their subfield might care about their subject. And the interviewers sometimes seem indifferent when not talking about their own are; sometimes it feels like they're just skimming the chapter titles to guide their questions.

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Concerned Political Scientist ,

John Yoo?

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A Syrian NoOne ,

Syrian

Big thank you Political Science.
To Blumenthal’s critics:
Keep your dirty petrodollars, your crazed Takfiri radical militants from China, Chechnya, and from all over the world, keep the mountains of media campaigns of deception, cynicism, and lies. Keep those maniac sectarian psychos who deny the river of blood shed at the hands of your “Moderate Rebels.”
But give us “Management of Savagery.”

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